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Thursday, 12 April

04:00

Fortanix presenting on protecting containerized apps with runtime encryption at RSAC 2018 Help Net Security

Fortanix been selected to present in the session Protecting Containers from Host-Level Attacks at RSA Conference 2018 next week. CEO and Co-Founder Ambuj Kumar will join renowned cryptography expert Benjamin Jun, CEO of HVF Labs, and Docker Security Lead David Lawrence in the session that describes how Runtime Encryption and Intel SGX keep a container encrypted during runtime to protect data in use from host OS, root users and network intruders, even if the infrastructure More

The post Fortanix presenting on protecting containerized apps with runtime encryption at RSAC 2018 appeared first on Help Net Security.

03:19

What patches to prioritize following the April 2018 Patch Tuesday? Help Net Security

Patch Tuesday came and went and, as usual, Microsoft and Adobe have released patches/security updates for vulnerabilities affecting a wide variety of their products. Adobes patches This April 2018 Patch Tuesday Adobe addressed vulnerabilities in Adobe PhoneGap Push Plugin, Adobe Digital Editions, Adobe InDesign, Adobe Experience Manager, and Adobe Flash Player. Of these updates, the most important one is that for Adobe Flash Player. Not only is the product the most widely used of those More

The post What patches to prioritize following the April 2018 Patch Tuesday? appeared first on Help Net Security.

03:01

Retrotechtacular: Operation Smash Hit Hackaday

Judging by the number of compilations that have been put online, one of the not-so-secret vices of the YouTube generation must be the watching of crash videos. Whether it is British drivers chancing their luck on level crossings, Russians losing it at speed on packed snow, or Americans driving tall trucks under low bridges, these films exert a compelling fascination upon the viewing public intent on deriving entertainment from the misfortunes of others. The footage is often peripheral or grainy, having inevitably been captured by a dashcam or a security camera rather than centre-stage on a broadcast quality system with professional operation. You cant predict when such things will happen.

There was one moment, back in 1984, when predicting a major crash was exactly what you could do. It was a national event, all over the TV screens, and one which was watched by millions. The operators of British nuclear power stations wished to stage a public demonstration of how robust their transport flasks for spent nuclear fuel rods were, so after all the lab tests they could throw at one they placed it on a railway test track and crashed a 100mph express train into it.

...

02:54

Wayland Gets A Meson Build System Port Phoronix

Following this week's Wayland 1.15 launch, there are now patches on the floating list to add Meson build system support to Wayland-Protocols...

02:35

"The Erotic Review" Blocks U.S. Visitors Due to SESTA SoylentNews

A sex worker review website has blocked U.S. users in anticipation of the Stop Enabling Sex-Trafficking Act (SESTA) coming into effect. U.S.-based users can still access it with a VPN, while all visitors are asked to "not access TER from a Prohibited Country":

A website that hosts customer reviews of sex workers has started blocking Internet users in the United States because of forthcoming changes in US law. Congress recently passed the Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act bill (SESTA), and President Trump is expected to sign it into law. SESTA will make it easier to prosecute websites that host third-party content that promotes or facilitates prostitution, even in cases when the sex workers aren't victims of trafficking.

After Congress approved the bill, Craigslist removed its "Personals" section and Reddit removed some sex-related subreddits. The Erotic Review (TER) has followed suit by blocking any user who appears to be visiting the website from the United States. "As a result of this new law, TER has made the difficult decision to block access to the website from the United States until such time as the courts have enjoined enforcement of the law, the law has been repealed or amended, or TER has found a way to sufficiently address any legal concerns created by the new law," the website's home page says in a notice to anyone who accesses the site from a US location.

[...] SESTA was inspired largely by the existence of Backpage. But federal law enforcement authorities were able to shut Backpage down last week, even though SESTA hasn't been signed into law yet. Trump may sign the bill this week. [...] Some sex workers have spoken out against SESTA, saying that websites can help sex workers screen clients and avoid dangerous situations. A group called Survivors Against SESTA says the new law "will cause harm to vulnerable populations engaging in the sex trade without helping trafficking victims."

Previously:...

02:22

Links 11/4/2018: Linux 3.18.104, ReactOS 0.4.8 Release Techrights

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Why is Linux Trending?

    There have been a number of highly visible, fast-moving trends in industrial automation technology over the past few years. The most notable of these has been the Internet of Things and its related mobile and remote applications. Other high-profile trends include the rise of augmented and virtual reality and the proliferation of industrial cybersecurity companies.

    Somewhat under radar, another trend has been developing. That trend is the increasing use of Linux as a leading operating system (OS) for automation controllers.

  • Desktop

    • OpenSnitch Is a Host-Based Firewall for Linux Desktops

      Simone Margaritelli, the VP of Research at Zimperium, has created a Linux port of Little Snitch, a wildly popular macOS firewall application.

      Named OpenSnitch, the Linux port works on the same principles of the macOS version, being a host-based firewall that notifies users when local apps are attempting to initiate new outgoing network connections.

      Similar to Little Snitchs normal modus operandi, when this happens, OpenSnitch will display a popup, asking the user for instructions on how to deal with this new process.

      All user decisions are saved as rules in local JSON files. Users can edit these rules later to fine-tune the firewall or import/export rules from/to other systems.

    • You Can Now Run Progressive Web Apps as Native Chrome OS Apps on Your Chromebook

      Googles Franois Beaufort recently informed the Chrome OS community about the fact that its now possible to run progressive Web Apps like native apps in Chrome OS on their Chromebooks.

      Live in the Chrome Canary experimental channel for Chrome OS, the new feature promises to let you run progressive Web Apps just l...

02:05

ThreatQ Investigations: Cybersecurity situation room accelerates security operations Help Net Security

ThreatQuotient launched ThreatQ Investigations, a cybersecurity situation room designed for collaborative threat analysis, shared understanding and coordinated response. ThreatQ Investigations allows real-time visualization of an investigation as it unfolds within a shared environment, enabling teams to better understand and anticipate threats, as well as coordinate a response. The solution, built on top of the ThreatQ threat intelligence platform, brings order to the chaos of security operations that occurs when teams work in silos, acting independently, More

The post ThreatQ Investigations: Cybersecurity situation room accelerates security operations appeared first on Help Net Security.

02:01

Syria War: Trump Says Missiles Will Be Coming cryptogon.com

Wow. This is very nuts: Russia vows to shoot down any and all missiles fired at Syria. Get ready Russia, because they will be coming, nice and new and smart! You shouldnt be partners with a Gas Killing Animal who kills his people and enjoys it! Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) April 11, 2018 Via: []

02:00

Friday Hack Chat: Talking MQTT With The Community Hackaday

The Internet of Things is just around the corner, and somehow or another, all these bits of intelligent dust and juice bag squeezers will have to talk to one another. One of the better ways to get IoT bits talking to each other is MQTT, Message Queuing Telemetry Transport, a protocol designed for small code footprints and limited network bandwidth. It gets a lot of IoT hype, but its a great alternative to HTTP for your own small projects, so thats what were talking about during this weeks Hack Chat.

MQTT is a machine-to-machine connectivity protocol, very useful in remote locations, where a small code footprint is required, where bandwidth is at a premium, or for turning a lamp on and off from your phone, while sitting in the same room. Its ideal for mobile applications, and in the twenty or so years since its creation, MQTT has made inroads into all those smart devices around your house.

MQTT is based on a very simple publish and subscribe model with topics that allow you to configure where messages should be sent. It is an extremely simple protocol, but with MQTT, you can set up a complete home automation system that...

01:30

[$] A new package index for Python LWN.net

The Python Package Index (PyPI) is the principal repository of libraries for the Python programming language, serving more than 170 million downloads each week. Fifteen years after PyPI launched, a new edition is in beta at pypi.org, with features like better search, a refreshed layout, and Markdown README files (and with some old features removed, like viewing GPG package signatures). Starting April 16, users visiting the site or running pip install will be seamlessly redirected to the new site. Two weeks after that, the legacy site is expected to be shut down and the team will turn toward new features; in the meantime, it is worth a look at what the new PyPI brings to the table.

01:22

: Machine Learning expert Peter Morgan joins our team Lifeboat News: The Blog

Wizebit is proud to welcome Machine Learning guru Peter Morgan to its elite team of blockchain specialists and developers.

Peter is the author of the popular report, Machine Learning is Changing the Rules: Ways Businesses Can Utilize AI to Innovate, and brings years of real world experience designing, building, and implementing AI and IP networks for Cisco, IBM, and BT Labs.

As the first company to create a confidential smart assistant on the blockchain, Wizebit officially launched in 2018 with the mission of allowing personal data to be connected while remaining protected.

01:15

How to verify if your Facebook data was used by Cambridge Analytica TechWorm

Want to check if Cambridge Analytica used your Facebook data, heres how

Facebook on Monday started sending a notification to users whose accounts were compromised due to the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

For those unaware, Christopher Wylie, a Cambridge University researcher, had recently revealed that data analysis firm, Cambridge Analytica and Facebook were involved in a privacy scandal wherein the former illegally lifted data of millions of Facebook users without their knowledge and consent and used it to influence voter trends in several countries. Facebook allowed thousands of app developers to harvest data through third-party online games and quizzes and then used it to target American voters with emotionally specific messaging. Facebook believes that as many as 87 million users personal data have been collected without their permission.

Those who are affected by the scandal will receive a warning for using the Cambridge Analytica app, which means they are also likely to be responsible for their friends and acquaintances data being handed over to the firm, as they are a victim by proxy.

For those, who are unaffected by the event, will receive a more general message for checking apps and websites that have access to their Facebook data.

While as promised by Facebooks CEO Mark Zuckerberg last week, the notifications that appear at the top of News Feed of the user have started rolling out, but it appears to be slow.

In the meanwhile, you can manually check the information by visiting Facebooks support page titled How can I tell if my info was shared with Cambridge Analytica? which will provide a more immediate response.

A box labeled Was my information shared? on that page will display the results for the currently logged-in user. The contents of the box will change depending on if the user accessed the banned site, if their friends logged in, or if their data is safe.

If your data wasnt compromised, you will see a message that reads: Based on our available records, neither you nor your friends logged into This Is Your Digital Life. As a result, it doesnt appear your Facebook information was shared with Cambridge Analytica by This Is Your Digital Life.

If your data was harvested, you will see a message that reads: A friend of yours did log in. In this case, it is likely that your public profile, in addition to your page likes, your birthday, current city and probably also your News Feed were likely shared with This Is Your Digital Life. Of an estimated 87 million worldwide, about one million people in the UK will see the second message.

In the event, you were the one to install the app This Is Your Digital Life, you will receive a message that reads: If you see this message, you were probably responsible fo...

01:07

How security researchers deal with risks stemming from their activities Help Net Security

Broad and inconsistent interpretations of behind the times laws, new anti-infosec legislation, lawsuits and criminal prosecutions are having a chilling effect on security research. Its difficult to quantify the effect, but Joseph Lorenzo Hall and Stan Adams of the US-based non-profit Center for Democracy & Technology have attempted to reveal the worries and choices of security researchers in the current climate by interviewing twenty of them. We used a qualitative methods research design to understand More

The post How security researchers deal with risks stemming from their activities appeared first on Help Net Security.

01:05

Real-World Build Tips for Yocto

Title: 
Real-World Build Tips for Yocto

01:02

Why the fuss about nurdles? Lifeboat News: The Blog

Nurdles. The name sounds inoffensive, cuddly even However, nurdles are anything but. Nurdle is the colloquial name for pre-production plastic pellets (which is in itself rather a mouthful); these are the raw material of the plastic industry the building blocks for plastic bottles, plastic bags, drinking straws, car components, computer keyboards in fact almost anything you can think of thats made of plastic.

However, nurdles are also covering our beaches. I found that out for myself when Fauna & Flora International (FFI) first started researching this issue in 2009. Having read about them I went looking on my local beach, and was shocked to find so many nurdles in the strandline and trapped in washed-up seaweed. I had never noticed them before, but they had clearly been accumulating for some time.

While pictures of the tide of larger plastics in the ocean are front page news, the issue of nurdle pollution has received much less attention. Recent storms, however, have resulted in higher levels of nurdles being reported from a range of sites around UK coasts, highlighting the numbers of nurdles that are in our waterways, seas and sediments a level of pollution which we can only see when they are flushed out and onto the beach. The Great Nurdle Hunt (an initiative of our partner Fidra) has mapped nurdle finds from around the UK and Europe, which has identified a number of nurdle hotspots in key industrial estuaries. However, this problem isnt unique to Europe; nurdles are reported worldwide, but only hit the headlines when there are significant local spills from containers lost at sea, as recently occurred in South Africa. However, such one-off events arent the only source of nurdle pollution.

01:02

Robust and inexpensive catalysts for hydrogen production Lifeboat News: The Blog

Researchers from the Ruhr University Bochum (RUB) and the University of Warwick were able to observe the smallest details of hydrogen production with the synthetic mineral pentlandite. This makes it possible to develop strategies for the design of robust and cost-effective catalysts for hydrogen production. The working groups of Prof. Wolfgang Schuhmann and Dr. Ulf-Peter Apfel from the RUB and the team headed by Prof. Patrick R. Unwin from the University of Warwick published their results in the journal Angewandte Chemie.

Hydrogen gas is considered a possible future source of energy and can be produced from water using platinum catalysts and electricity. However, researchers seek alternative catalysts made of cheaper and more readily available with equally high efficiency. There are a number of materials that, like platinum, are able to catalyse the reaction of water into hydrogen. These include metal chalcogenides such as the mineral pentlandite, which is just as efficient as platinum and is also significantly more stable toward poisons such as sulphur, explains Ulf-Peter Apfel. Pentlandite consists of iron, nickel and sulphur. Its structure is similar to that of the catalytic centres of hydrogen-producing enzymes found in a variety of sources, including green algae.

In the current study, the researchers investigated rates of artificially prepared crystalline surfaces of the mineral pentlandite in a drop of liquid with a diameter of a few hundred nanometres. They used scanning electrochemical cell microscopy for this purpose.

01:02

The Life Extension is Just a Fear of Death Argument Lifeboat News: The Blog

This is a fairly common response to the discussion of extending healthy human lifespans. The idea that fear of dying is the only thing that motivates the advocates, supporters, and scientists working on rejuvenation biotechnology and ending age-related diseases.


These days, war is not really portrayed in a very good light. When we think about war, we think about genocide, mass murder, and slaughter, and we call for an end to it. The popular sentiment is that war is bad and we should just do away with it. However, once upon a time, things were rather different, and soldiers fighting wars were not seen as victims of mindless violence. Losing your life in battle was considered glorious and noble, and your family would be proud of you for fighting in the name of your country, your God, or whatever. People who were afraid of dying and refused to fight were regarded as cowards, most certainly not as pacifists of a strong moral fiber, and were possibly executed; being a conscientious objector was not yet a thing, and human rights werent either.

This is sheer madness to us, but back in the day, it was entirely normal. Most of us will probably think people must have been crazy to let themselves be fooled into believing such nonsense, but thats the power of propaganda for you.

The modern age of pro-death propaganda

However, the story is not completely over even today. This may be because of past glorification of death, stale ideas about the circle of life, a widespread coping mechanism, or a combination of the three, but at least in certain circumstances, being afraid of death is still seen as a sign of cowardice and sometimes also inferiority.

01:01

Whatever You Do, Don't Give This Programmable Payment Card to Your Waiter SoylentNews

Fuze card is wide open to data theft over Bluetooth. A fix is on the way.

The makers of the programmable Fuze smart card say it's powerful enough to be your wallet in one card yet secure enough to be used the same way as traditional payment cardsincluding trusting it to restaurant servers when paying the bill. But it turns out that convenience comes with a major catch. A flaw makes it possible for anyone with even brief physical control of the card to surreptitiously siphon all data stored on the device.

Fuze representatives said they're aware of the vulnerability and plan to fix it in an update scheduled for April 19. They also thanked the two researchers who, independent of one another, discovered the vulnerability and privately reported it. So far, however, Fuze officials have yet to fully inform users of the extent of the risk so they can prevent private data stored on the cards from being stolen or tampered with until the critical flaw is repaired.

Read more of this story at SoylentNews.

01:00

Practical Plasma for Thin-Film Deposition Hackaday

[Nixie] wants to sputter. We know, who doesnt? But [Nixie] has a specific purpose for his sputtering: thin-film deposition, presumably in support of awesome science. But getting to that point requires a set of tools that arent exactly off-the-shelf items, so hes building out a DIY sputtering rig on the cheap.

If youre not familiar with sputtering, thats understandable. In this context, sputtering is a process that transfers particles from one solid to another by bombarding the first solid with some sort of energetic particles, usually electrons or a plasma. When properly controlled, sputtering has applications from mass spectrometry to the semiconductor industry, where its used to either deposit thin films on silicon wafers or etch them away selectively.

No matter the application, sputtering needs a stable stream of plasma. [Nixie] has posted a series of articles on his blog walking us through his plasma experiments, from pulling a really strong vacuum to building a high-voltage power supply from a microwave oven transformer. Its a project that needs a deep well of skills and tools, like glassworking, machining, and high-voltage electronics. Check out the plasma in the video below.

Will [Nixie] be using this for a DIY fab lab? Will it be used to make homebrew LEDs? The world waits to hear.

00:50

Khronos Officially Announces Its LLVM/SPIR-V Translator Phoronix

The Khronos Group has officially announced the long-awaited open-source availability of their SPIRV-LLVM-Translator that allows the bi-directional translation of SPIR-V and LLVM IR...

00:48

Security updates for Wednesday LWN.net

Security updates have been issued by Debian (pcs), Fedora (drupal7), openSUSE (git and mercurial), Red Hat (firefox and qemu-kvm-rhev), SUSE (libvirt and xen), and Ubuntu (patch).

00:42

Energy injustice? Cost, availability of energy-efficient lightbulbs vary with poverty levels Lifeboat News: The Blog

Energy-efficient lightbulbs are more expensive and less available in high-poverty urban areas than in more affluent locations, according to a new University of Michigan study conducted in Wayne County.

U-M researchers explored disparities in the availability and price of energy-efficient bulbs by surveying 130 stores across Michigans most populous county.

They found that the cost to upgrade from a conventional incandescent bulb to a highly efficient light-emitting diode, or LED, was twice as high in the highest-poverty areas. At the same time, the price for less-efficient incandescent and halogen lamps (IHLs) decreased as the poverty level increased.

00:01

Hacking When It Counts: Pigeon-Guided Missiles Hackaday

The image of the crackpot inventor, disheveled, disorganized, and surrounded by the remains of his failures, is an enduring Hollywood trope. While a simple look around ones shop will probably reveal how such stereotypes get started, the image is largely not a fair characterization of the creative mind and how it works, and does not properly respect those that struggle daily to push the state of the art into uncharted territory.

That said, there are plenty of wacky ideas that have come down the pike, most of which mercifully fade away before attracting undue attention. In times of war, though, the need for new and better ways to blow each other up tends to bring out the really nutty ideas and lower the barrier to revealing them publically, or at least to military officials.

Of all the zany plans that came from the fertile minds on each side of World War II, few seem as out there as a plan to use birds to pilot bombs to their targets. And yet such a plan was not only actively developed, it came from the fertile mind of one of the 20th centurys most brilliant psychologists, and very nearly resulted in a fieldable weapon that would let fly the birds of war.

Feedback Control

After graduating from college in 1926, Burrhus Frederic Skinner was a bit of a lost soul. He had had every intention of being a writer, but nothing seemed to be coming from his efforts. Living in his parents Pennsylvania home, he decided to scrap his plan of writing the Great American Novel and return to school.

Inspired by the works of Pavlov and Watson, which he browsed while working at a bookstore to make ends meet, B.F. Skinner applied to the Psychology Department of Harvard University in 1926. Skinner was interested in making psychology an experimental science, and rather than the concentrate on exploring the mind, he was determined to only study what could be quantified. Rather than trying to delve into the subjective world of thoughts and emotions, he decided to study behaviors.

Anyone who has taken an introductory psychology course will be familiar with operant conditioning, the term Skinner came up with to describe one way that animals learn. The idea with operant conditioning is that behaviors are either reinforced or discouraged by what happens as a result of the behavior. The classic case occurs in the Skinner Box, an invention of his. In the simplest case, a rat placed in the box can be trained to press a lever by the release of a food pellet, or can be discouraged from pressing the lever by getting an electric shock through the cage floor. Operant conditioning differs from classical conditioning, such as in the case of Pavlovs famously drooling dogs, in that the latter makes an association between stimulus and an involuntary response, like salivating at the sound of a bell, while the former deals with voluntary behaviors, like pressing a leve...

00:00

NVIDIA 396.18 Linux Benchmarks, Testing Their New Vulkan SPIR-V Compiler Phoronix

Yesterday NVIDIA released their first 396 Linux driver beta in the form of the 396.18 release and its biggest addition is a new Vulkan SPIR-V compiler to replace the compiler that's been hobbled together since the Vulkan 1.0 debut. Here are some fresh NVIDIA Vulkan Linux benchmarks and more on this new SPIR-V compiler.

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Wednesday, 11 April

23:52

USPTO Will Have a Crisis of Legitimacy If Its Officials Work as Lobbyists and Cooperate With Villainous Think Tanks Techrights

[Y]oure creating a new 20-year monopoly for no good reason.

David Kappos, former Director of the USPTO

Summary: The latest examples of Andrei Iancu and David Kappos (current and former USPTO Directors, respectively) found in bed with the patent microcosm (like the disgraced Judge Rader and unlike Michelle Lee, whom the patent microcosm constantly smeared to eventually oust)

THE EPO scandals are many. Too many to count. Theres danger, however, that similar scandals will spread to the US (we wrote about some appointments by nepotism recently, including the CIO and the new chief, whose firm used to work for Donald Trump).

Heres the latest gossip from the Office. Its less than a day old. Its about Pam Isom, who is said to have hired her nephew by marriage:

According to these Highlights (highlighted by...

23:31

Study Claims That Company Insiders Are Behind 1 in 4 Data Breaches SoylentNews

The admins among you will be unsurprised to discover that, more than a quarter of the time, data breaches across the world originated between the chair and the keyboard of organisation "insiders". And no, we don't mean they clicked on a dodgy link...

The latest edition of Verizon's Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR) found that 25 per cent of all attacks over the year were perpetrated by said insiders and were driven largely by financial gain, espionage and simple mistakes or misuse.

It also reports that organised criminal groups continue to be behind around half of all breaches, while state-affiliated groups were involved in more than one in 10. Financial gain, unsurprisingly, continued to be the top motivation for cybercriminals.

The healthcare industry was found to be at particularly high risk of insider threats through errors and employee misuse such as medical workers accessing patient records for simple curiosity or fun.

Read more of this story at SoylentNews.

23:10

Changing Healthcare with Blockchain Technology

Blockchain technology is heralded to become a broadly disruptive force in the coming years. According to a Forbes story, blockchain is already revolutionizing contracts, payment processing, asset protection, and supply chain management.

23:09

"Quasi-Non-Volatile" Memory Looks to Fill Gap Between Volatile and Non-Volatile Memory IEEE Spectrum Recent Content full text

2D materials produce a semi-floating gate memory that falls somewhere between DRAM and SRAM Image: School of Microelectronics, Fudan University This schematic shows the design for a new semi-floating gate memory.

Researchers at Fudan University in Shanghai, China have leveraged two-dimensional (2D) materials to fabricate a relatively new gate design for transistors that may fill the gap between volatile and non-volatile memory.

The result is what the researchers are dubbing a quasi-non-volatile device that combines the benefits of static random access memory (SRAM) and dynamic random access memory (DRAM). The new device will make up for DRAMs limited data retention ability and its need to be frequently refreshed and SRAMs high cost.

In research described in Nature Nanotechnology , the Chinese researchers leveraged a gate design that has been gaining popularity, recently called semi-floating gate (SFG) memory technology. The SFG gate design is similar to a typical field effect transistor except that SFG transistor can remember the applied voltage from the gate.

The researchers have shown that the 2D SFG memory they have fabricated has 156 times longer refresh time (10 seconds) than DRAM (64 milliseconds), which saves power, and ultrahigh-speed writing operations on nanosecond timescales (15 nanoseconds), which puts it on par with DRAM (10 nanoseconds). This new device also boosts the writing operation performance to approximately 106 times faster than other memories based on 2D materials.

These improvements to refresh time and writing operations suggest that the quasi-non-volatile memory has the potential to bridge the gap between volatile and non-volatile memory technologies and decrease the power consumption demanded by frequent refresh operations, enabling a high-speed and low-power random access memory.

The first floating gate transistor was made in 1967 and since then has become a mainstay of nonvolatile memory technology. However, the writing/erasing speed of a floating gate transistor is around one millisecond, making it slower than the CPU, prohibiting its use where a high writing speed is needed.

The researchers saw that there was a chance to improve the performance of a floating gate transistor because so much of its performance is based on its...

22:46

FIDO2: Authenticate easily with phishing-resistant security Help Net Security

The FIDO Alliance and the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) have achieved a standards milestone in the global effort to bring simpler yet stronger web authentication to users around the world. The W3C has advanced Web Authentication (WebAuthn), a collaborative effort based on Web API specifications submitted by FIDO to the W3C, to the Candidate Recommendation (CR) stage. The CR is the product of the Web Authentication Working Group, which is comprised of representatives from More

The post FIDO2: Authenticate easily with phishing-resistant security appeared first on Help Net Security.

22:25

More GNOME Performance Improvements Are On The Way Phoronix

While it unfortunately didn't happen in time for last month's GNOME 3.28 release, there are more performance improvements en route...

22:19

New ransomware locks files & asks victims to play PUBG game HackRead

By Waqas

Another day, another ransomware scam but this one is harmless

This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: New ransomware locks files & asks victims to play PUBG game

22:14

Oblivious DNS: A Genuinely Secure DNS SoylentNews

The Domain Name System (DNS) is a plain-text service that lets anyone who can see the wire capture a user's DNS traffic and work out whether they're asking for naughty.com or nice.com. So to help enhance its privacy a group of researchers has proposed a more "Oblivious DNS protocol.

However, as the group explained here, even encrypted DNS (for example, DNS over TLS) is still exposed at the recursive resolver (that is, the DNS component most directly connected to the client), because that server decrypts the user request so it can fetch the IP address of the site the user wants.

In other words, whether you use your ISP's resolver, or one provided by a third party like Google or Cloudflare, at some point you have to trust the resolver with your DNS requests.

Read more of this story at SoylentNews.

22:05

An apology to my Facebook followers Graham Cluley

An apology to my Facebook followers

Quitting Facebook is hard enough for many people, I dont want to give anybody another reason to stay.

21:45

How many can detect a major cybersecurity incident within an hour? Help Net Security

Less than half of all organizations were able to detect a major cybersecurity incident within one hour. Even more concerning, less than one-third said that even if they detected a major incident, they would be unable to contain it within an hour, according to LogRhythm. Average time to detect a major cybersecurity incident The study, conducted by Widmeyer, which surveyed 751 IT decision makers from the U.S., U.K. and Asia-Pacific, also revealed that a majority More

The post How many can detect a major cybersecurity incident within an hour? appeared first on Help Net Security.

21:30

Organizations want to leverage the cloud but are held back by security misconceptions Help Net Security

iboss has published the findings of its 2018 Enterprise Cloud Trends report. The survey of IT decision makers and office workers in U.S. enterprises found that 64% of IT decision makers believe the pace of software as a service (SaaS) application adoption is outpacing their cybersecurity capabilities. Combined with growing pressures from shadow IT and mobile employees, 91% of IT decision makers agree they need to update security policies to operate in a cloud-first environment. More

The post Organizations want to leverage the cloud but are held back by security misconceptions appeared first on Help Net Security.

21:27

DevOps, Machine Learning Dominate Technology Opportunities This Year

Latest Stack Overflow survey of 100,000-plus developers finds the highest salaries and interest levels in DevOps methodologies and artificial intelligence.

21:18

Make your First Contribution to an Open Source Project

In this article, I'll provide a checklist of beginner-friendly features and some tips to make your first open source contribution easy.

Understand the product

Before contributing to a project, you should understand how it works. To understand it, you need to try it for yourself. If you find the product interesting and useful, it is worth contributing to.

21:00

Redirected Walking in VR done via Exploit of Eyeballs Hackaday

[Anjul Patney] and [Qi Sun] demonstrated a fascinating new technique at NVIDIAs GPU Technology Conference (GTC) for tricking a human into thinking a VR space is larger than it actually is. The way it works is this: when a person walks around in VR, they invariably make turns. During these turns, its possible to fool the person into thinking they have pivoted more or less than they have actually physically turned. With a way to manipulate perception of turns comes a way for software to gently manipulate a persons perception of how large a virtual space is. Unlike other methods that rely on visual distortions, this method is undetectable by the viewer.

Saccadic movements

The software essentially exploits a quirk of how our eyes work. When a humans eyes move around to look at different things, the eyeballs dont physically glide smoothly from point to point. The eyes make frequent but unpredictable darting movements called saccades. There are a number of deeply interesting things about saccades, but the important one here is the fact that our eyes essentially go offline during saccadic movement. Our vision is perceived as a smooth and unbroken stream, but thats a result of the brain stitching visual information into a cohesive whole, and filling in blanks without us being aware of it.

Part one of [Anjul] and [Qi]s method is to manipulate perception of a virtual area relative to actual physical area by mak...

20:52

AMD and Microsoft release microcode and operating system updates against Spectre flaw Security Affairs

AMD released patches for Spectre Variant 2 attack that includes both microcode and operating system updates. AMD and Microsoft worked together to issue the updates on Tuesday.

AMD and Microsoft released the microcode and security updates for Spectre vulnerabilities.

The Meltdown and Spectre attacks could be exploited by attackers to bypass memory isolation mechanisms and access target sensitive data.

The Meltdown attack could allow attackers to read the entire physical memory of the target machines stealing credentials, personal information, and more.

The Meltdown exploits the speculative execution to breach the isolation between user applications and the operating system, in this way any application can access all system memory.

The Spectre attack allows user-mode applications to extract information from other processes running on the same system. It can also be exploited to extract information from its own process via code, for example, a malicious JavaScript can be used to extract login cookies for other sites from the browsers memory.

The attack breaks the isolation between different applications, allowing to leak information from the kernel to user programs, as well as from virtualization hypervisors to guest systems.

amd spectre flaw

Meltdown attacks trigger the CVE-2017-5754 vulnerability, while Spectre attacks the CVE-2017-5753 (Variant 1) and CVE-2017-5715 (Variant 2). According to the experts, only Meltdown and Sp...

20:50

Multiple vulnerabilities in Jenkins Open Source Security

Posted by Daniel Beck on Apr 11

Jenkins is an open source automation server which enables developers around
the world to reliably build, test, and deploy their software. The following
releases contain fixes for security vulnerabilities:

* Jenkins (weekly) 2.116
* Jenkins (LTS) 2.107.2

Summaries of the vulnerabilities are below. More details, severity, and
attribution can be found here:
https://jenkins.io/security/advisory/2018-04-11/

We provide advance notification for...

20:42

Untethered: Wireless Power Transmission Will Make Robots Hard to Stop SoylentNews

Submitted via IRC for AndyTheAbsurd

A new device allows robots used in warehouses and third-party logistics (3PL) facilities to draw power or recharge batteries wirelessly while in operation.

The technology could have a big impact on the capabilities of mobile industrial robots, potentially freeing them from limitations imposed by modern batteries.

Waypoint Robotics, which makes custom mobile robots for the supply chain industry, unveiled its EnZone Wireless Charging Dock at this year's MODEX, the largest supply chain expo in North & South America and the hottest ticket in town this week for the mobile robotics industry.

The underlying technology for the wireless charging system comes from partner WiBotic, which makes plug-and-play devices for the wireless transmission of power to robotic platforms.

Last year, WiBotic made a splash with a wireless charging pad it claims can keep drones in the air indefinitely. That capability could prove indispensable if drone delivery takes off the way many analysts believe it will.

Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/untethered-wireless-power-transmission-will-make-robots-hard-to-stop/


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20:19

GIMP Punts Painting Off To Separate Thread Phoronix

As a long overdue move, the GIMP image manipulation program now has support for moving the painting process off to a separate CPU thread...

20:10

How to Install Rancher Docker Container Manager on Ubuntu

If you're looking to take your container management to the next level, the Rancher Docker Container Manager might be just what you need. Jack Wallen shows you how to get this up and running.

You've been working with containers for some time nowmaybe you're using docker commands to manage and deploy those containers. You're not ready to migrate to Kubernetes (and Docker has been treating you well), but you'd like to make use of a handy web-based management tool to make your container life a bit easier. Where do you turn?

19:56

Igalia Preps 16-bit Integer Support For Intel's Vulkan Driver Phoronix

Igalia developers have been working on shaderInt16 support Intel's open-source "ANV" Vulkan driver to provide 16-bit integer support...

19:43

Plymouth Adds Device Rotation Support Phoronix

Commits these days to Plymouth are fairly rare with this Red Hat developed project seeing its first commits of 2018 yesterday...

19:30

[SECURITY] [DSA 4169-1] pcs security update Bugtraq

Posted by Yves-Alexis Perez on Apr 11

-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Debian Security Advisory DSA-4169-1 security () debian org
https://www.debian.org/security/ Yves-Alexis Perez
April 11, 2018 https://www.debian.org/security/faq
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Package : pcs
CVE ID : CVE-2018-1086
Debian Bug : 895313...

19:10

Understanding The Basics Of The Artificial Neural Network SoylentNews

Imagine the neural network (NN) as a black box inside a space with internal functions, inputs, and outputs. All its outputs are dependent on the inputs with a unique idea: auto-training.

Inside the software, every possible function points in the direction of the existence of the network. As for its intelligence, it's undeterminable, an open question. But the human brain, whose intelligence is very high, can be investigated for patterns.

[...] Using an innovative artificial intelligence tool, the NN learns how to generate contextually relevant reviews. For example, if we ask for the best food around us, the system will answer. But the language will include various adjectives, which are not consistent with our way of talking.

If we use every single input available for a valuable result, then high performance could be obtained.

The network's perception of the interaction with our world has its own way of existence. If the machine remembers pleasant emotions of a man drinking his coffee, it can store those feelings in relation to the activity.

It is, now, possible, to see more clearly how this form of artificial intelligence builds consciousness. The NN can gradually build egos and make judgments by itself, from the stimuli it receives.

The NN is not programmed to obey the rules of the language's syntax. That is why it is so different - the complexity of a robot's mind, without any rules.

https://www.evolving-science.com/information-communication/understanding-basics-artificial-neural-network-00618


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18:55

More SCOTUS Patent Cases on Their Way, But Nothing That Will Change 35 U.S.C. 101/Alice Techrights

American pride

Summary: In spite of the continued assessment of patent law at the US Supreme Court (SCOTUS), things wont change in favour of the software patents lobby any time soon (if ever)

THE (arguably) most anticipated patent decision from SCOTUS is (probably) Oil States. Just under a year ago we saw yet more favourable (to patent reform) decisions from SCOTUS. Expect more of the same later this month or next month.

Another possible case (to reach SCOTUS) is a high-profile case regarding patents, but it not about patent scope (Alice has already settled much of that) or litigation venue scope (TC Heartland dealt with it last summer/spring). Earlier this week Patently-O wrote about it:

Helsinns petition for certiorari received strong support this week from a bevy of ten briefs amici. The missing element now is a call from the Supreme Court for the views of the Solicitor General (CVSG) and a resulting brief from the U.S. Government supporting the petition.

The Patent Act bars the patenting of inventions that were on sale prior to to the inventions filing date. The question on appeal here is whether the AIA limited on sale to only include publicly available information or instead do secret and confidential business deals also count as invalidating prior art (if ever discovered).

This case isnt of much interest to us, but still, it can help show where SCOTUS stands (or sits) on patents. Writing about this other case which isn't of much interest to us, SCOTUS Blog has just said:

On the first morning of the Supreme Courts April session next week, the justices will return to problems of extraterritorial patent infringement, hearing argument in WesternGeco v Ion Geophysical Corp. For the third time in recent years, the court will consider Section 271 of the Patent Act. The statute was adopted in response to the courts 1972 holding in Deepsouth Packing v...

18:45

Anaconda, CPython, PyPy, and more: Know Your Python Distributions

When you choose Python for software development, you choose a large language ecosystem with a wealth of packages covering all manner of programming needs. But in addition to libraries for everything from GUI development to machine learning, you can also choose from a number of Python runtimesand some of these runtimes may be better suited to the use case you have at hand than others.

18:42

Beyond the Milky Way: The sublime beauty of our galactic neighbors Lifeboat News: The Blog

Over the 20th century our knowledge of the universe expanded, as did our technological ability to capture images its outer reaches. The Hubble Space Telescope allowed us to pull back the curtains on the deep limits of the universe and the new millennium promises an even higher definition imaging with the James Webb Space Telescope.

Despite ongoing delays, the JWT promises to take us even closer to the edge of time and space, delivering a new perspective on some of the oldest galaxies in the universe, potentially just a few hundred million years after the big bang.

18:36

Microsoft April Patch Tuesday Update your system now to avoid being hacked by visiting a site Security Affairs

 

Microsoft has released April Patch Tuesday security updates that address 66 vulnerabilities, five of them could be exploited by an attacker to compromise a PC by just tricking the victims into visiting a website or opening a specifically crafted file.

Hackers can compromise your computer just visiting a malicious website or clicking a malicious link.

Microsoft has released April Patch Tuesday that addresses 66 vulnerabilities, 24 of which are rated critical and five of them could be exploited by an attacker to compromise a PC by just tricking the victims into visiting a website or opening a specifically crafted file.

Microsoft April Patch Tuesday includes the fix for five critical remote code execution vulnerabilities in Windows Graphics Component (CVE-2018-1010-1012-1013-1015-1016) that are related to improper handling of embedded fonts by the Font Library.

In a web-based attack scenario, an attacker could host a specially crafted website that is designed to exploit the vulnerability through Internet Explorer and then convince a user to view the website, reads the advisory for the CVE-2018-1013.

An attacker could also embed an ActiveX control marked safe for initialization in an application or Microsoft Office document that hosts the IE rendering engine.

The flaws were discovered by Hossein Lotfi, a security researcher at Flexera Software. and affect all versions of Windows OS to date.

Microsoft also addressed a denial of service vulnerability in Windows Microsoft Graphics that could be exploited by an attacker to cause a targeted system to stop responding. This vulnerability tied the way Windows handles objects in memory.

Microsoft April Patch Tuesday also addressed a critical RCE vulnerability, tracked as CVE-2018-1004, that resides in the Windows VBScript Engine and affects all versions of Windows.

An attacker who successfully exploited the vulnerability could gain the same user rights as the current user. If the current user is logged on with administrative user rights, an attacker who successfully exploited the vulnerability c...

18:25

One Last Battistelli Heist: Millions of Euros for Saint-Germain-en-Laye Techrights

By sheer coincidence (another one of those!) all the EPO budget will flow into the town where Battistelli is a politician just 3 weeks before his departure

Saint-Germain-en-Laye event

Summary: The tyrant who destroyed the EPO and built himself a palace using millions which were supposed to go to a contractor in another country is engaging in dubious financial affairs again (akin to his padrone, Nicolas Sarkozy, who has been charged with corruption)

THE EPO lacks a sense of humility and shame. The management is so deeply corrupt that its attacking anyone who dares point it out.

The finalists will be announced on 24 April, the EPO wrote yesterday about the European Inventor Award 2018 (warning: epo.org link) and the location can be confirmed. It says very clearly: The next edition of the European Inventor Award will be held on 7 June 2018 in Paris, Saint-Germain-en-Laye.

SUEPO now points out that even his successor, whom he chose (another Frenchman with zero background in sciences), isnt being trusted by stakeholders, based on a new JUVE poll. The culture of nepotism is almost assured to prevail.That Battistelli takes EPO budget 'home' just 3 weeks before leaving isnt new to us. We wrote about it before. That hes leaving the EPO in ruins is also without doubt. SUEPO now points out that even his successor, whom he chose (another Frenchman with zero background in sciences), isnt being trusted by stakeholders, based on a new JUVE poll. The culture of nepotism is almost assured to prevail.

Heres the EPO (...

18:00

Emulating OBD-II on the ESP32 Hackaday

It used to be that you could pop the hood and with nothing more than flat head screwdriver, some baling wire, and tongue held at the optimal angle, you could fix anything that ailed your car. But today, for better or for worse, the average automobile is a rolling computer that runs on gasoline and hope (if it even still has a gasoline engine, that is). DIY repairs and maintenance on a modern car is still possible of course, but the home mechanics toolbox has needed to evolve with the times. If you want to do anything more advanced than changing a tire, youll really want to have the gear to interface with the vehicles computer via the OBD-II port.

But for some, even that isnt enough. [limiter121] recently wrote in to tell us of an interesting project which doesnt read the OBD-II port in a vehicle, but actually emulates one. Like so many others this hack was born out of necessity, as a way to test an OBD-II project without having to sit out in the driveway all day. It allows you to create fictitious speed and engine RPM values for the OBD-II device or software under test to read, complete with a slick web interface to control the car.

So what makes it tick? Surprisingly little, actually. At the most basic level, an ESP32-WROOM-32 is connected up to a SN65HVD230 CAN transceiver chip. Youll also need a 3.3V power supply, as well as a USB to serial adapter to do the initial programming on the ESP32. From there its just a matter of compiling and flash...

17:59

Reddit Copyright Complaints Jump 138% But Almost Half Get Rejected TorrentFreak

So-called transparency reports are becoming increasingly popular with Internet-based platforms and their users. Among other things, they provide much-needed insight into how outsiders attempt to censor content published online and what actions are taken in response.

Google first started publishing its report in 2010, Twitter followed in 2012, and theyve now been joined by a multitude of major companies including Microsoft, Facebook and Cloudflare.

As one of the worlds most recognized sites, Reddit joined the transparency party fairly late, publishing its first report in early 2015. While light on detail, it revealed that in the previous year the site received just 218 requests to remove content, 81% of which were DMCA-style copyright notices. A significant 62% of those copyright-related requests were rejected.

Over time, Reddits reporting has become a little more detailed. Last April it revealed that in 2016, the platform received just 3,294 copyright removal requests for the entire year. However, what really caught the eye is how many notices were rejected. In just 610 instances, Reddit was required to remove content from the site, a rejection rate of 81%.

Having been a year since Reddits last report, the company has just published its latest edition, covering the period January 1, 2017 to December 31, 2017.

Reddit publishes this transparency report every year as part of our ongoing commitment to keep you aware of the trends on the various requests regarding private Reddit user account information or removal of content posted to Reddit, the company said in a statement.

Reddit believes that maintaining this transparency is extremely important. We want you to be aware of this information, consider it carefully, and ask questions to keep us accountable.

The detailed report covers a wide range of topics, including government requests for the preservation or production of user information (there were 310) and even an instruction to monitor one Reddit users activities in real time via a so-called Trap and Trace order.

In copyright terms, there has been significant movement. In 2017, Reddit received 7,825 notifications of alleged copyright infringement under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, thats up roughly 138% over the 3,294 notifications received in 2016.

For a platform of Reddits unquestionable size, these volumes are not big. While the massive percentage increase is notable, t...

17:38

Bowhead Whales, The 'Jazz Musicians' Of The Arctic, Sing Many Different Songs SoylentNews

Spring is the time of year when birds are singing throughout the Northern Hemisphere. Far to the north, beneath the ice, another lesser-known concert season in the natural world is just coming to an end.

A University of Washington study has published the largest set of recordings for bowhead whales, to discover that these marine mammals have a surprisingly diverse, constantly shifting vocal repertoire. The study published April 4 in Biology Letters, a journal of the United Kingdom's Royal Society, analyzed audio recordings gathered year-round east of Greenland. This population of bowhead whales was hunted almost to extinction in the 1600s and was recently estimated at about 200 animals. Audio recordings gathered from 2010 to 2014 indicate a healthy population, and include 184 different songs.

"If humpback whale song is like classical music, bowheads are jazz," said lead author Kate Stafford, an oceanographer at the UW's Applied Physics Laboratory. "The sound is more freeform. And when we looked through four winters of acoustic data, not only were there never any song types repeated between years, but each season had a new set of songs."

Stafford has recorded whales' sounds throughout the world's oceans as a way to track and study marine mammals. She first detected bowhead whales singing off the other side of Greenland in 2007. A previous study by Stafford of the Spitsbergen whales off west Greenland reported in 2012 that the whales were singing continuously during the winter breeding season, the first hint that there may be a healthy population in that area.

"We were hoping when we put the hydrophone out that we might hear a few sounds," Stafford said of the earlier study. "When we heard, it was astonishing: Bowhead whales were singing loudly, 24 hours a day, from November until April. And they were singing many, many different songs."

The new paper extends that initial five-month dataset, and confirms that bowhead whales sing in this region regularly from late fall to early spring. In fact the hydrophones, which are underwater microphones, picked up slightly more singing in the later years of the study. But what was most remarkable was the relentless variety in the animals' songs, or distinct musical phrases.


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17:00

Fuelling the future Terra Forming Terra



Worthwhile essay and says much about how the narrative was managed during the past century.

Yet the real future will be powered by locally accessing energy potential from static electricity and Dark Matter.  This was done first with Tesla's device although he did not know what i just described.

That basically means a not so simple device will flood any particular circuit with all the load energy it demands.  kiss  off traditional energy taxation as presently practiced.



Fuelling the future

Fantasies about new power sources for human ambitions go back a century or more. Could these past visions energise our own future?

From George Griffiths 1893 novel, The Angel of the Revolution. Photo courtesy Archive.org

Iwan Rhys Morus is professor of history at Aberystwyth University in Wales. He is the editor of The Oxford Illustrated History of Science (2017), and his biography of the inventor of the fuel cell, William Robert Grove, is forthcoming.

https://aeon.co/essays/how-science-fiction-feeds-the-fuel-solutions-of-the-future

In his short story Let There Be Light, the science-fiction author Robert A Heinlein introduced the energy source that would power his Future History series of stories and novels. First published in Super Science Storiesmagazine in May 1940, it described the Douglas-Martin sunpower screens that would provide (almost) free and inexhaustible energy to fuel the future in subsequent instalments of his alternative timeline. It was simple, robust and reliable technology. We can bank em in series to get any required voltage; we can bank in parallel to get any required current, and the power is absolutely free, except for the inst...

17:00

New evidence about the ancient humans who occupied Asia is cascading in: Terra Forming Terra




 So far what is confirmed is that hominids covered the earth for a long time approaching millions of years, making the human timelines at least prospective.  Yet a couple of teeth does indicate something that is earlier than the well shown explosion of humanity around 60,000 years ago.

What is also missing is any evidence of advanced humanity that is post stone age technology except again in the form of oddities all controversial over all prehistory before 60,000 BC.

It is all too tentative and those teeth could well be an important hominid variant then absorbed into our lineage..

 We understand the 140,000 year pause in Africa based on use of mind to mind communication then lost 45,000 years ago preceded by a 15000 year movement to distribute throughout Eurasia.  This allowed interbreeding with local hominids to take place before the cut off of communication made this almost impossible.
 .

.
New evidence about the ancient humans who occupied Asia is cascading in: the story of our species

https://aeon.co/essays/new-evidence-about-the-human-occupation-of-asia-is-cascading-in?

Modern humans arose only once, in Africa, about 200,000 years ago. They then spread across Eurasia some time after 60,000 years ago, replacing whatever indigenous populations they met with no interbreeding. This is the Out of Africa model, as its commonly known. In the 1990s, the hypothesis found widespread acceptance by palaeoanthropologists, especially when the first analyses of Neanderthal DNA seemed to indicate that Neanderthals and modern humans did not interbreed. But...

17:00

Qanon - China changes Auto Tarrifs. MSM Blinks Terra Forming Terra





 Eventually folks will get used to Trump's negotiating style.  He always starts by lowering the boom however irrational.  Negotiations begin which was the whole point after all and something acceptable gets hammered out.  It just happened with China.  From this watch Japan come to its senses as well.

It should also be obvious by now that he has empowered negotiations worldwide in order to correct unbalanced relationships.  This makes complete sense to do now while you are also cleaning house.  Forward agreements come after all that is well completed.  Just today we have close agreement already in the offing on NAFTA.  Recall that?  And yes it certainly needed to be tweaked.

It would all be funny if you are not on the receiving end of the smoke cloud.

Otherwise I want to say something important.  The MSM or main stream media is now attempting to get off their implied alliance with the so called Progressives.  Somehow finding that 70% of the American public does not trust them finally hit home.  This coincides with Trump's actual percentage of the 2016 popular vote soon to be announced. Their news programming is impacting their whole business and Roseanne's triumphant return to prime time hammered the point home.  My first clue came with that so called article couched as a conspiracy theory expose which laid out the evidence front to back.  No one thought that any of at was a conspiracy theory but we will pretend wouldn't we.

You get my point.  When you really have to tell your readers what they are hearing everywhere is the truth, you play it this way.  Gee, we heard this horrible rumor that France has fallen to the Nazis.  Sorry to bother you with this.

Thus we see a Syrian Gas Attack that makes zero sense and this crazy raid on Trump's lawyer that surely makes the whole legal process impossible.  How desperate must the Deep State be?

The MSM are not...

17:00

Cycle and Epicycle, Orb in Orb: the science of Paradise Lost Terra Forming Terra


I have always found reading through the thinking of a past writer to be fruitful even if it reflects back the truth of your own understanding.  Milton is well worth an effort and this can act as an introduction.  Otherwise you are stuck with taking an advanced course in English literature. It is on my to do list in some imagined future in paradise.

What really leaps out at me is that the Presbyter's  from their reading of the bible were profoundly motivated to pursue empirical and thus scientific inquiry in order to deeply understands GOD's creation.  This obviously spilled over into the creation of the Scottish enlightenment and our first modern universities in the next three generations and even reached myself centuries later.

 

Cycle and Epicycle, Orb in Orb: the science of Paradise Lost


https://aeon.co/ideas/cycle-and-epicycle-orb-in-orb-the-science-of-paradise-lost

is editor-at-large of The Marginalia Review of Books, a channel of The Los Angeles Review of Books. A regular contributor at several different sites, he holds a PhD in English from Lehigh University in Pennsylvania. His collection 'America and Other Fictions: On Radical Faith and Post-Religion' will be released by Zero Books in December.


...

17:00

The Case Against Lectures - Facts So Romantic Nautilus


Depending on the speaker, lectures can be a joy, but, the efficacy of the lecture, as a teaching method, is in doubt.Photograph by ESB Professional / Shutterstock

Getting lectured is rarely, if ever, a pleasant experience. Youre being told what to do and think, or even chastised. Dont lecture me, we like to say. Having to attend a lecture, thoughthats not so bad, depending on the speaker. Hell, on the go, I listen to lectures willingly. Check out A Master List of 1,300 Free Courses From Top Universities: 45,000 Hours of Audio/Video Lectures, from Open Culture. Its a treasure trove.

Yet the efficacy of the lecture, as a teaching method, is in doubt. The latest salvo comes from a study published in Science last month, authored by just under 30 researchers who, a decade ago, began monitoring almost 550 lecturers as they taught over 700 courses at 25 universities in Canada and the United States. The task of gathering and analyzing all the studys data is unenviable, involving sitting in on classes and then rewatching them on tape.

The main conclusions: First, Didactic practicesvarious forms of lecture, using slides and so forthare prevalent throughout the undergraduate STEM curriculum,
Read More

16:08

X.Org Server 1.20 RC4 Released, EGLStreams For XWayland Might Still Land Phoronix

On Tuesday a new X.Org Server 1.20 release candidate was issued by Red Hat's Adam Jackson for this prolonged development cycle now stretching well more than one and a half years...

16:06

85,000-Year-Old Finger Bone Complicates Understanding of African Migration SoylentNews

For years, archaeologist Huw Groucutt and his team had driven one particular stretch of desert on their way to dig sites in Saudi Arabia. As they drove they caught glimpses of what looked like bones, emerging from the slowly eroding sand. Finally, in 2014, the team decided to explore the array of bones at Al Wusta. Within two years, amidst more than 800 fossilized animal bones and nearly 400 stone artifacts, they discovered something remarkable: the middle digit of a finger bone, from what appeared to be a modern human.

Anatomically modern, that is. The fossilized finger dated to at least 85,000 years ago.

[...] The discovery is a dream come true, because it supports arguments that our teams have been making for more than 10 years, said archaeologist Michael Petraglia, another co-author of the study, in a press conference. This find together with other finds in the last few years suggests that modern humans, Homo sapiens, are moving out of Africa multiple times during many windows of opportunity in the last 100,000 years or so.

Read more of this story at SoylentNews.

16:03

The ESA Just Discovered a Second Magnetic Field Surrounding Our Planet Lifeboat News: The Blog

A trio of satellites studying our planets magnetic field have shown details of the steady swell of a magnetic field produced by the oceans tides.

Four years of data collected by the European Space Agencys (ESA) Swarm mission have contributed to the mapping of this other magnetic field, one that could help us build better models around global warming.

Physicist Nils Olsen from the Technical University of Denmark presented the surprising results at this years European Geosciences Union meeting in Vienna, explaining how his team of researchers managed to detail such a faint signature.

16:03

Brain implants put paralyzed man back in touch with himself Lifeboat News: The Blog

Researchers at Caltech have induced a range of sensations in the arm of a paralyzed man. The breakthrough comes courtesy of electrodes implanted in the brain, which stimulated the neurons to produce different feelings depending on the type of electrical signals. The team says the research could eventually lead to advanced prosthetic limbs that allow users to feel realistic sensations through them.

Plenty of exciting research is being conducted to help paralyzed people regain control of and feeling in their limbs. The NeuroLife system has helped a quadriplegic man move his arms again using just his thoughts, allowing him to perform a number of actions. Electrical nerve stimulation, both with and without electrode implants, has helped several people voluntarily move their legs again, often for the first time in years.

In this new study, Caltech researchers implanted two tiny arrays of electrodes into the somatosensory cortex, the small region of the brain responsible for the bodys sensations of movement or position, as well as cutaneous sensations such as touch, pressure and vibration.

16:02

Could space tourism become affordable within a decade? Lifeboat News: The Blog

How close are we really to space travel? Our featured contributor Lola Akinmade kerstrm talks to Space Nation, a company thats researching both space tourism and how space technology can help us on Earth.

Thanks to Google, it can often feel like there are no mysterious places left on earth to exploreand finding new places to call the final frontier seems increasingly difficult. Even the Pacific Oceans Marianna Trench, at over 36,000 feet deep and arguably the most legit final frontier on earth, has been explored by Hollywood director James Cameron in a submersible. As a result, the past few decades have seen us looking upwards to the most mysterious of places: Our own galaxy.

Blockbuster movies set in space and fictional alien encounters continue to intrigue us. Space discovery programs on TV science channels continually pique our curiosity. Even kids cartoons such as the 1960s American series The Jetsons brought the concept of commercial space travel closer to us, thanks to its flying space cars, pod-like apartments, and a robot maid called Rosie.

16:02

Legal experts: Conflict in outer space will happen Lifeboat News: The Blog

The University of Nebraska College of Law is joining forces with space and military law experts from Australia and the United Kingdom to take the lead on understanding how our Earth-bound laws will be applied in times of armed conflict in outer space.

Some of the best legal and policy minds at the University of Adelaide, UNSW Canberra, University of Exeter and Nebraska Law will draft the definitive document on military and security law as applied to space.

The Woomera Manual on the International Law of Military Space Operations is to be completed in 2020. It will draw on the knowledge of dozens of legal and space operations experts from around the world.

15:59

Adobe April Security Bulletin Tuesday fixed 4 critical flaws in Flash Security Affairs

Adobe April Security Bulletin Tuesday is out, the company has addressed four critical vulnerabilities in the Flash Player.

Adobe April Security Bulletin has addressed a total of 19 vulnerabilities in its products, including Flash Player, Experience Manager, InDesign CC, Digital Editions, ColdFusion and the PhoneGap Push plugin.

The flaws addressed with the Adobe April Security Bulletin Tuesday include a use-after-free, out-of-bounds read, out-of-bounds write and heap overflow bugs that could be exploited by remote attackers to execute arbitrary code on the target system and that could lead information disclosure.

Adobe has released security updates for Adobe Flash Player for Windows, Macintosh, Linux and Chrome OS. These updates address critical vulnerabilities in Adobe Flash Player 29.0.0.113 and earlier versions. Successful exploitation could lead to arbitrary code execution in the context of the current user. reads the security advisory published by Adobe.

Below the vulnerability details

Vulnerability Category Vulnerability Impact Severity CVE Number
Use-After-Free Remote Code Execution Critical CVE-2018-4932
Out-of-bounds read Information Disclosure Important CVE-2018-4933
Out-of-bounds read Information Disclosure Important CVE-2018-4934
Out-of-bounds write Remote Code Execution Critical CVE-2018-4935
Heap Overflow Information Disclosure Important CVE-2018-4936
Out-of-bounds write Remote Code Execution Critical CVE-2018-4937

Adobe acknowledged Google white hat hackers Mateusz Jurczyk and Natalie Silvanovich of Google Project Zero for reporting the CVE-2018-4936, CVE-2018-4935, CVE-2018-4934, CVE-2018-4937 flaw.

...

15:44

How to Find Out Everything Facebook Knows About You The Hacker News

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will testify before Congress this week to explain how his company collects and handles users' personal information. The past few weeks have been difficult for Facebook over concerns that the data of millions of users has been breached. Facebook stores details of almost every action you have taken and interaction you have engaged in on its platform. <!-- adsense -

15:00

1920s Claratone Radio Runs Windows 10 Hackaday

The core of the radio is a LattePanda, an extremely powerful Intel single board computer. Its running Windows, and loads up a list of Internet radio streams and podcasts to play from a USB thumb drive thats built into an old vacuum tube. The LattePanda uses its built-in Arduino to interface with the radios original front panel knobs, which now are used to switch between streams. A particularly neat effect is the static and cross-talk thats artificially added when switching stations, making it sound like youre really dialing in a station...

14:20

U.S. Legislators Trying to Weaken Encryption Yet Again SoylentNews

Senators Diane Feinstein (D-CA) and Chuck Grassley (R-IA) are preparing legislation that would regulate encryption and potentially mandate "backdoors." The Senate Judiciary Committee has been meeting with tech lobbyists and at least three researchers to come up with a "secure way" to allow only law enforcement to access encrypted information:

US lawmakers are yet again trying to force backdoors into tech products, allowing Uncle Sam, and anyone else with the necessary skills, to rifle through people's private encrypted information. Two years after her effort to introduce new legislation died, Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) is again spearheading an effort to make it possible for law enforcement to access any information sent or stored electronically. Such a backdoor could be exploited by skilled miscreants to also read people's files and communications, crypto-experts continue to warn.

Tech lobbyists this month met the Senate Judiciary Committee to discuss the proposed legislation a sign that politicians have changed tactics since trying, and failing, to force through new laws back in 2016. New York District Attorney and backdoor advocate Cyrus Vance (D-NY) also briefed the same committee late last month about why he felt new legislation was necessary. Vance has been arguing for fresh anti-encryption laws for several years, even producing a 42-page report back in November 2015 that walked through how the inability to trawl through people's personal communications was making his job harder.

Tech lobbyists and Congressional staffers have been leaking details of the meetings to, among others, Politico and the New York Times.

From the NYT article:

A National Academy of Sciences committee completed an 18-month study of the encryption debate, publishing a report last month. While it largely described challenges to solving the problem, one section cited presentations by several technologists who are developing potential approaches. They included Ray Ozzie, a former chief software architect at Microsoft;...

14:02

GRUB Boot-Loader Picks Up Support For F2FS File-System Phoronix

The GRUB2 boot-loader now has support for the Flash-Friendly File-System so it can boot to systems formatted with F2FS as the root file-system...

14:00

Post-quantum confidentiality for TLS ImperialViolet

In 2016, my colleague, Matt Braithwaite, ran an experiment in Google Chrome which integrated a post-quantum key-agreement primitive (NewHope) with a standard, elliptic-curve one (X25519). Since that time, the submissions for the 1st round of NISTs post-quantum process have arrived. We thus wanted to consider which of the submissions, representing the new state of the art, would be most suitable for future work on post-quantum confidentiality in TLS.

In TLS 1.2, the client offers possible cipher suites in its initial flow, the server selects one and sends a public-key in its reply, then the client completes the key-agreement in its second flow. With TLS 1.3, the client offers several possible public-keys in its initial flow and the server completes one of them in its reply. Thus, in a TLS 1.3 world, the larger post-quantum keys will be sent to every TLS server, whether or not theyll use it.

(There is a mechanism in TLS 1.3 for a client to advertise support for a key-agreement but not provide a public-key for it. In this case, if the server wishes to use that key-agreement, it replies with a special message to indicate that the client should try again and include a public-key because itll be accepted. However, this obviously adds an extra round-trip and we dont want to penalise more secure optionsat least not if we want them adopted. Therefore Im assuming here that any post-quantum key agreement will be optimistically included in the initial message. For a diagram of how this might work with a post-quantum KEM, see figure one of the Kyber paper. Also I'm using the term public-key here in keeping with the KEM constructions of the post-quantum candidates. It's not quite the same as a Diffie-Hellman value, but it's close enough in this context.)

In order to evaluate the likely latency impact of a post-quantum key-exchange in TLS, Chrome was augmented with the ability to include a dummy, arbitrarily-sized extension in the TLS ClientHello. To be clear: this was not an implementation of any post-quantum primitive, it was just a fixed number of bytes of random noise that could be sized to simulate the bandwidth impact of different optio...

13:43

Some People Are Their Own Identical Twins, And The Science Behind That Is Fascinating Lifeboat News: The Blog

Take any two cells from your body and theres a good chance their genetic sequences will be a match. That is, unless you happen to have whats referred to in the medical literature as a tetragametic chimerism a condition that causes separate fertilised embryos to merge into a single body.

Once thought to be rare among humans, theres good reason to suspect we might be seeing a lot more of it in the future.

The truth is, nobody is really certain how many humans have cells in their body that once belonged to a sibling.

13:34

If You Thought Quantum Mechanics Was Weird, Wait Till You Hear About Entangled Time Lifeboat News: The Blog

In the summer of 1935, the physicists Albert Einstein and Erwin Schrdinger engaged in a rich, multifaceted and sometimes fretful correspondence about the implications of the new theory of quantum mechanics. The focus of their worry was what Schrdinger later dubbed entanglement: the inability to describe two quantum systems or particles independently, after they have interacted.

Until his death, Einstein remained convinced that entanglement showed how quantum mechanics was incomplete. Schrdinger thought that entanglement was the defining feature of the new physics, but this didnt mean that he accepted it lightly. I know of course how the hocus pocus works mathematically, he wrote to Einstein on July 13, 1935. But I do not like such a theory. Schrdingers famous cat, suspended between life and death, first appeared in these letters, a byproduct of the struggle to articulate what bothered the pair.

The problem is that entanglement violates how the world ought to work. Information cant travel faster than the speed of light, for one. But in a 1935 paper, Einstein and his co-authors showed how entanglement leads to whats now called quantum nonlocality, the eerie link that appears to exist between entangled particles. If two quantum systems meet and then separate, even across a distance of thousands of lightyears, it becomes impossible to measure the features of one system (such as its position, momentum and polarity) without instantly steering the other into a corresponding state.

13:33

Your Body Is a Teeming Battleground Lifeboat News: The Blog

Its time to rethink the quest to control aging, death, and diseaseand the fear of mortality that fuels it.

I went to medical school, at least in part, to get to know death and perhaps to make my peace with it. So did many of my doctor friends, as I would find out. One dayusually when youre young, though sometimes laterthe thought hits you: You really are going to die. That moment is shocking, frightening, terrible. You try to pretend it hasnt happened (its only a thought, after all), and you go about your business, worrying about this or that, until the day you put your hand to your neckin the shower, sayand What is that? Those hard lumps that you know, at first touch, should not be there? But there they are, and they mean death. Your death, and you cant pretend anymore.

I never wanted to be surprised that way, and I thought that if I became a doctor and saw a lot of death, I might get used to it; it wouldnt surprise me, and I could learn to live with it. My strategy worked pretty well. Over the decades, from all my patients, I learned that I would be well until I got sick and that although I could do some things to delay the inevitable a bit, whatever control I had was limited. I learned that I had to live as if I would die tomorrow and at the same time as if I would live forever. Meanwhile, I watched as what had been called medical carethat is, treating the sickturned into health care, keeping people healthy, at an ever-rising cost.

13:33

Why a New Idea to Search for Extra Dimensions in the Pulse of Spacetime Is Turning Heads Lifeboat News: The Blog

If physicists do find that gravitational waves have travelled through dimensions other than the four we live in, it will be the start of a revolution in physics. But how close are we really?

Why a New Idea to Search for Extra Dimensions in the Pulse of Spacetime Is Turning Heads

13:33

A Gene That Increases Your Risk Of Alzheimers Has Been Neutralised For The First Time Lifeboat News: The Blog

Alzheimers gene is neutralised in human brain cells for the first time.

Just two copies of this gene can increase your risk 12-fold.

13:33

Scientists at CERN discover colour of antimatter Lifeboat News: The Blog

Measuring the structure of antimatter could help us unlock the secrets of the universe.

Science.

13:32

Your Mind Is Not Limited to Your Brain, Scientists Say Lifeboat News: The Blog

Have you ever questioned someones state of mind or reminded someone that it pays to be mindful? Maybe youve told someone that they needed to be more open-minded? Or perhaps youve felt like you need to find some peace of mind for yourself.

But have you ever wondered what exactly a mind is?

If you try, its quite difficult to define the concept. It is the center and stronghold of your being, the basis of your consciousness and without it can you even be considered to be truly alive? I have wondered many times about what and where it is.

13:32

Humans are going to infinity and beyond (or at least the moon) with Boeings Starliner Lifeboat News: The Blog

NASA wants to go to Mars. SpaceX wants to go to Mars. Michio Kaku wants humanity to go to Mars so we can avoid extinction. The rest of us just want to see our species actually set foot on Mars. But first, the moon.

Think of the moon as a launchpad for the Red Planet. As LiveScience found out, Boeings Crew Space Transportation (CST)-100 Starliner is going to take advantage of our satellite as a blast-off point for the next frontier. Starliner (the name is about as sci-fi as you can get) is what happens when Boeing, which probably makes everyone think airplanes not spaceships, joins forces with NASA to develop a reusable space capsule that will be able to fly up to seven astronauts to the ISS. It will also be the worlds first commercial space vehicle.

Starliner is even autonomous. Meaning crews will spend less time on training and take off sooner. It only needs one astronaut to fly it, or more like assist it in flight, using tablets and touch screens.

13:32

Human bias is a huge problem for AI. Heres how were going to fix it Lifeboat News: The Blog

Machines dont actually have bias. AI doesnt want something to be true or false for reasons that cant be explained through logic. Unfortunately human bias exists in machine learning from the creation of an algorithm to the interpretation of data and until now hardly anyone has tried to solve this huge problem.

A team of scientists from Czech Republic and Germany recently conducted research to determine the effect human cognitive bias has on interpreting the output used to create machine learning rules.

The teams white paper explains how 20 different cognitive biases could potentially alter the development of machine learning rules and proposes methods for debiasing them.

13:31

Solar storm could strike Earth this week: What you need to know Lifeboat News: The Blog

A solar storm is forecast to hit Earth Tuesday after the sun unleashed a powerful solar flare a burst of high-energy radiation.

13:31

NanoRacks lays out vision for turning rockets into space outposts, starting with Independence-1 Lifeboat News: The Blog

Texas-based NanoRacks is fine-tuning and rebranding its concept for turning upper-stage rocket boosters into orbital outposts, starting with a habitat called Independence-1.

13:31

88,000-Year-Old Middle Finger Discovery Changes Human History Lifeboat News: The Blog

The discovery of an 88,000-year-old human finger fossil in the Nefud Desert in northern Saudi Arabia is changing the way researchers think about the migration of early humans.

12:51

Rural Wireless Association Opposes U.S. Government Ban on Huawei and ZTE Equipment SoylentNews

Banning Chinese network gear is a really bad idea, small ISPs tell FCC

The Federal Communications Commission's proposed ban on Huawei and ZTE gear in government-funded projects will hurt small Internet providers' efforts to deploy broadband, according to a lobby group for rural ISPs.

As previously reported, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai's proposal would prevent Universal Service Fund (USF) money from being used to buy equipment or services from companies that "pos[e] a national security risk." If the FCC approves the proposal, the ban is most likely to prevent the purchase of equipment from Chinese technology vendors Huawei and ZTE. But it could also affect other companies and technology from other countries, depending on how the FCC determines which companies pose national security threats.

ISPs who use federal money to build or expand broadband service would end up with fewer options for buying network gear. This would "irreparably damage broadband networks (and limit future deployment) in many rural and remote areas throughout the country," the Rural Wireless Association (RWA) told the FCC in a filing yesterday.

The RWA represents rural wireless Internet providers that offer home or mobile Internet service and have fewer than 100,000 subscribers. A recent Wall Street Journal report said that small ISPs rely on Huawei gear more than large telcos do.

Previously: U.S. Lawmakers Urge AT&T to Cut Ties With Huawei
U.S. Government Reportedly Wants to Build a 5G Network to Thwart Chinese Spying
U.S. Intelligence Agency Heads Warn Against Using Huawei and ZTE Products
The U.S. Intelligence Community's Demonization of Huawei Remains Highly Hypocritical


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12:00

Simple Quantum Computing in 150 Lines of Python Hackaday

What does it take to build a quantum computer? Lots of exotic supercooled hardware. However, creating a simulator isnt nearly as hard and can give you a lot of insight into how this kind of computing works. A simulator doesnt even have to be complicated. Heres one that exists in about 150 lines of Python code.

You might wonder what the value is. After all, there are plenty of well-done simulators including Quirk that we have looked at in the past. Whats charming about this simulator is that with only 150 lines of code, you can reasonably read the whole thing in a sitting and gain an understanding of how the different operations really affect the state.

One thing to note is that the 150 lines quoted includes comments, so the actual code bulk is even less. The majority of the program handles the quantum register and a generic way to apply a matrix to the quantum state. That leaves most of the operations as just simple definitions of matrices. For example:

 # Hadamard Gate
 'H': np.multiply(1. / np.sqrt(2), np.matrix([
 [1, 1],
 [1, -1]
 ])),

Using the simulator involves writing more Python code, so really this is a library more than a simulator like Quirk. For example, heres part of the example code included:

#############################################
# Swap 2 Qubits #
#############################################
# Here, We Will Apply a Pauli-X Gate / NOT Gate
# To the first qubit, and then after the algorithm,
# it will be swapped to the second qubit.

Swap = QuantumRegister(2) # New Quantum Register of 2 qubits
Swap.applyGate('X', 1) # Apply The NOT Gate. If Measured Now, it should be 10

# Start the swap algorithm
Swap.applyGate('CNOT', 1, 2)
Swap.applyGate('H', 1)
Swap.applyGate('H', 2)
Swap.applyGate('CNOT', 1, 2)
Swap.applyGate('H', 1)
Swap.applyGate('H', 2)
Swap.applyGate('CNOT', 1, 2)
# End the swap algorithm

print('SWAP: |' + Swap.measure() + '&gt;') # Measure the State, Should be 01

If you want to learn more about quantum computing, we did a series recently that started simply, looked at communications, and wrapped up with a look at Grovers algorithm.

11:14

Facebook Intensifies Censorship Ahead of Congressional Testimony by Zuckerberg SoylentNews

https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2018/04/09/cens-a09.html

Zuckerberg announced Friday that the company will "require people who manage large pages to be verified," meaning they will have to provide the company, and by extension the US government, with their real names and locations.

[...] Zuckerberg added that the move would involve the hiring of thousands of additional censors and "security" personnel. "In order to require verification for all of these pages and advertisers, we will hire thousands of more people," he wrote.


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11:13

NEW 'Off The Wall' ONLINE 2600 - 2600: The Hacker Quarterly

NEW 'Off The Wall' ONLINE

Posted 11 Apr, 2018 1:13:44 UTC

The new edition of Off The Wall from 10/04/2018 has been archived and is now available online.

11:00

10:57

Facebook Eavesdropping Patent and Congress Questions Social Network by Laurel Papworth

Why does Facebook have patents to listen (eavesdrop) through the microphone for ambient sound if they are only using it for uploading your video? My live feed of the Congress hearings cut out right near the end, but did anyone ask these questions?

  • Mr Zuckerberg Facebook submitted a patent 7 years ago to listen to background noise (ambient waveforms) for the purposes of delivering content. Is that technology now active?
  • Mr Zuckerberg, Facebook has a Shazam-like service for music identification that is used to compile Top Trends lists. So why did you say that the only audio Facebook has access to is uploaded videos from phones, and Messenger?
  • Mr Zuckerberg, Facebook has had a patent for 5 or 6 years to identify where person is via voice identification in ambient environment. How is that currently being used?
  • Blah blah. The senators got their day in court with Zuck but they didnt seem very well informed. Maybe they need, I dunno, an intern to do a few minutes research eg. Google jockeys. [Quel irony!]

Facebook Eavesdropping Patent #1

Periodic ambient waveform analysis for enhanced social functions is a patent to listen to ambient waveforms e.g. stuff around you

In 2014 ambient patent (filed 2011)

Client devices periodically capture ambient audio waveforms, generate waveform fingerprints, and upload the fingerprints to a server for analysis. The server compares the waveforms to a database of stored waveform fingerprints, and upon finding a match, pushes content or other information to the client device.  . Facebook Eavesdropping Patent 2014  8706499

(ambient means sound around you eg what you are watching on TV, if you are in the movies etc)

And if your friends are around you (the term voice waveform fingerprint seems to be voice mapping)

Thus a clients location may be enhanced if the location of users whose fingerprints match the clients is known. 8706499

yeah turn off location tracking, go to the pub with friends, and presto, your location is tracked.

Facebook Eavesdropping Patent #2

Periodic ambient waveform analysis for dynamic device configuration is a patent for modifying your phone

Particular embodiments of the special purpose client application hosted on a mobile device of a user may be configured to continuously or periodically capture ambient audio waveform data using a microphone or sensor subsystem in the mobile device. In particular embodiments, the mobile device may perform waveform analysis on the ambient audio, and adjust the device settings, such as the ringer volume or vibrate mode...

10:29

10:26

Tech investor says Rebekah Mercer asked Facebook for probe into Cambridge Analytica The Hill: Technology Policy

A tech investor reportedly met with senior Facebook officials last month on behalf of GOP mega-donor Rebekah Mercer and pitched the company on an independent investigation into Cambridge Analytica and the 2016 presidential election. The March...

10:26

Adobe, Microsoft Push Critical Security Fixes Krebs on Security

Adobe and Microsoft each released critical fixes for their products today, a.k.a Patch Tuesday, the second Tuesday of every month. Adobe updated its Flash Player program to resolve a half dozen critical security holes. Microsoft issued updates to correct at least 65 security vulnerabilities in Windows and associated software.

The Microsoft updates impact many core Windows components, including the built-in browsers Internet Explorer and Edge, as well as Office, the Microsoft Malware Protection Engine, Microsoft Visual Studio and Microsoft Azure.

The Malware Protection Engine flaw is one that was publicly disclosed earlier this month, and one for which Redmond issued an out-of-band (outside of Patch Tuesday) update one week ago.

That flaw, discovered and reported by Googles Project Zero program, is reportedly quite easy to exploit and impacts the malware scanning capabilities for a variety of Microsoft anti-malware products, including Windows Defender, Microsoft Endpoint Protection and Microsoft Security Essentials.

Microsoft says by default, Windows 10 receives updates automatically, and for customers running previous versions, we recommend they turn on automatic updates as a best practice. Microsoft doesnt make it easy for Windows 10 users to change this setting, but it is possible. For all other Windows OS users, if youd rather be alerted to new updates when theyre available so you can choose when to install them, theres a setting for that in Windows Update. In any case, dont put off installing these updates too long.

...

10:17

Zuckerberg holds his own in round one of testimony The Hill: Technology Policy

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg offered a vehement defense of his company on Tuesday during a lengthy Senate hearing, the first time the chief of the nations largest social media company has ever appeared before a congressional panel.The 33-year-old...

10:12

Smogon - 386,489 breached accounts Have I Been Pwned latest breaches

In April 2018, the Pokmon website known as Smogon announced they'd suffered a data breach. The breach dated back to September 2017 and affected their XenForo based forum. The exposed data included usernames, email addresses, genders and both bcrypt and MD5 password hashes.

10:06

Valve Offers Up New Privacy Settings For Steam Gamers Phoronix

In wake of recent privacy scandals in the tech world, Valve is now offering new privacy settings for Steam users...

10:00

Danko Nikolic joins our blog team with the post Robots Go Mental. Lifeboat News

Danko Nikolic joins our blog team with the post "Robots Go Mental". Danko Nikolic joins our blog team with the post "Robots Go Mental".

10:00

HPR2528: CCTV with DARKNET Hacker Public Radio

Twitter: @operat0r DERP SHELL CODE https://rmccurdy.com/scripts/DARKNET

09:46

Zuckerberg's notes suggest he expected lawmakers to ask whether he'd resign: report The Hill: Technology Policy

Notes brought to a Senate hearing by Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Tuesday reportedly suggested that he anticipated lawmakers to ask whether he planned to resign from the company amid questions about its handling of users' data.The notes, captured...

09:45

AMD Posts KFD Support For GFX9/Vega Phoronix

With the in-development Linux 4.17 kernel there is the long-awaited discrete GPU support in good shape at least for hardware like Polaris and Fiji. While the latest and greatest AMD GPUs are the Vega family, more work has been needed for AMDKFD support. Unfortunately those Vega changes didn't make it in for Linux 4.17, but those patches are now available...

09:42

Overnight Tech: Zuckerberg grilled by lawmakers over data scandal | What we learned from marathon hearing | Facebook hit with class action lawsuit | Twitter endorses political ad disclosure bill | Uber buys bike share The Hill: Technology Policy

ZUCKERBERG ON THE HILL: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified for the first time before Congress Tuesday facing lawmakers during a joint hearing of the Senate Commerce and Judiciary committees.Senators grilled him on the controversy...

09:37

Armor-Piercing Bullet Turned to Dust SoylentNews

Armor-Piercing Bullet Turned to Dust When Fired at Composite Metal Foam

Essentially a metal sponge consisting of hollow metal beads within solid metal, composite metal foam (CMF) generally retains some physical properties of its base materials. While its defining characteristic is ultra-high porosity, CMF boasts 5 to 6 times greater strength as well as over 7 times higher energy absorption than previously developed metal foams. Typically created by melting aluminum around hollow metal spheres, it is impressively 70% lighter than sheet metal and 80 times more energy absorbent than steel.

The foam is claimed to be non-toxic, resistant to radiation, fire and heat resistant.

http://www.breitbart.com/tech/2016/04/21/watch-armor-piercing-bullet-turned-to-dust-when-fired-at-composite-metal-foam/

Youtube video (13 seconds) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lWmFu-_54fI

Related video (2:30) demonstrates automotive and other applications https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7uE_f9rXLlk

Slightly different coverage at https://newatlas.com/metal-foam-bullets/42731/

Another Youtube video, demonstrating an explosion - https://youtu.be/yMVEQh5Akcc


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09:12

09:00

Bringing Guitar Synthesis To The Microcontroller Hackaday

If youre working with audio in an embedded environment, the best option for years now has been the Teensy 3 microcontroller board. This choice has mostly been due to its incredible power and audio libraries, but until now we really havent seen a stompbox-style interface that used the Teensy to its fullest extent. Now we have, in [Wolkstein]s GitSynth, everything you could want in a synthesizer that processes the signals from an electric guitar.

The core of this build is a Teensy 3, and all the audio goodies that come with that. Also included is a USB MIDI and audio interface, smartly both attached to a panel-mount USB-B connector on the back of the stompbox. Other controls include a single mono in jack for guitars and synths, two mono out jacks for stereo-ish output, a bunch of footswitches for bypass, tap tempo, preset selection, a jack for an expression pedal, and some buttons to move around the LCD user interface.

While putting a powerful microcontroller in a stomp box for is a project weve seen many times, this project really shines with the MIDI GUI thats built for a device with a real display and a mouse. [Wolkstein] built a PyQt-based app for this synth, and its a plethora of buttons and sliders that looks similar enough to a real synthesizer. Theres enough configurability here for anyone.

You can check out the demo video (in German, but auto-translate subtitles exist) below.

Thanks [Mynaru] for the tip!

08:37

08:16

Reddit identifies nearly 1,000 accounts linked to Russian troll farm The Hill: Technology Policy

Reddit announced Tuesday that it has found nearly 1,000 accounts suspected to be linked to a Russian troll farm.Reddit CEO Steve Huffman, writing under the username spez, wrote that the platform had identified 944 accounts suspected...

07:53

Google Opens Up VR180 to Developers SoylentNews

Google has published code and details for VR180, a video/photo format intended for simpler devices to capture or display content for virtual reality:

For Google's VR180 to become successful, manufacturers and developers have to be onboard, creating devices and churning out videos and apps that use the format. That's why the tech giant is now opening it up to hardware-makers and devs by publishing the remaining details on how they can start engaging with the format and offer VR180 products. When Google-owned platform YouTube introduced VR180 last year, it introduced the format as a way for creators to shoot immersive photos and videos for VR headsets that still have a normal perspective when viewed on a phone or PC.

From Google's blog:

Today, we're publishing the remaining details about creating VR180 videos on github and photos on the Google Developer website, so any developer or manufacturer can start engaging with VR180.

For VR180 video, we simply extended the Spherical Video Metadata V2 standard. Spherical V2 supports the mesh-based projection needed to allow consumer cameras to output raw fisheye footage. We then created the Camera Motion Metadata Track so that you're able to stabilize the video according to the camera motion after video capture. This results in a more comfortable VR experience for viewers. The photos that are generated by the cameras are written in the existing VR Photo Format pioneered by Cardboard Camera.

The Lenovo Mirage VR180 camera is set to launch on May 4 for $300. The Yi Horizon VR180 is set to launch sometime in the summer for $400.

Good news for the stereoscopic 3D imaging enthusiasts out there.

Previously: Google Bisects VR

Related: Virtual Reality Audiences Stare Straight Ahead 75% of the Time


...

07:41

Warning: Your Windows PC Can Get Hacked by Just Visiting a Site The Hacker News

Can you get hacked just by clicking on a malicious link or opening a website? YES. Microsoft has just released its April month's Patch Tuesday security updates, which addresses multiple critical vulnerabilities in its Windows operating systems and other products, five of which could allow an attacker to hack your computer by just tricking you visit a website. Microsoft has patched five

07:33

Robots Go Mental Lifeboat News: The Blog

We created the first working AI using the theory of practopoiesis. We are still far away from biological intelligence, but still we have something much better than classical machine learning. You can play with a live demo here:

07:31

Laptop Support Improvements Head Into Linux 4.17 Phoronix

Andy Shevchenko has submitted the platform-drivers-x86 updates for the Linux 4.17 kernel merge window that largely benefit modern x86 laptops running Linux...

07:16

How to know if your Facebook data was shared with Cambridge Analytica? HackRead

By Waqas

Did Cambridge Analytica had access to your Facebook data? This new

This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: How to know if your Facebook data was shared with Cambridge Analytica?

06:49

Cruz presses Zuckerberg on alleged censorship of conservative speech The Hill: Technology Policy

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) grilled Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Tuesday over what the Republican senator described as broad concerns that the company has censored conservative accounts and content.Zuckerberg defended Facebook as a platform for...

06:34

Red Hat Confirms RHEL 8 Will Drop Python 2 Phoronix

While it could have been pretty much assumed up until now that Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 would ship without Python 2 considering that next enterprise Linux OS release isn't even out yet, its long-term maintenance support, and Python 2 reaching EOL at the start of 2020, but now it's been made official...

06:16

World's Hottest Pepper Sends Man to the ER SoylentNews

Submitted via IRC for SoyCow9228

For one brave man, eating one of the hottest peppers in the world came with an unexpected side effect: Days of splitting headaches that prompted a trip to the emergency room.

The unusual case, detailed in The BMJ on Monday, began immediately after the 34-year-old man took part in a chili pepper eating contest. He ate a Carolina Reaper, the pepper christened as the world's hottest by the Guinness Book of World Records in 2013 (though there have been several unofficial challengers to the title since).

Immediately after eating the pepper, he started dry heaving. Then he felt excruciating neck pain that soon radiated throughout his entire head. For the next several days, he would experience short but incredibly painful bursts of head pain known as thunderclap headaches. The episodes got so bad that he eventually visited the ER.

Thankfully, a brain scan didn't reveal any major neurological issues, such as a bulged blood vessel (aneurysm) or bleeding. But several of his arteries did appear to narrow significantly, a condition called reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS).

RCVS is known to cause thunderclap headaches, and can be brought on by reactions to drugs, including cocaine and certain antidepressants. No case of RCVS has ever been associated with pepper-eating, but the main ingredient that accounts for a pepper's spicinesscapsaicinis known to interact with our blood vessels, either by constricting or dilating them, the doctors noted. And cayenne peppers have been rarely linked to heart attacks or suddenly constricted arteries near the heart.

Source: https://gizmodo.com/worlds-hottest-pepper-sends-man-to-the-er-with-thunderc-1825110311

The Carolina Reaper was the world's hottest pepper at the time of the incident, but two varieties have surpassed it unofficially: Dragon's Breath, developed by Neal Price, NPK Technology, and Nottingham Trent University for anesthetic research, and Pepper X, created by the breeder of the Carolina Reaper, Ed Currie.


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06:06

06:06

Zuckerberg says Mueller has interviewed Facebook employees The Hill: Technology Policy

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said Tuesday that special counsel Robert Mueller has interviewed Facebook employees as part of his investigation into Russian election interference.The social media executive also said he believes the company may...

06:00

Micro Chainsaw Gets a Much Needed Nitro Power Boost Hackaday

When life hands you the worlds smallest chainsaw, whats there to do except make it even more ridiculous? Thats what [JohnnyQ90] did when he heavily modified a mini-electric chainsaw with a powerful RC car engine.

The saw in question, a Bosch EasyCut with Nanoblade technology, can only be defined as a chainsaw in the loosest of senses. Its a cordless tool intended for light pruning and the like, and desperately in need of the [Tim the Toolman Taylor] treatment. The transmogrification began with a teardown of the drivetrain and addition of a custom centrifugal clutch for the 1.44-cc nitro RC car engine. The engine needed a custom base to mount it inside the case, and the original PCB made the perfect template. The original case lost a lot of weight to the bandsaw and Dremel, a cooling fan was 3D-printed, and a fascinatingly complex throttle linkage tied everything together. With a fuel tank hiding in the new 3D-printed handle, the whole thing looks like it was always supposed to have this engine. The third video below shows it in action; unfortunately, with the engine rotating the wrong direction and no room for an idler gear, [JohnnyQ90] had to settle for flipping the bar upside down to get it to cut. But with some hacks its the journey that interests us more than the destination.

This isnt [JohnnyQ90]s first nitro rodeo hes done nitro conversions on a cordless drill and a Dremel before. You should also check out his micro Tesla turbine, too, especially if you appreciate fine machining.

Thanks for the tip, [Altome].

05:52

SPRING ISSUE OF 2600 RELEASED 2600 - 2600: The Hacker Quarterly

Spring is in the air and the new issue of 2600 should be in your hands. If it's not, we can help alleviate this. The easiest way is to subscribe, which you can do on our subscription page for printed copies. If you have a Kindle and want to have issues magically appear there, simply click on the U.S. or U.K. Kindle subscription page and you'll have the new issue within seconds. It doesn't end there. You can also subscribe through Google Play or the Nook all over the planet. And for a full listing of all of our digital options, simply go to our digital edition guide, which is constantly being updated.

And remember: all of these issues can be taken outdoors so you can enjoy the spring weather.

05:47

Zuckerberg apologizes to Congress over spread of 'fake news,' hate speech The Hill: Technology Policy

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Tuesday kicked off his inaugural appearance before lawmakers on Capitol Hill by apologizing for his companys recent missteps.Its clear now that we didnt do enough to prevent these tools from being used for harm,"...

05:46

Facebook Offering $40,000 Bounty If You Find Evidence Of Data Leaks The Hacker News

Facebook pays millions of dollars every year to researchers and bug hunters to stamp out security holes in its products and infrastructure, but following Cambridge Analytica scandal, the company today launched a bounty program to reward users for reporting "data abuse" on its platform. The move comes as Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg prepares to testify before Congress this week amid scrutiny

05:41

Call for Papers: USENIX Workshop on Offensive Technologies (WOOT '18) Bugtraq

Posted by Yves Younan on Apr 10

Dear all,

We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the 12th USENIX
Workshop on Offensive Technologies! WOOT '18 will be held on August
1314, 2018, in conjunction with USENIX Security in Baltimore, MD, USA.

WOOT provides a forum for high-quality, peer-reviewed work discussing
tools and techniques for attack. Submissions should reflect the state of
the art in offensive computer security technology, exposing poorly
understood...

05:35

Emergency alert systems used across the US can be easily hijacked Help Net Security

A vulnerability affecting emergency alert systems supplied by ATI Systems, one of the leading suppliers of warning sirens in the USA, could be exploited remotely via radio frequencies to activate all the sirens and trigger false alarms. We first found the vulnerability in San Francisco, and confirmed it in two other US locations including Sedgwick County, Wichita, Kansas, Balint Seeber, Director of Threat Research at Bastille, told Help Net Security. Although we have not visited More

The post Emergency alert systems used across the US can be easily hijacked appeared first on Help Net Security.

05:30

The FCCs Big Problem with Small Satellites IEEE Spectrum Recent Content full text

Confusion and erratic enforcement at the US communications agency is sending satellite makers abroad Illustration: IEEE Spectrum

When officials at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) denied launch authorization for four innovative satellites from startup Swarm Technologies last December, the agency was unequivocal as to the reason. The applicant proposes to deploy and operate four spacecraft that are smaller than 10 centimeters in one of their three dimensions, read a letter to Swarms CEO and founder Sara Spangelo. These spacecraft are therefore below the size threshold at which detection by the Space Surveillance Network can be considered routine.

The FCC was worried about collisions in space, where even the smallest objects traveling at orbital velocities can inflict massive damage on satellites or, in a worst-case scenario, manned spacecraft. It thought Swarms SpaceBees satellites, measuring 10 by 10 by 2.5 cm, would be just too small to track.

When Swarm launched them anyway, on an Indian rocket in January, the FCC was furious. It rescinded permission for the companys next satellite launch, due later this month, and questioned whether Swarm was a suitable company to hold a communications license at all. If the FCC comes down hard on Swarm, the companys ambitious plans for a constellation of Internet of Things communications satellites could be doomed.

So why did Swarm take such a risk in launching its SpaceBees, or even building them in the first place? Perhaps because the FCCs position on small satellites has been bizarrely inconsistent.

An investigation by IEEE Spectrum has revealed that the FCC licensed multiple satellites smaller than 10 cm over the past five years, including some as small as 3.5 by 3.5 by 0.2 cm. But the commission has also changed its mind from one application to the next, refusing launch permission for satellites that were virtually identical to ones previously authorized. This uncertainty has led to at least one satellite maker exporting his technology rather than risk being denied a license in the U.S.

The Smaller, the Better

Most satellites are essentially smartphones in space. They have sensors such as cameras and magnetometers to gather data, radio transmitters and receivers for communication, processors to crunch the numbers, and batteries to power everything. And like smartphones, satellites have benefited from decades of technological advances such as those whose progress runs on Moores Laws timeclock.

...

05:29

Linux 4.17 To Support Microsemi Ocelot MIPS SoCs Phoronix

There are old CPU architectures being dropped from the Linux 4.17 kernel while also some new CPU support added. The latest work added with the busy Linux 4.17 development cycle is support for the MIPS-based Microsemi Ocelot SoCs...

05:00

Is it Time for Quantum Computing Startups? Maybe IEEE Spectrum Recent Content full text

IBM aims to boost quantum computing startups, but warns of a long revenue desert Illustration: iStockphoto

IBM is betting on quantum computing, but it cant win without the help of startups. And how long it will take for the bet to pay off is anybodys guess.

That was the message of the Q Summit, a one-day meeting of quantum computing researchers, investors, and entrepreneurs hosted by IBM in Menlo Park, Calif., last week.

We need startups in the quantum space, said Joe Raffa, director of IBM Ventures. Theres a huge amount of work to do, he said, to cross the long revenue desert.

The potential is big, but the risks are huge.

There are really only 15 or 20 people in the world who will make or break quantum computing, said Matt Johnson, CEO of QC Ware, a startup that is building a commercial software package for quantum computing.

Quantum computing was ten years away 20 years ago, said Vijay Pande, general partner at Andreessen Horowitz, and it still is. But eventually, he said, it will make a leap and take the computing world by surprise.

For generation after generation, the quantum computer will be way slower than the classic machine, he said. But its rate of evolution is hyper exponential, so suddenly, in some n years, it will jump over the classic machine. The real question is when will this transition happen.

Its hard to talk about the market if I dont even know what the algorithms are. Vijay Pande, Andreessen Horowitz

He had some predictions along that ten-year timeline. Within 10 years, for certain limited disciplines, he says, quantum computers will dominate. New algorithms will be developed to use themalgorithms that arent currently being developed for classic computers because it would be pointless to run them. Why? They would be just too slow.

But, he said, this all makes it very difficult to address quantum computing as a venture capitalist. Its hard to talk about the market if I dont even know what the algorithms are. 

Bill Coughran, a Sequoia Capital partner and former senior vice president of engineering at Google, said that, as an investor, Ive struggled with the question whether quantum computing is development or still r...

04:50

Successor to the LHC Could be a "Higgs Boson Factory" SoylentNews

Higgs factory a 'must for big physics'

A top physicist says the construction of a "factory" to produce Higgs boson particles is a priority for the science community. In an exclusive interview, Nigel Lockyer, head of America's premier particle physics lab, said studying the Higgs could hasten major discoveries. He said momentum in the physics community was gathering for a machine to be built either in Europe or Asia. "Our field uniformly agrees that would be a good thing," he told the BBC. The Fermilab director added: "The Higgs is such an interesting particle - a unique particle."

[...] Physicists had hoped that the LHC would turn up evidence of physics phenomena not explained by the Standard Model. So far, efforts to detect new physics have come away empty-handed, but studying the Higgs in more detail might break the impasse.

A successor to the Large Hadron Collider would be designed in a way that allows scientists to zero in on the Higgs boson. The LHC works by smashing beams of proton particles together, but the collisions that produce the Higgs also produce many other particles. This makes it complicated to work out which collisions produce the Higgs boson. A different type of particle smasher, called an electron-positron collider, should produce only a Higgs and another particle called a Z boson.

This makes it more suitable for detailed study of the Higgs' properties. Dr Lockyer said there were currently discussions over a new electron-positron collider in China, and a linear collider that could function as a Higgs factory in Japan. Alternatively, it could be housed at Cern after the Large Hadron Collider comes to the end of its operating lifetime. [...] But he stressed that there was still plenty to come from the LHC, which will undergo a major upgrade in the 2020s.


Original Submission

Read more of this story at SoylentNews.

04:30

Recharging Drones On The Go With A Supercharger Hackaday

If Techcrunch is to be believed, our skies will soon be filled with delivery robots, ferrying tacos and Chinese food and Amazon purchases from neighborhood-area dispatch stations to your front door. All of this is predicated on the ability of quadcopters to rapidly recharge their batteries, or at the very least swap out batteries automatically.

For their Hackaday Prize entry, [frasanz], [ferminduaso], and [david canas] are building the infrastructure that will make delivery drones possible. Its a drone supercharger, or a robot that grabs a drone, swaps out the battery, and sends it off to deliver whatever is in its cargo compartment.

This build is a droneport of sorts, designed to have a drone land on it, have a few stepper motors and movable arms spring into action, and replace the battery with a quick-change mechanism. This can be significantly more difficult than it sounds you need to grab the drone and replace the battery, something thats easy for human eyes and hands, but much harder for a few sensors and aluminum extrusion.

To change batteries, the team is just letting the drone land somewhere on a platform thats a few feet square. Arms then move it, pushing the drone to the center, and a second arm then moves in to swap the battery. The team is using an interesting locking cam solution to clamp the battery to the drone. Its much easier for a machine to connect than the standard XT-60 connector found on race quads.

Is this the project the world needs? Quite possibly so. Drones are going to be awesome once battery life improves. Until then, well have to live with limited flight times and drone superchargers.

The HackadayPrize2018 is Sponsored by:
...

04:28

Top VEVO Music videos Including Despacito defaced by hackers Security Affairs

Some of the most popular music VEVO videos on YouTube, including the worlds most popular video Despacito has been hacked by a duo calling themselves Prosox and KuroiSH.

Some of the most popular music videos on YouTube, including the worlds most popular YouTube video Despacito has been hacked.

Popular videos of  pop stars like Shakira, Drake, Selena Gomez, Adele, Taylor Swift, and Calvin Harris were replaced by hackers that spread the message Free Palestine.

Despacito, the Luis Fonsis mega-hit that was watched five billion times was replaced by an image of a group of armed men dressed in hooded sweatshirts that appeared to come from the Spanish series Money Heist.

The videos were hacked by a duo calling themselves Prosox and KuroiSH.

All the hacked videos are on singers accounts belonging to the VEVO platform that is owned by a group of some of the biggest music corporations.

According to YouTube, the problem doesnt affect its platform but Vevo.

After seeing unusual upload activity on a handful of Vevo channels, we worked quickly with our partner to disable access while they investigate the issue, a YouTube spokesperson said.

Vevo confirmed a security breach on systems.

We are working to reinstate all videos affected and our catalog to be restored to full working order. We are continuing to investigate the source of the breach, it said in a statement.

The alleged hacker @ProsoxW3b started posting severs Tweets first saying it has hacked for fun and not for profit.

...

04:18

Finally A Discussion Is Back Concerning FreeSync / Adaptive-Sync / VRR DRM Support Phoronix

While AMD has plumbed in FreeSync variable-rate refresh support with their AMDGPU DC display code stack, it's not yet all happy on the open-source mainline kernel as the missing piece has been over having a unified API for the Direct Rendering Manager drivers that can be used for supporting Free-Sync or the VESA-approved AdaptiveSync or HDMI VRR (Variable Refresh Rate). The discussion over having this common API for DRM drivers is back to being discussed...

04:15

Don't Forget, It's National Robotics Week! IEEE Spectrum Recent Content full text

Hundreds of robotics events are taking place all over the country this week Image: IEEE Spectrum; Robot cards: National Robotics Week IEEE Spectrum teams up each year with iRobot and Georgia Tech's Institute for Robotics & Intelligent Machines (IRIM) to create a set of trading cards featuring 10 famous robots and their creators. Check out the 2018 deck!

In 2010, the U.S. House of Representatives passed resolution H.Res. 1055 to make the second week of April officially National Robotics Week. Now celebrating its eighth year, National Robotics Week is more national and more robotics-y than ever, with hundreds of events taking place all over the country.

We know that most of you live robotics every single day anyway (as you should), and so National Robotics Week might not seem like its worth celebrating, but what about your friends and family who have no idea how cool robots are, and who maybe have no idea what it is that you actually, you know, do? Fundamentally, NRW is all about celebrating how cool robotics is, and getting as many people involved as possiblethink about finding an event near you that looks like fun, and then dragging someone along who doesnt (yet) understand why robotics is the best thing ever. Theyll either thank you for it, or think youre crazy, but its a win either way, right?

You can find out whats going on at the National Robotics Week website, here. If you cant find something near you, that just means that you need to start planning to host your own NRW event next year. And dont forget, weve partnered with NRW to make a brand-new set of robot trading cards, which you can get here.

[ National Robotics Week

04:03

Scientists splice genes from roses and celery to create superflower Lifeboat News: The Blog

New rose will be less prone to wilting and will create longer lasting bouquets.

Bryan Nelson

04:03

Contact Lens Kinda Makes You Cyborgy Lifeboat News: The Blog

This ones kinda hard to swallow so take a deep breath, open your minds, and pretend its 2100. I CONTACT is essentially a mouse fitted to your eyeball. The lens is inserted like any other normal contact lens except its laced with sensors to track eye movement, relaying that position to a receiver connected to your computer. Theoretically that should give you full control over a mouse cursor. Id imagine holding a blink correlates to mouse clicks.

The idea was originally created for people with disabilities but anyone could use it. Those of us too lazy to use a mouse now have a free hand to do whatever it is people do when they sit at the computer for endless hours. I love the idea but there is a caveat. How is the lens powered? Perhaps in the future, electrical power can be harnessed from the human body, just not in a Matrix creepy-like way.

Designers: eun-gyeong gwon & eun-jae lee.

04:03

The Future of Work Lifeboat News: The Blog

Technology is giving rise to a new workforce one governed by creativity, flexibility and the ability to travel anywhere.

04:02

Next Transportation Concept Would Improve Traffic Fluidity And Commuting Time Lifeboat News: The Blog

next is an advanced smart transportation system based on swarms of modular self-driving vehicles, refined by italian designers and engineers. the modules can drive autonomously on regular roads, joining themselves and detach even when in motion. when joined, the doors between modules fold, creating a walkable open space among modules. founded by tommaso gecchelin, the concept would greatly outperform conventional transportation when used in conjunction with other modules. the collection of next modules would improve traffic fluidity, commute time, running costs and pollution prevention by optimizing each module occupancy rate.

next-future-transportation-concept-designboom-02
once linked, passengers would be able to walk between modules next-future-transportation-concept-designboom-03
the modules would be individualized next-future-transportation-concept-designboom-04
shipping and goods transportation could be adapted next-future-transportation-concept-designboom-05
companies would offer specific modules to the system piotr boruslawski I designboom.

04:02

Laser Crosswalk Saves Pedestrians From a Painful Death Lifeboat News: The Blog

Anything that keeps people from getting hit is important.


When the light turns red, a huge laser wall projecting apparitions of crossing pedestrians spans across the crosswalk. The concept is designed to keep crossing pedestrians safe from any overzealous drivers who otherwise might have ran the red light.

04:00

HiFormance 2GB OpenVZ for $10.00/yr or 2GB KVM VPS for $5/mo! Low End Box


Kyle over at HiFormance is back with more amazing deals for us, this time even better then the last. We have enjoyed the positive feedback from our readers in regards to HiFormance and we look forward to listing them more!

Heres a note from the company

Its been a great year so far for us at HiFormance and we appreciate the LowEndBox community for all your support and feedback! Since we launched last year and sustained exponential growth, we have expanded our service & support across the nation and continue to do so each day! We want to give our customers a unique experience with the highest level of performance and customer service. Signing up with HiFormance means becoming apart of a network of specialists and hosting enthusiasts that ultimately give you the best presence on the web. Welcome to HiFormance, how can we further enhance your hosting experience?

Their WHOIS is public, theyre a registered LLC in the state of Wyoming (2017-000777425), they accept PayPal and Credit Cards, and you can find their legal docs at the following links:
**Pre-pay 3-years to get double CPU, memory, SSD or IP address!**

(Just submit a ticket and include the resource you choose to be doubled.)

Heres the offer: 

OpenVZ 2018
  • 2GB RAM
  • 2 x vCores
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  • 2TB Bandwidth
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  • OpenVZ (SolusVM)
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  • Windows & Linux
  • $5/mo
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Network Info: 

Buffalo, NY 107.175.18.3 Looking Glass...

03:58

Twitter backs digital ad regulation The Hill: Technology Policy

Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) on Tuesday said Twitter supports her co-authored legislation aimed at increasing digital political ad transparency.The microblogging company joins Facebook, which announced support last week, in supporting the...

03:40

Students fell prey to phishing attacks conducted by their universities HackRead

By Waqas

Universities Educating Students on Cybersecurity by Simulating Fake Phishing Attacks.

This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: Students fell prey to phishing attacks conducted by their universities

03:30

SirenJack flaw in Emergency Alert Systems could be exploited to trigger false alarms Security Affairs

SirenJack is a vulnerability found in ATI Systems emergency alert systems that can be exploited via radio frequencies (RF) to activate sirens and trigger false alarms.

Security experts at Bastille have devised a new technique, dubbed SirenJack to remotely hack emergency warning systems.

Emergency warning systems are used worldwide to alert the public of emergency situations like natural disasters and strikes.

False alarms cause widespread concern and increasing distrust in these systems, particularly as seen in 2017 after the Dallas Siren incident that set off over 150 tornado warning sirens citywide for more than 90 minutes. reads the website published by experts.

SirenJack is a vulnerability found in ATI Systems emergency alert systems that can be exploited via radio frequencies (RF) to activate sirens and trigger false alarms. The radio protocol used to control the sirens is not secure (activation commands are sent in the clear no encryption is used). continues the Bastille.

Ill-intentioned could trigger false alarms to cause panic and chaos among the population.

Researchers say they have discovered a new attack method that allows hackers to remotely trigger sirens. The SirenJack method leverages a vulnerability that resides in emergency alert systems made by ATI Systems.

These systems are widely adopted, it is quite easy to find them in military facilities and industrial plants.

The issue is related to the implementation of unsecured radio protocol controls.

The researcher Balint Seeber started its analysis back in 2016, he focused its researcher on San Franciscos outdoor public warning systems.

The warning systems had been using RF communications, the experts discovered that was possible to issue commands without encryption, allowing a man-in-the-middle attacker to forge them.

It was a joke for attackers to identify the radio frequency used by the targeted siren and send issue a specially crafted message that triggers an alarm.

A single warning siren false alarm has the potential to cause widespread panic and endanger lives, explained Chris Risley, CEO of Bastille Networks. Bastille informed ATI and San Francisco of the vulnerability 90 days ago, to give them time to put a patch in place. Were now...

03:16

"This Is Huge" -- Opposition Forces Kinder Morgan to Halt Trans Mountain Pipeline in Canada SoylentNews

Common Dreams reports

Environmental and indigenous groups are cheering after Kinder Morgan announced Sunday [April 8] it was halting most work on its controversial Trans Mountain expansion pipeline project, citing continuing opposition. Map of proposed route

"This is a sign that organizing works, and it could well be the beginning of the end for this dangerous pipeline", declared Clayton Thomas-Muller, a Stop-it-at-the-Source campaigner with 350.org.

"This is huge", added British Columbia-based advocacy group Dogwood.

In the company's statement announcing the move, chairman and CEO Steve Kean said Kinder Morgan was suspending "all non-essential activities and related spending" as a result of the "current environment" that puts shareholders at risk.

"A company cannot resolve differences between governments", he added, referencing resistance from B.C. lawmakers that is at odds with support for the project coming from Ottawa and neighboring Alberta. "While we have succeeded in all legal challenges to date, a company cannot litigate its way to an in-service pipeline amidst jurisdictional differences between governments", Kean said.

Unless legal agreements are reached by May 31, Kean said that "it is difficult to conceive of any scenario in which we would proceed with the project". (There are still 18 pending court cases that could thwart the project, the Wilderness Committee notes.)

Read more of this story at SoylentNews.

03:01

Margaret Hamilton Takes Software Engineering To the Moon and Beyond Hackaday

If you were to create a short list of women who influenced software engineering, one of the first picks would be Margaret Hamilton. The Apollo 11 source code lists her title as PROGRAMMING LEADER. Today that title would probably be something along the line of Lead software engineer

Margaret Hamilton was born in rural Indiana in 1936. Her father was a philosopher and poet, who, along with grandfather, encouraged her love of math and sciences. She studied mathematics with a minor in philosophy, earning her BA from Earlham College in 1956. While at Earlham, her plan to continue on to grad school was delayed as she supported her husband working on his own degree from Harvard. Margaret took a job at MIT, working under Professor Edward Norton Lorenz on a computer program to predict the weather. Margaret cut her teeth on the desk-sized LGP-30 computer in Nortons office.

Hamilton soon moved on to the SAGE program, writing software which would monitor radar data for incoming Russian bombers. Her work on SAGE put Margaret in the perfect position to jump to the new Apollo navigation software team.

The Apollo guidance computer software team was designed at MIT, with manufacturing d...

02:54

[$] Prospects for free software in cars LWN.net

Car manufacturers, like most companies, navigate a narrow lane between the benefits of using free and open-source software and the perceived or real importance of hiding their trade secrets. Many are using free software in some of the myriad software components that make up a modern car, and even work in consortia to develop free software. At the recent LibrePlanet conference, free-software advocate Jeremiah Foster covered progress in the automotive sector and made an impassioned case for more free software in their embedded systems.

Subscribers can read on for a report on the talk by guest author Andy Oram.

02:51

Flaw in Emergency Alert Systems Could Allow Hackers to Trigger False Alarms The Hacker News

A serious vulnerability has been exposed in "emergency alert systems" that could be exploited remotely via radio frequencies to activate all the sirens, allowing hackers to trigger false alarms. The emergency alert sirens are used worldwide to alert citizens about natural disasters, man-made disasters, and emergency situations, such as dangerous weather conditions, severe storms, tornadoes

02:51

Tips for an Information Security Analyst/Pentester career - Ep. 59: Blue team action The S@vvy_Geek Tips Tech Blog

What is being a blue teamer all about?

I don't like theoretical blah blah, so in this post I'm trying to give you a realistic flavor of what a blue teamer's work is all about.

I'm going to use AlienVault USM Anywhere Online Demo to explain you what being a blue teamer feels, at least partly, like.


So, what does a blue teamer do?

We check server logs for interesting patterns and, when a single alarm is found to occur multiple times, it generates an event.

In other words, a failed log in per se doesn't represent a relevant threat but, if we have 300 such events in -say- 90 minutes, we might be up with something we want to look at much more thoroughly.

Before getting into alarms it's important to talk about events, directives and correlation.

A single alarm per se isn't very important, but, when you start having an important number of alike alarms, you can be up with a certain event. Directives are rules defining what to do when a certain event is detected..

A correlation engine analyzes a series of logs and, if they match with a certain rule within a specific time frame, it creates an alarm with a specific priority.

Let's go to Activity/Alarms from the dashboard in AlienVault to see what's going on.

You might notice all the alarms shown in this demo are fake and are related to virtualized systems (you see VMware, Hyper-V and AWS environments).

You'll never normally see such macroscopic situations in a real-life example, but there's nonetheless some more interesting alarms we might want to investigate.

Lots of alarms might be triggered by an automated vulnerability scans or by scheduled tasks.

One pretty realistic example we might want to look at is related to repeated login failures.

I'm not normally very worried about it, but there are certain cases where you want to have a closer look at them.

Let's now analyze a specific example from the demo.

I analyze the details by clicking the alarm.


...

02:46

NVIDIA 396.18 Linux Driver Reaches Beta With New Vulkan SPIR-V Compiler Phoronix

NVIDIA has rolled out an exciting beta Linux driver today, the first in their upcoming 396 driver series...

02:39

A Quick Look At Feral GameMode / P-State Powersave vs. Performance Phoronix

With today's release of the Feral GameMode library/daemon of course I am running some benchmarks... Here is some initial numbers while this has spurred some fresh benchmarks looking at the P-State vs. CPUFreq performance and their respective frequency scaling governor options...

02:33

MPA Reveals Scale of Worldwide Pirate Site Blocking TorrentFreak

Few people following the controversial topic of Internet piracy will be unaware of the site-blocking phenomenon. Its now one of the main weapons in the entertainment industries arsenal and its affecting dozens of countries.

While general figures can be culled from the hundreds of news reports covering the issue, the manner in which blocking is handled in several regions means that updates arent always provided. New sites are regularly added to blocklists without fanfare, meaning that the public is kept largely in the dark.

Now, however, a submission to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) by Motion Picture Association Canada provides a more detailed overview. It was presented in support of the proposed blocking regime in Canada, so while the key figures are no doubt accurate, some of the supporting rhetoric should be viewed in context.

Over the last decade, at least 42 countries have either adopted and implemented, or are legally obligated to adopt and implement, measures to ensure that ISPs take steps to disable access to copyright infringing websites, including throughout the European Union, the United Kingdom, Australia, and South Korea, the submission reads.

The 42 blocking-capable countries referenced by the Hollywood group include the members of the European Union plus the following: Argentina, Australia, Iceland, India, Israel, Liechtenstein, Malaysia, Mexico, Norway, Russia, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand.

While all countries have their own unique sets of legislation, countries within the EU are covered by the requirements of Article 8.3 of the INFOSEC Directive which provides that; Member States shall ensure that rightholders are in a position to apply for an injunction against intermediaries whose services are used by a third party to infringe a copyright or related right.

That doesnt mean that all countries are actively blocking, however. While Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, and Slovenia have the legal basis to block infringing sites, none have yet done so.

In a significant number of other EU countries, however, blocking activity is prolific.

To date, in at least 17 European countries, over 1,800 infringing sites and over 5,300 domains utilized by such sites have been blocked, including in the following four countries where the positive impact of site-blocking over time has been demonstrated, MPA Canada notes.

Major blocking nations in the...

02:02

More than half your body is not human Lifeboat News: The Blog

More than half of your body is not human, say scientists.

Human cells make up only 43% of the bodys total cell count. The rest are microscopic colonists.

Understanding this hidden half of ourselves our microbiome is rapidly transforming understanding of diseases from allergy to Parkinsons.

02:02

NASAs virtual tour of the moon in all-new 4K resolution will blow your mind Lifeboat News: The Blog

NASA has just released an all-new 4K-resolution video showing the surface of the moon in incredible detail. Created using data gathered over the last nine years, the five-minute presentation shows our nearest neighbor like youve never seen it before.

02:02

A Luxury Space Hotel Is Taking Reservations for Anyone Who Wants to Get the Hell Off This Planet Lifeboat News: The Blog

Wow, I would love to stay here!


The Aurora Station, the worlds first luxury space hotel, orbiting 200 miles above the earth, is looking for guests.

Courtesy

Theres a place you can go on vacation where the sun rises and sets 16 times a day, the stars are clearer than youve ever seen, and there are only a handful of people around for miles and mileshundreds of miles, in fact.

This is the COOLEST! Everything thats Orbiting the Earth Right Now Lifeboat News: The Blog

Okay, if youve got some spare time, check out this amazing website called Stuff in Space. Its a simulation of every satellite (alive or dead), space station, and large piece of space junk orbiting the Earth right now.

You can zoom in and out, rotate the Earth and its satellites around. Pick any one object and discover more information about it. Or just leave it running and watch all the objects buzz around in real time. Humans have been busy launching a lot of stuff, and its only going to increase.

The simulation was made by James Yoder, an incoming Electrical and Computer Engineering freshman at the University of Texas at Austin, and its based on data supplied by Space Track, which is a service of the Joint Space Operations Center. They have a bunch of handy data feeds and APIs that you can use track orbital objects, but Ive never seen anything as creative as this.

02:02

Future AI may hallucinate and get depressed just like the rest of us Lifeboat News: The Blog

Recent research into human hormones may shed some light on the future of artificial intelligence development. Our complicated emotional states may be nothing more than a byproduct of learning.

02:01

This imaging sensor is powered by sunlight Lifeboat News: The Blog

A simultaneous imaging and energy harvesting sensor is in the news. Samuel Moore at IEEE Spectrum informed readers that a team of four from University of Michigan published their paper describing what they achieved. They built a prototype sensor, and what it does-think of a future camera that just about watches you non-stopis described in the journal, IEEE Electron Device Letters.

The article is titled Simultaneous Imaging and Energy Harvesting in CMOS Image Sensor Pixels. The four authors are from University of Michigan: Sung-Yun Park, Kyuseok Lee, Hyunsoo Song and Euisik Yoon.

Their technology puts the equivalent of a solar cell under each pixel, said IEEE Spectrum.

02:01

International conference Interventions to extend healthspan and lifespan Lifeboat News: The Blog

Kazan, Russia, April 2325.


2325 April 2018 in Kazan (Russia) will be a biogerontological conference with the following main topics:

- Epigenetic mechanisms of aging

- Genomics, metabolomics, proteomics of longevity in humans and animals.

- Environment and aging

- Biomarkers of biological age

- Pharmacological interventions in aging.

- Mechanisms of regeneration.

02:01

ReactOS 0.4.8 Released With Fix For 17 Year Old Bug, Various Driver/Kernel Improvements Phoronix

ReactOS 0.4.8 is now available as the project's first update of 2018 that continues working on becoming an "open-source Windows" with binary drop-in compatibility support...

02:00

Harnessing Rashba spin-Seebeck effect phenomenon will enable commercial devices to turn waste heat into electricity Lifeboat News: The Blog

Mechanical engineers at the University of California, Riverside, have reported success in using inexpensive materials to produce thermoelectric devices that transform low-level waste heat into electricity.

Their advance could enable a wide variety of commercial applications. For example, integrating thermoelectric generating devices into computer chips could enable the they produce to provide a power source. Waste heat from automobile engines could run a cars electronics and provide cooling. Photovoltaic solar cells could be made more efficient by harnessing the heat from sunlight striking them to generate more electricity.

Also, using the same basic technology, economical thermoelectric refrigerators could be produced that would be more energy efficient and with fewer moving parts than refrigerators that use compressors and coolant. Current thermoelectric refrigerators are expensive and relatively inefficient. In essence, they operate in reverse of , with an electric current applied to generate a temperature gradient that could be used in cooling.

02:00

Elon Musk: We Must Leave Earth For One Critical Reason Lifeboat News: The Blog

In its early life, the Earth would have been peppered nearly continuously by asteroids smashing into our young planet. These fiery collisions made our world what it is today. It may seem like things have changed since then, given the vast assortment of life and wide blue oceansand things have indeed changed. At least in some respects. However, Earth still receives thousands of tons of matter from space, but this is in the form of microscopic dust particles (as opposed to recurrent, energetic collisions).

Fortunately, in modern times, a large asteroid colliding with the surface of the Earth happens only very rarely. Nevertheless, it does happen from time to time.

As most are probably already aware, it is widely believed that an asteroid initiated the dinosaurs extinction some 65 million years ago. And more recently, the Russian Chelyabinsk meteor hit our planet in February of 2013. It entered at a shallow angle at 60 times the speed of sound. Upon contact with our atmosphere, it exploded in an air burst. The size of this body of rock (before it burned up and shattered) is estimated to be around 20 meters (across) and it weighed some 13,000 metric tons.

02:00

Major uptick in mobile phishing URL click rate Help Net Security

In a study of Lookout users, more than half clicked mobile phishing URLs that bypassed existing security controls. Since 2011, Lookout has observed this mobile phishing URL click rate increase 85 percent year-over-year. Mobile devices have eroded the corporate perimeter, limiting the effectiveness of traditional network security solutions like firewalls and secure web gateways, said Aaron Cockerill, chief strategy officer at Lookout. Operating outside the perimeter and freely accessing not just enterprise apps and SaaS, More

The post Major uptick in mobile phishing URL click rate appeared first on Help Net Security.

01:59

Killer robots: pressure builds for ban as governments meet Lifeboat News: The Blog

Countries spending billions on third revolution in warfare as UN debates regulation of AI-powered weapons.

01:59

To Speed Up AI, Mix Memory and Processing Lifeboat News: The Blog

New computing architectures aim to extend artificial intelligence from the cloud to smartphones.

01:59

New cancer stem cell marker also kills off cancer cells Lifeboat News: The Blog

Fluorescent dye not only highlights but also kills cancer stem cells.


Korean and Singaporean scientists have recently proposed a new probe to detect cancer stem cells, and it might be an effective seek-and-destroy weapon against a variety of cancer types.

In a paper published in the journal Angewandte Chemie earlier this month, the researchers describe a fluorescent dye that they created to highlight cancer stem cells, and, as it turns out, the dye does more than thatit may actually be lethal to the cells it binds to [1].

Cancer stem cells in brief

Cancer stem cells (CSCs, also known as TICs, tumor-initiating cells) are exactly what they sound like; they are cancerous cells that exhibit stem cell-like abilities to self-renew and differentiate into the other cell types found in a given tumor. Discovered at the end of the 90s, these cells are the real culprit behind cancerous growth, being able to give rise to both to other CSCs and cells that, while non-tumorigenic themselves, are still part of a tumorthey descend from a cancer stem cell but do not have the same ability to divide uncontrollably. This is according to the CSC model of cancer; according to the stochastic model, it might be possible that every cell in a tumor has the ability to self-renew and differentiate, not only cancer stem cells, and the truth might be not so clear-cut, with some tumors following one model and others following the other [2].

01:54

Links 10/4/2018: Slackware 13.x EOL, DragonFly BSD 5.2, Qt 5.11 Beta 3 Techrights

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

  • Desktop

    • Linux computer maker to move manufacturing to the U.S.

      Linux computer manufacturer System76 made its mark in part because of its commitment to open source principles and doing what it believes is right. Last year it released its homegrown Linux, Pop!_OS. In early March, System76 founder Carl Richell tweeted about the companys plans to locate its computer manufacturing factory in Denver, Colorado. By moving its manufacturing from China to the United States, System76 is offering more proof that its not afraid to buck prevailing tech norms to do things the System76 way.

    • Death of a Thinkpad x120e laptop

      My laptop named angela is (was?) a Thinkpad x120e (ThinkWiki). Its a netbook model (although they branded it a Ultraportable), which meant back then that it was a small, wide, slim laptop with less power, but cheaper. It did its job: I carried it through meetings and conferences all over the world for 7 years now. I also used it as a workstation for a short time in 2016-2017 when marcos stopped being a workstation and turned solely into a home cinema.

    • HP Unveils the Chromebook x2 as Worlds First Detachable Chromebook

      HP unveiled on Monday the HP Chromebook x2 as worlds first detachable Chromebook device, a 2-in-1 computer powered by Googles Linux-based Chrome OS operating system.

      With the HP Chromebook x2, the company known for manufacturing business laptops and other computer-related devices attempts to expand its Chromebook portfolio to meet the growing demand for these versatile, powerful, and secure computers driven by Googles Chrome OS and supporting Android apps.

      The HP Chromebook x2 hits a trifecta for customers, combining the productivity of the Chrome OS and pow...

01:46

Facebook Donated to 46 of 55 Members on Committee That Will Question Zuckerberg cryptogon.com

Via: USA Today: Members of the House and Senate committees that will question Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg about user privacy protection next week are also some of the biggest recipients of campaign contributions from Facebook employees directly and the political action committee funded by employees. The congressional panel that got the most Facebook contributions is []

01:43

DAOStack: Building A Framework For Decentralized Organizational Structures TechWorm

The term DAO, or decentralized autonomous organization, is relatively new. When mentioned in the company of blockchain enthusiasts, however, it tends to invoke excited speculation about whether DAOs will render the traditional hierarchal organizational model obsolete through the means of smart contracts. Such a revolution would negate the need for managerial decision-making, thereby consigning the concept of the C-Suite to a similar fate as the horse and cart.

While the development of blockchain technology has certainly brought such possibilities closer to fruition, attempts to develop DAOs to the point of overtaking traditional organizational structures have been problematic thus far. However, one company DAOstack is developing innovative solutions to these problems, implementing what it says will be the Wordpress for DAOs.

Before elaborating on the problems of DAOs and the solutions presented by DAOstack, it is worth considering a more prosaic question. What is the problem with traditional corporate structures, that the implementation of a DAO could solve?

Any company operating in todays competitive market seeks growth in order to deliver greater value to its stakeholders. While growth can ensure a competitive edge, it also comes with the challenge of balancing the interests of an ever-increasing stakeholder population.

The advent of the Internet enabled huge developments in connectivity, which in turn enabled the exchange of information and data in real-time. Rapid corporate globalization thus became a reality. Even with these technological developments, however, large organizations with huge stakeholder groups have continued to struggle with the balance of agile decision-making against the need for speedy growth.

Blockchains, Smart Contracts, and DAOs

With the advent of blockchain technology, distributed public ledgers are now being accepted as a global means of establishing trust and consensus. The Ethereum blockchain expanded the distributed ledger functionality that was introduced by Bitcoin to include a code execution machinery.

This machinery enables the development of decentralized applications known as apps alongside the algorithmic enforcement of agreements known as smart contracts. In its essence, a DAO constitutes a self-governing set of smart contrac...

01:39

Timelapse Imagines NYC Without Light Pollution SoylentNews

Photographers Gavin Heffernan and Harun Mehmedinovic of SKYGLOW have made and released a composited video to illustrate what New York City would look like if there were no light pollution blocking out the night sky.

The 3-minute video is in honor of the upcoming Dark Sky Week. Dark Sky Week is coming up from April 15th through the 21st this year. SKYGLOW is an ongoing project that raises awareness for endangered night skies and shows the dangers of light pollution.


Original Submission

Read more of this story at SoylentNews.

01:30

Simple Mechanism Gives Support for SMT Assembly Hackaday

With the fine work needed for surface-mount technology, most of the job entails overcoming the limits of the human body. Eyes more than a couple of decades old need help to see whats going on, and fingers that are fine for manipulating relatively large objects need mechanical assistance to grasp tiny SMT components. But where it can really fall apart is when you get the shakes, those involuntary tiny muscle movements that we rarely notice in the real world, but wreak havoc as we try to place components on a PCB.

To fight the shakes, you can do one of two things: remove the human, or improve the human. Unable to justify a pick and place robot for the former, [Tom] opted to build a quick hand support for surface-mount work, and the results are impressive considering its built entirely of scrap. Its just a three-piece arm with standard butt hinges for joints; mounted so the hinge pins are perpendicular to the work surface and fitted with a horizontal hand rest, it constrains movement to a plane above the PCB. A hole in the hand rest for a small vacuum tip allows [Tom] to pick up a part and place it on the board he reports that the tackiness of the solder paste is enough to remove the SMD from the tip. The video below shows it in action with decent results, but we wonder if an acrylic hand rest might provide better visibility.

Not ready for your own pick and place? Thats understandable; not every shop needs that scale of production. But we think this is a great idea for making SMT approachable to a wider audience.

01:28

Facebook, Cambridge Analytica hit with class-action lawsuit The Hill: Technology Policy

Facebook and Cambridge Analytica were hit with a class-action lawsuit on Tuesday, just hours before Mark Zuckerberg is slated to testify to Congress about how the political consulting firm managed to improperly obtain data on 87 million Facebook...

01:22

Re: Terminal Control Chars Open Source Security

Posted by Jakub Wilk on Apr 10

AFAICT, these terminal emulators are VTE based:

Guake
LXTerminal
ROXTerm
Terminator
gnome-terminal
lilyterm
sakura
tilda
xfce4-terminal

These are not:

Eterm
Konsole
Terminology
Yakuake
aterm
mrxvt
pterm
putty
rxvt
urxvt

01:20

Uber to acquire bike-sharing company The Hill: Technology Policy

Uber is set to acquire an electric bike-sharing start-up, the company announced on Monday.Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said in an online post that it has reached an agreement to buy JUMP Bikes, which currently operates in San Francisco and Washington...

01:07

Uber acquires electric bike share company that tracks people in real-time MassPrivateI


Yesterday, it was announced that Uber acquired Social Bicycles Inc., or Jump Bikes an electric bike share company from New York.

What's wrong with Uber acquiring an electric bike share company you ask?

Jump Bikes is much more than an electric bicycle company.

Jump Bikes tracks customers calories burned and the miles they traveled and lets people share or view other bicyclists personal information, encouraging them to post their results on Twitter and Facebook.

"You may also share your own trip maps and statistics via certain third-party sites such as Facebook or Twitter or by email."

Uber plans to put their electric bikes in smart cities everywhere.

"At Uber, were focused on championing smart technology for smart cities. Today Im excited to announce weve entered into an agreement to acquire JUMP Bikes, an electric, dockless bike-sharing service weve already been testing in San Francisco Dara Khosrowshahi said."  (Click here to find out about the CIA and smart cities.)

Should customers be worried about Uber collecting their personal information?

Two years ago, Reuters revealed that Uber's app collected customers personal data with no way for them to turn it off. And in 2017, Uber was caught secretly spying on LYFT drivers.

Will Uber's Jump Bikes be any different?

They know where you are in real-time

Unfortunately, the answer is no.

It appears that no matter what you rent nowadays, electric ride-share scooters or car rentals, corporation...

01:02

Advocacy group floods Capitol lawn with Zuckerberg cutouts ahead of hearing The Hill: Technology Policy

An advocacy group on Tuesday filled the lawn in front of the Capitol building with cutouts of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg to protest the tech leader ahead of his congressional testimony. Avaaz, which identifies itself as a global advocacy...

01:00

Stable kernel 3.18.104 released LWN.net

The 3.18.104 kernel has been released with a single bugfix. If you had build errors in 3.18.103 then this update is for you, otherwise there is no need to upgrade.

00:52

Security updates for Tuesday LWN.net

Security updates have been issued by CentOS (libvorbis and thunderbird), Debian (pjproject), Fedora (compat-openssl10, java-1.8.0-openjdk-aarch32, libid3tag, python-pip, python3, and python3-docs), Gentoo (ZendFramework), Oracle (thunderbird), Red Hat (ansible, gcc, glibc, golang, kernel, kernel-alt, kernel-rt, krb5, kubernetes, libvncserver, libvorbis, ntp, openssh, openssl, pcs, policycoreutils, qemu-kvm, and xdg-user-dirs), SUSE (openssl and openssl1), and Ubuntu (python-crypto, ubuntu-release-upgrader, and wayland).

00:30

Microservices Explained

Title: 
Microservices Explained

00:27

Mind-Reader Headset Transfers Your Thoughts On Screen with 90% Accuracy HackRead

By Carolina

MIT Media Lab researchers call it AlterEgo headset. Though it sounds

This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: Mind-Reader Headset Transfers Your Thoughts On Screen with 90% Accuracy

00:10

The worlds most popular YouTube video has been hacked Graham Cluley

The worlds most popular YouTube video has been hacked

Hackers have managed to deface an array of popular YouTube music videos, changing titles and thumbnail images.

Read more in my article on the We Live Security blog.

00:04

China forces spyware onto Muslims Android phones, complete with security holes Graham Cluley

Eight million Uyghurs, a Muslim ethnic group, have been ordered by the Chinese authorities to install a spyware app onto their Android smartphones. And its insecure

Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

00:02

Windows 3.x File Manager Open Sourced SoylentNews

The Verge is reporting:

Microsoft is releasing the source code for its original Windows File Manager from nearly 28 years ago. While it's a relic from the past, you can still compile the source code Microsoft has released and run the app on Windows 10 today.

The source code is available on GitHub, and is maintained by Microsoft veteran Craig Wittenberg under the MIT license. Wittenberg copied the File Manager code from Windows NT 4 back in 2007, and has been maintaining it before open sourcing it recently. It's a testament to the backward compatibility of Windows itself, especially that this was originally included in Windows more than 20 years ago.

A port of Microsoft's File Manger made its first appearance in OS/2 1.1 and then became the primary file manager in Windows 3.0.


Original Submission

Read more of this story at SoylentNews.

00:01

Reviewing the HBTool HB-019 Desoldering Iron: It Probably Wont Shock You Hackaday

This unholy lovechild of a cheap solder sucker and an even cheaper soldering iron is the HBTool HB-019 desoldering iron. It came to me for the princely sum of five pounds ($7). So for somewhere between the cost of a pint of foaming ale and the pubs pie and mash Id eat alongside it, what had I got?

Regular Hackaday readers will be familiar with my penchant for ordering cheap tools and other electronic gizmos from the usual suppliers of Far Eastern tech, and subjecting them to review for your entertainment and edification. Sometimes the products are so laughably bad as to be next-to-worthless, other times they show enough promise to be of use, and just occasionally they turn out to be a genuine diamond in the rough, a real discovery. This is no precious stone, but it still makes for an entertaining review.

The Mystery is in the Power Cord

Fresh from the pack, the HB-019 in all its glory.Fresh from the pack, the HB-019 in all its glory.

Taking the unit out of its blister pack, I had what looked like a slight...

00:00

Information security can enable business as soon as we change the conversation Help Net Security

Information security is an enabler for business. This has been a mantra for some time, and although it is repeated at major conferences, the reality is that the lack of good security practices is more a disabler. Take for example the recent Facebook woes, one recent Facebook woes, analysis suggests that the #DeleteFacebook movement reached a peak of 60,000 mentions on Twitter. If we calculate the estimated average revenue per user, this equates to a More

The post Information security can enable business as soon as we change the conversation appeared first on Help Net Security.

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IndyWatch Science and Technology News Feed Today.

Go Forward:1 Day | 2 Days | 7 Days | 30 Days

Tuesday, 10 April

23:55

How the human factor puts your company at risk Help Net Security

Positive Technologies has released a new report with statistics on the success rates of social engineering attacks, based on the 10 largest and most illustrative pentesting projects performed for clients in 2016 and 2017. To verify the security of corporate systems, testers imitated the actions of hackers by sending emails to employees with links to websites, password entry forms, and attachments. In total, 3,332 messages were sent. If the attacks had been real, 17 percent More

The post How the human factor puts your company at risk appeared first on Help Net Security.

23:52

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 Officially Launches Phoronix

After its public beta rounds the past few months, Red Hat today has announced Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 has reached general availability status...

23:28

Dem senator to introduce new data privacy law amid Cambridge Analytica scandal The Hill: Technology Policy

Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) plans to release new legislation Tuesday that would force internet companies such as Facebook, Twitter and Google to get clear permission from consumers about collecting their data.The legislation, aimed at tackling data...

23:12

Some FreeBSD 11.1, 12.0-CURRENT & TrueOS 18.03 Benchmarks Phoronix

In addition to the overhauled/rewritten Windows support, the upcoming Phoronix Test Suite 8.0-Aremark is also featuring much better support for the BSDs. As part of that testing, here are some fresh benchmarks of FreeBSD and TrueOS...

23:11

Live coverage: Facebook's Zuckerberg faces grilling in Congress The Hill: Technology Policy

Mark Zuckerberg will begin his marathon testimony before lawmakers in Washington on Tuesday in what is likely to be a blockbuster hearing and a make-or-break moment for the Facebook CEO.Zuckerberg will testify before lawmakers on the...

23:10

Yarn-like Rechargeable Zinc Battery Could Power Smart Clothes and Wearables IEEE Spectrum Recent Content full text

The zinc yarn battery works when knotted, stretched, cut, and washed Image: American Chemical Society

Researchers have shaped a rechargeable zinc-ion battery into an elastic yarn that churns out power when bent, stretched, washed with water, and even cut.

The zinc yarn battery could be woven into washable sensor-laden smart clothes and integrated into commercial textiles to power wearable displays, electronics, and medical implants.

The yarn joins a line-up of innovative flexible energy-generating and -storing devices that can be integrated into power fabrics. The list includes solar cell ribbons that can be woven into fabrics, knittable supercapacitors, and power-generating yarns that harvest mechanical energy or the triboelectric effect to generate power.

Some researchers have tried to make flexible versions of the workhorse zinc-manganese alkaline battery because of its proven high capacity, low cost, and safety. But these flexible versions have had low capacities. Plus these primary batteries cant be recharged. But researchers have recently come up with high-performance rechargeable zinc-ion batteries.

 Schematic diagram of fabrication and encapsulation of the yarn ZIB Illustration: American Chemical Society Schematic diagram of fabrication and encapsulation of the yarn ZIB

Chunyi Zhi of the City University of Hong Kong and his colleagues made their thread-like rechargeable zinc battery by twisting carbon nanotube fibers into yarn. They coat one piece of yarn with zinc to make an anode and another with manganese dioxide to serve as a cathode. Then they wind the two yarn pieces on an elastic fiber, soak it with a commonly used water-absorbing gel, and encase the device in elastic silicone and a water repellant....

23:05

Despacito YouTube video has been hacked and deleted TechWorm

Despacito music video deleted from YouTube; Adele, Taylor Swift, Drake and Shakiras accounts taken over

In what seems to be a hacker attack, the music video of the hit song Despacito, which had more than five billion views on YouTube has been removed.

The original clips had been posted by Vevo, a music video hosting service that is a collaboration between the big three record companies, Universal Music Group (UMG), Sony Music Entertainment (SME) and Warner Music Group (WMG). Other Vevo channels of artists like Shakira, Selena Gomez, Adele Chris Brown, Maroon 5, Drake and Taylor Swift, were also inaccessible.

For those unaware, the Spanish-language hit Despacito released in January 2017, and went on to break several records in music streaming, including one for the single with the most weeks at No.1 in the U.S., with 16 consecutive weeks. It also became the most-streamed song in the world after reaching 4.6bn plays.

Meanwhile, the Despacito video has been removed, but its cover image shows pictures of five animated and masked people pointing guns at the camera. The hackers, who call themselves Prosox and Kuroish, used the online moniker of KuroiSH and had written Free Palestine below the videos.

The BBC reports that a Twitter account probably belonging to one of the hackers posted: Its just for fun, I just use [the] script youtube-change-title-video and I write hacked.

Dont judge me I love YouTube, it added.

Both YouTube and Vevo have been contacted to comment on the issue.

Source: BBC

The post Despacito YouTube video has been hacked and deleted appeared first on TechWorm.

23:05

Gettys: Mythology about security LWN.net

Jim Gettys refutes the claim that the early designers of Internet software were not concerned about security. "Government export controls crippled Internet security and the design of Internet protocols from the very beginning: we continue to pay the price to this day".

22:52

Apple unveils iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus RED Edition TechWorm

Apple introduces (PRODUCT) RED iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus; available for order from today

Apple yesterday officially announced the launch of the new generation of iPhones, the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition.

The iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus will be enclosed in glass with a matching aluminum band and a black front. Both the iPhones will sport Retina HD display and will be powered by an A11 Bionic chip, which is specifically designed to enhance the augmented reality (AR) experience. The iPhone 8 Plus features dual 12MP cameras, which are capable of taking photos in Portrait mode with Portrait Lighting, bringing dramatic studio lighting effects to iPhone, allowing customers to capture stunning portraits with a shallow depth of field effect in five different lighting styles.

In addition, Apple also introduced a new (PRODUCT) RED iPhone X leather folio case crafted from finished European leather for $99, which will be available for purchase from today.

The aim of launching the red variants of the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus is to support (RED), an organization that raises awareness and funds to help combat HIV/AIDS.

This special edition (PRODUCT)RED iPhone features a stunning red and black color combination and also offers customers the opportunity to make an impact in fighting the spread of HIV and AIDS, said Greg Joswiak, Apples vice president of Product Marketing.

A portion of all proceeds from the products goes to the Global Fund HIV/AIDS grants, which provide testing, counseling, treatment and prevention programs with a specific focus on eliminating transmission of the virus from mothers to their babies.

Since partnering with (RED) in 2006, Apple has donated more than $160 million to the Global Fund, making it the organizations largest corporate donor.

Todays announcement is further evidence of Apples leadership in and commitment to the AIDS fight since the beginning of (RED) in 2006, said Deborah Dugan, (RED)s CEO. The more than $160 million Apple has donated in the last 11 years today equates to more than 800 million days of life-saving ARV medication that prevents the transmission of HIV from mothers to their babies. Were honored that Apple has dedicated its resources to our purpose, and cant wait to see customers bring our mission to life through the purchase of iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition.

The iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition will be available in 64GB and 256GB models with a starting price of $699. Starting today, the iPhones are available to order online in select countries and regions and in stores beginning April 13.

The iPhones will start arriving in stores on April 13 in Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Japan, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, the U.K. and, of course, the United States. These will be followed by Brazil, Denmark, Ireland, Ital...

22:51

Public services at the Caribbean island Sint Maarten shut down by a cyber attack Security Affairs

A cyber attack shut down the entire government infrastructure of the Caribbean island Sint Maarten. public services were interrupted.

A massive cyber attack took offline the entire government infrastructure of the Caribbean island Sint Maarten. it is a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

Government building remained closed after the attack.

The Ministry of General Affairs hereby informs the public that the recovery process of the Government of Sint Maarten ICT Network is progressing steadily and will continue throughout the upcoming weekend following the cyber-attack on Monday April 2nd reported the media.  

According to the local media, The Daily Herald a cyber attack hit the country on April 2nd, the good news is that yesterday the government services were resumed with the exception of the Civil Registry Department.

Sint Maarten hacking

According to the authorities, this is the third attack in over a year, but at the time of writing, there are no public details on the assault.

The system was hacked on Easter Monday, the third such attack in over a year. No further details about the hacking have been made public by government.
The Ministry thanked the people of St. Maarten for their patience during this period. continues the announcement.

Below the announcement made by the Government on Facebook.

 

The incident demonstrates the importance of a cyber strategy for any government, in this case, hacked shut...

22:42

How to minimize healthcare supply chain threats Help Net Security

There are many reasons why healthcare institutions have poor cybersecurity: most resources go towards providing patient care and not enough is left for cybersecurity; not all hospitals have a dedicated cybersecurity team; cybersecurity policies and authentication procedures are difficult to implement due to many users who rotate within the hospital, and more. In a recent paper, though, Trend Micro researchers zeroed in on two particular risks these organizations are susceptible to and they dont feel More

The post How to minimize healthcare supply chain threats appeared first on Help Net Security.

22:38

Defense in depth -- the Microsoft way (part 53): our MSRC doesn't know how Windows handles PATH Bugtraq

Posted by Stefan Kanthak on Apr 10

Hi @ll,

on their "Security Research & Defense" blog, members of Microsoft's
Security Response Center recently posted
<https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/srd/2018/04/04/triaging-a-dll-planting-vulnerability/>

This blog post but clearly shows that the MSRC doesn't know how Windows
handles the PATH!

Error #1
~~~~~~~~

| The directories that are in the PATH environment variable are always
| admin ACLed and a normal...

22:31

secuvera-SA-2017-04: SQL-Injection Vulnerability in OCS Inventory NG ocsreports Web application Bugtraq

Posted by Simon Bieber on Apr 10

Affected Products
OCS Inventory NG ocsreports 2.4
OCS Inventory NG ocsreports 2.3.1
(older/other releases have not been tested)
References
https://www.secuvera.de/advisories/secuvera-SA-2017-04.txt (used for updates)
https://www.ocsinventory-ng.org/en/ocs-inventory-server-2-4-1-has-been-released/ (Release announcement of OCS
Inventory 2.4.1)

Summary:
Open Computer and Software Inventory Next Generation (OCS inventory NG) is...

22:31

Scientists Breed Bacteria That Make Tiny High-Energy Carbon Rings SoylentNews

Caltech scientists have created a strain of bacteria that can make small but energy-packed carbon rings that are useful starting materials for creating other chemicals and materials. These rings, which are otherwise particularly difficult to prepare, now can be "brewed" in much the same way as beer.

The bacteria were created by researchers in the lab of Frances Arnold, Caltech's Linus Pauling Professor of Chemical Engineering, Bioengineering and Biochemistry, using directed evolution, a technique Arnold developed in the 1990s. The technique allows scientists to quickly and easily breed bacteria with the traits that they desire. It has previously been used by Arnold's lab to evolve bacteria that create carbon-silicon and carbon-boron bonds, neither of which is found among organisms in the natural world. Using this same technique, they set out to build the tiny carbon rings rarely seen in nature.

"Bacteria can now churn out these versatile, energy-rich organic structures," Arnold says. "With new lab-evolved enzymes, the microbes make precisely configured strained rings that chemists struggle to make."

Read more of this story at SoylentNews.

22:30

[SECURITY] [DSA 4170-1] pjproject security update Bugtraq

Posted by Moritz Muehlenhoff on Apr 10

-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Debian Security Advisory DSA-4170-1 security () debian org
https://www.debian.org/security/ Moritz Muehlenhoff
April 09, 2018 https://www.debian.org/security/faq
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Package : pjproject
CVE ID : CVE-2017-16872 CVE-2017-16875...

22:24

secuvera-SA-2017-03: Reflected Cross-Site-Scripting Vulnerabilities in OCS Inventory NG ocsreports Web application Bugtraq

Posted by Simon Bieber on Apr 10

Affected Products
OCSInventory-ocsreports 2.4
(older releases have not been tested)
References
https://www.secuvera.de/advisories/secuvera-SA-2017-03.txt (used for updates)
https://www.ocsinventory-ng.org/en/ocs-inventory-server-2-4-1-has-been-released/ (Release announcement of OCS
Inventory 2.4.1)

Summary:
Open Computer and Software Inventory Next Generation (OCS inventory NG) is free software that enables users to
inventory...

22:13

Change to ASF httpd vulnerability XML format Open Source Security

Posted by Mark Cox on Apr 10

Various OSS projects I've been involved with use a master vulnerability
database in XML used for various internal functions such as generating web
pages. I know some folks monitor or use/convert these XML feeds too even
though we've not really publicised them or given them a schema.

Later today I will be performing a major update to the Apache HTTP Server
XML file[1] so that each CVE has a unique entry (rather than currently
where the...

21:56

Majority calls for more regulations against Facebook: poll The Hill: Technology Policy

A majority of Americans say tougher government regulations are needed to rein in the power of Facebook and other social media companies, according to a CBS News/YouGov poll released Tuesday.About 60 percent of voters told pollsters that...

21:53

DevOps Success: Why Continuous Is a Key Word

When implementing DevOps initiatives, the word continuous is the key to success. Most Agile schemes today incorporate concepts and strategies that can and should  be implemented at all times throughout the SDLC. The most important to recognize throughout your teams development cycle are Continuous Integration (CI), Continuous Testing (CT) and Continuous Delivery (CD). 

21:49

Oregon passes net neutrality law The Hill: Technology Policy

Oregon became the second state to pass its own net neutrality law on Monday, following Washington states landmark move last month.Gov. Kate Brown (D) signed a bill aimed at blocking internet service providers, like AT&T and Comcast, from...

21:47

Vevo YouTube account hacked; popular celebs affected Despacito video deleted HackRead

By Waqas

The official YouTube account of Vevo video hosting giant has

This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: Vevo YouTube account hacked; popular celebs affected Despacito video deleted

21:30

Steps executives are taking to increase security while launching new ways to pay Help Net Security

More than 80 percent of organizations that have been impacted by a data breach have introduced a new security framework and 79 percent have reduced employee access to customer data, according to new benchmark data, 2018 Global Payments Insight Survey: Bill Pay Services, from ACI Worldwide and Ovum. The benchmark, comprised of responses from executives at billing organizations such as consumer finance, healthcare and higher education, also revealed that over 70 percent of organizations that More

The post Steps executives are taking to increase security while launching new ways to pay appeared first on Help Net Security.

21:21

Making Cloud-Native Computing Universal and Sustainable

The original seed project for CNCF was Kubernetes, as orchestration is a critical piece of moving toward a cloud-native infrastructure.

21:06

Re: Terminal Control Chars Open Source Security

Posted by Christian Brabandt on Apr 10

FWIW: The vim poc has been "fixed" as of
https://github.com/vim/vim/releases/tag/v8.0.1587

That was also the conclusion on the vim-dev list.

There is a similar Debian bug report against rxvt-unicode where the same
conclusion is drawn:
https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=787628#15

And the corresponding mozilla/firefox bug:
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=637895

Best,
Christian

21:00

The Forgotten Workstation: Sun JavaStation Hackaday

These days, conversations about Java tend to center around Oracle and Google fighting it out in court. But back in 1996, Sun was the keeper of Java and promoted it heavily. They even released a diskless workstation that only runs Java applets. The Sun JavaStation was affectionately called the Mr. Coffee and [Cameron Gray] wants to show you how it worked and whats inside of it.

A single screw frees the innards from the small case. Inside looks like a dense PC from the era, although the parts inside are a far cry from a typical PC. The CPU was a 110 MHz microSPARC II soldered directly to the motherboard. The four RAM slots could take up to 64 megabytes of PC RAM.

Unlike Suns full-blown workstations, the JavaStation took standard PC peripherals. For example, the monitor connection is a standard VGA and there are normal PS/2 keyboard and mouse ports. The driver for this box was price, so having cheap commodity I/O was a selling point.

[Camerons] JavaStation had lost its configuration, so he had to use a serial terminal to reset some key parameters. After that, the machine was able to boot itself over its network connection. The operating system is no surprise JavaOS.

By the way, if you happen to have one of these boxes, they can run Linux. Turns out running Linux makes the box faster than the original JavaOS and offers better software choices, too. You can see Corel Office, for example, running on the box and [Cameron] says the slow loading of applications and performance was the chief complaint among users.

These were supplanted by the Sun Ray thin client, which weve seen converted into a Raspberry Pi computer. Of course, if you just want a thin client, you dont need to go retro to do that.

 

20:59

Consumer Groups Urge Zuckerberg To Commit Facebook To Global GDPR SoylentNews

Facebook should adopt stringent EU data protection rules as a global "baseline" for all of the social network's services, consumer activists say in an open letter that contends the rules will help ensure the company is accountable and transparent.

The Transatlantic Consumer Dialogue, a coalition of US and European consumer groups, called on CEO Mark Zuckerberg to adopt the EU's General Data Protection Regulation to govern his company's platform. The sweeping regulation, known by the abbreviation GDPR, gives Europeans more control over their personal data and compels companies to notify consumers of data breaches within 72 hours. It also expands the types of information that are considered personal data.

"The GDPR provides a solid foundation for data protection, establishing clear responsibilities for companies that collect personal data and clear rights for users whose data is gathered," TCD said in its letter. "These are protections that all users should be entitled to no matter where they are located."

[...] In its letter, the Transatlantic Consumer Dialogue suggested the GDPR represents the gold standard in data protection, telling Zuckerberg that "there is simply no reason for your company to provide less than the best legal standards currently available to protect the privacy of Facebook users."

It urged Zuckerberg to express his commitment "to global compliance with GDPR and provide specific details on how the company plans to implement these changes" in his Congressional testimony. 

[...] Facebook declined to comment for this story, but executives have previously commented on GDPR and similar subjects.


Original Submission

Read more of this story at SoylentNews.

20:58

Publisher Gets Carte Blanche to Seize New Sci-Hub Domains TorrentFreak

While Sci-Hub is loved by thousands of researchers and academics around the world, copyright holders are doing everything in their power to wipe if off the web.

Following a $15 million defeat against Elsevier last June, the American Chemical Society (ACS) won a default judgment of $4.8 million in copyright damages a few months later.

The publisher was further granted a broad injunction, requiring various third-party services to stop providing access to the site. This includes domain registries, hosting companies and search engines.

Soon after the order was signed, several of Sci-Hubs domain names became unreachable as domain registries and Cloudflare complied with the court order. Still, Sci-Hub remained available all this time, with help from several newly registered domain names.

Frustrated by Sci-Hubs resilience, ACS recently went back to court asking for an amended injunction. The publisher requested the authority to seize any and all Sci-Hub domain names, also those that will be registered in the future.

Plaintiff has been forced to engage in a game of whac-a-mole whereby new sci-hub domain names emerge, ACS informed the court.

Further complicating matters, some registries, registrars, and Internet service providers have refused to disable newer Sci-Hub domain names that were not specifically identified in the Complaint or the injunction

Soon after the request was submitted, US District Court Judge Leonie Brinkema agreed to the amended language.

The amended injunction now requires search engines, hosting companies, domain registrars, and other service or software providers, to cease facilitating access to Sci-Hub. This includes, but is not limited to, the following domain names.

sci-hub.ac, scihub.biz, sci-hub.bz, sci-hub.cc, sci-hub.cf, sci-hub.cn, sci-hub.ga, sci-hub.gq, scihub.hk, sci-hub.is, sci-hub.la, sci-hub.name, sci-hub.nu, sci-hub.nz, sci-hub.onion, scihub22266oqcxt.onion, sci-hub.tw, and sci-hub.ws.

From the injunction

The new inju...

20:52

CVE-2018-1097 Foreman: oVirt credentials exposed by host power API Open Source Security

Posted by Tomer Brisker on Apr 10

An information disclosure vulnerability was discovered in the host power
API in Foreman.
When sending a power action to a host provisioned on an oVirt compute
resource, the API responded with details of the compute resource, including
credentials in clear text.

This issue affect Foreman 1.3 or newer.
A fix is included in the 1.16.1 release.
Details are available at http://projects.theforeman.org/issues/22546

20:48

NIR Compile Times Are Being Lowered Thanks To Latest Mesa Patches Phoronix

The latest driver optimization work by Timothy Arceri on Valve's Linux GPU driver team has been working on function inlining within NIR rather than within the GLSL IR optimizations. The net result is faster NIR compile times that benefit the Intel OpenGL driver and also help with RadeonSI Gallium3D...

20:37

Feral Releases "GameMode" System Tool For Linux, Currently Sets CPU Scaling Governor Phoronix

Ahead of this month's Rise of the Tomb Raider Linux release, Feral Interactive has released a new system tool for Linux called GameMode...

20:33

EPO in Low Profile Mode, Only to be Mentioned in Relation to Indias Oil Drilling/Miners Techrights

Profile low

Summary: The European Patent Office (EPO) decides to grant a patent to Oil India Limited (OIL) and the Indian media goes insane

THE famous rejection of software patents in India is exactly the opposite of what has been happening at the EPO, more so under Battistelli. We quite like and very much appreciate Indias attitude towards patents; the country takes nothing for granted and actually assesses the impact of particular patent families on the general population. India is a software powerhouse and programmers reject software patents with almost no exception (none that were aware of).

Karry Lai, based in Hong Kong, said yesterday that [a]fter the retirement of Honble Justice K N Basha on May 13 2016, Indias Intellectual Property Appellate Board (IPAB) was almost non-functional for 19 months.

India is a software powerhouse and programmers reject software patents with almost no exception (none that were aware of).We covered this before. IPAB is only vaguely similar to PTAB in the US and BoA in Europe. Its a similar acronym, but they arent quite the same.

What was most curious, however, was yesterdays news in India. Even the English-speaking sites alone. Millions (or about a million per year) of patents get granted. Need there be a news article about each of these? Why did the Millennium Post decide to write a whole article about one? Authorities at European Patent Office (EPO) have communicated their decision to grant patent to Oil India Limited (OIL) for an invention titled A method for preventing wax deposition in oil wells with packers, it says. EnergyInfraPost said the same and so did...

20:32

ZFS On Linux 0.7.8 Released To Deal With Possible Data Loss Phoronix

If you have been using ZOL 0.7.7 that was released last month, you will want to upgrade right away to ZFS On Linux 0.7.8...

20:25

Re: Re: Terminal Control Chars Open Source Security

Posted by Jakub Wilk on Apr 10

* Not Real <theborland1 () gmail com>, 2018-04-09, 13:35:

The thread subject is not as informative as it could be. The original
post was about pasting control characters. While the problem is not
new[0], I don't recall it being ever discussed on oss-security before.

OTOH, this is about terminal escape injection, an entirely different
problem, and a frequent topic on oss-security.

[0] The original post links to...

20:20

How is Fintech Making Credit Cards and Personal Loans Easier to Get? TechWorm

Fintech firms have exploded onto the financial scene in Singapore and other mature markets in Asia in recent times. Focusing on disruptive technologies like peer-to-peer lending, affordable digital payment solutions, and more accurate risk analysis among other things, these startups are winning over customers by replacing the service delivery model used by traditional banks with user-friendly technologies.

Fintechs are lowering the cost of customer acquisition by reducing processing costs, by improving user experience, and by developing stronger APIs that make collaboration with partner institutions easier. They are also offering their partners more points of acceptance of loan/credit card applications and access to more traffic without having to invest in new infrastructure setup.

Customers arent complaining either. Thats because they get curated content and information about credit cards, loans, and other financial products at one place. By leaving the grunt work to these fintechs, customers can simply focus on identifying the right product based on their need. With the help of filters, they can make the shortlisting process effortless and quick.

Fintech Companies Are Changing the Process of Loan Offtake

Have you ever heard about Crowdo, Capital Springboard, FundedHere, or MoolahSense? These are peer-to-peer online lending sites through which you can raise funds by sharing your story. These crowdfunding sites are revolutionising the alternative lending space through disintermediation, cost optimisation, quicker delivery, and technology modernisation.

There is no need for paperwork or running. The online mediator simply charges you a brokerage for letting you use their domain.

Players like Skolafund provide deserving students a chance to get funded by potential funders for pursuing education in an affordable manner. They can match profiles and ensure that the right student meets the right funder.

SMEs, often ignored by traditional banking channels, have found their go-to source for funds. Crowd Genie, which started in 2016, is helping SMEs get loans through crowdfunding.

Even for fintechs focused on traditional loans and credit cards, theyre releasing the hidden value in the delivery chain, benefiting all the stakeholders in the process.

If youre wondering, how information aggregator sites like BankBazaar are making a difference, here is your answer.

Synthesising Information for You

While bank websites can give you information, they cant always show you the full picture. Comparison sites allow you to compare...

20:13

DragonFlyBSD 5.2 Now Available With HAMMER2 Improvements & Spectre Mitigation Phoronix

DragonFlyBSD 5.2 is now available as the latest installment of this popular BSD operating system...

19:58

Qt 5.11 Beta 3 Released, RC1 Due Out Soon Phoronix

The third beta of the upcoming Qt 5.11 tool-kit release is now available and it shouldn't be much longer before the release candidate is christened...

19:44

Broadcom VC5 Driver Making Good Progress With Using AMDGPU's DRM Scheduler Phoronix

Last month I wrote about Broadcom's Eric Anholt exploring the use of AMDGPU's DRM scheduler within the in-development Video Core V (VC5) DRM driver. That work has panned out and looks like it will eventually work out for this open-source Broadcom graphics driver...

19:40

Microsoft Open Sources the Original File Manager of the 90s TechWorm

Microsoft open sources Windows 3.0 File Manager code in GitHub

Its time for folks from the 1990s to get nostalgic, as Microsoft has open sourced the Windows 3.0 File Manager released 28 years ago. This file manager was a replacement for managing files through MS-DOS, which allowed Windows users to copy, move, delete, and search for files.

Veteran Microsoft developer Craig Wittenberg, who had copied the code in 2007 from Windows NT 4, has been maintaining it privately under the MIT license before open sourcing it recently. The source code Microsoft has released can be compiled and even run on Windows 10.

Heres a portion of the projects README.md file:

  1. There are two primary versions of the source code in the master branch:

original_plus tag: refers to the source for WinFile as of Windows NT4 with minimal changes so that it compiles with Visual Studio and runs on current Windows.

  1. current master: contains my personal changes / additions to WinFile.

File Manager actually uses an MDI, or multiple-document interface, to display multiple folders within the main application window. Most of the MSFT open source stuff is either trash or completely unmaintained, one Hacker News reader noted following the release. Only a couple of high profile projects are maintained and they jam opt-out telemetry in if you like it or not (despite hundreds of comments requesting them to go away). Even Scott Hanselman getting involved in one of our tickets got it nowhere. Same strong arming and disregard for customers.

For those who are interested in reliving the 1990s, can just go to the GitHub page here to download the Windows File Manager for Windows 10.

Source: The Verge

The post Microsoft Open Sources the Original File Manager of the 90s appeared first on TechWorm.

19:31

Microsofts Extortion Racket Against GNU/Linux Carries on, Both Directly and Indirectly (via Patent Trolls) Techrights

Trolls' harbour

Summary: An outline of Microsofts patent activities and the activities of its satellites, which pass around patents and sue Microsofts rivals through obscure trolls (set up solely for the purpose of these lawsuits)

THE worlds biggest troll feeder is Microsoft, which not only feeds (in the investment sense) Intellectual Ventures, the worlds largest patent troll that in turn feeds (with patents) Dominion Harbor. Dominion Harbor is suing a lot of companies through subsidiaries. Microsoft also fed (in the investment sense) Finjan, one of the most vocal patent trolls, which is also publicly traded (they had a meeting with shareholders a week ago, discussing their blackmail plans). This post will cover all these trolls and their feeders, assuring readers that Microsoft loves Linux as much as the Greek like Turks.

When the thugs from Microsofts IP subsidiary accuse an OEM of patent infringement they throw hundreds of patents at them in order to ensure they cannot challenge them all individually (or it would be vastly more expensive than just settling). This is racketeering.Yesterday we saw this Apple patents propaganda site saying that Microsoft Wins a Patent for a Possible Surface Branded Folding Smartphone with Sophisticated Camera System & more (more gimmicks).

Putting aside the fact that theres prior art all over this, what would be the purpose given that Microsoft barely sells anything in this space? When the thugs from Microsofts IP subsidiary accuse an OEM of patent infringement they throw hundreds of patents at them in order to ensure they cannot challenge them all individually (or it would be vastly more expensive than just settling). This is racketeering. Its also a deterrence against legal challenges to dubious patents.

Heres what the latest patent is about:

...

19:27

Novartis Acquires AveXis for $8.7 Billion in a Big Bet on Gene Therapy SoylentNews

Novartis International AG has acquired AveXis, Inc. in order to gain access to its main drug, AVXS-101, a gene therapy treatment for spinal muscular atrophy, and bolster its gene therapy expertise. Novartis's CEO expects AVXS-101 to generate billions in sales:

Novartis AG agreed to acquire AveXis Inc. for $8.7 billion to gain a promising drug to treat a rare disease that afflicts infants, hastening a shift toward gene therapy and precision medicines. Shareholders of the Bannockburn, Illinois-based company will receive $218 a share in cash in a tender offer, Novartis said in a statement Monday. The price is 88 percent above where AveXis closed Friday.

The transaction is Novartis's second deal to advance in gene therapy this year -- and the first led by new Chief Executive Officer Vas Narasimhan. The Swiss drugmaker is redeploying some of the $13 billion in proceeds from the sale of its stake in a consumer-health joint venture to partner GlaxoSmithKline Plc to gain more firepower in prescription medicines before some of its existing best-sellers lose patent protection. "Our goal is to build on a core of medicines as a medicines company powered by data and digital," Narasimhan said in a conference call with investors. "A deal like this fits right in that sweet spot."

AveXis is developing a product to treat spinal muscular atrophy, an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by a defect in a single gene, which shows the potential to become a blockbuster, according to Novartis.

About 1 in 10,000 people are affected by a type of spinal muscular atrophy. AVXS-101 currently has "breakthrough therapy" designation in the U.S.

Also at Reuters.


Original Submission

Read more of this story at SoylentNews.

19:16

CVE-2017-13220 / Android A-63527053: Linux kernel: Possible out-of-bound access in Bluetooth subsystem Open Source Security

Posted by Vladis Dronov on Apr 10

Hello,

There was a flaw CVE-2017-13220 / Android A-63527053 reported in Android
security bulletin with not much of public details:

https://source.android.com/security/bulletin/pixel/2018-01-01#kernel-components

Per discussion with Android security developer this flaw is related to
an upstream commit 51bda2bca53b ("Bluetooth: hidp_connection_add() unsafe
use of l2cap_pi()").

Red Hat is handling this flaw in:...

19:04

How Many Linux Users Are There Anyway?

True, desktop Linux has never taken off. But, even so, Linux has millions of desktop users. Don't believe me? Let's look at the numbers.

18:58

Re: Terminal Control Chars Open Source Security

Posted by Gordo Lowrey on Apr 10

I'm just gonna go out on a limb here, and say this is an unfounded
assertion.

Perhaps the correct solution would be to prevent the browser from
copying invisible characters.

If you're going to break some basic mechanic of human computer
interaction, at least don't break my damn terminal (not that I use VTE,
it doesn't support OSC 52, among others), but the principle stands...
Instead of worrying about sanitizing what is...

18:33

IAM Churning Out Support for the Software Patents and HEVC Lobby Techrights

Pushing software patents even in Korea

KAISTSummary: The proponents of software patents (for personal financial reasons) carry on promoting HEVC, which is neither necessary nor beneficial; in fact, patents that it is built upon are software patents, which are almost entirely invalid (upon legal challenge)

THERES an abundance of free codecs these days. Multimedia can be properly encoded and compressed using Free (as in freedom as well as price) software. Ogg, VP8/9 and various other options exist with similar ones for real-time streaming. But there are those who want to pocket billions of dollars by pushing to the public typically through the World Wide Web patent-encumbered and nonfree formats/standards. This isnt a new problem, but it still needs tackling.

As we noted the other day, IAMs latest issue (magazine) contained HEVC boosting. see HEVC articles in Techrights (old and more recent) for background on this; its pretty nasty a substitute if not sequel for the MPEG thicket (enforced by a patent troll). Richard Lloyd, the software patents pusher, was flagrantly pushing HEVC yesterday. To quote:

As IAM has covered over the last few years, patent pools appear to be gaining in popularity, in part because the tough licensing environment has encouraged patent owners in particular to seek out ways to make the dealmaking process much more efficient. In the last couple of years we have seen the emergence of two new platforms Avanci and Velos Media focused on mobile technology in auto and the Internet of Things and video compression respectively, while others such as Via Licensing have overhauled their approach to emerging markets such as China.

[...]

However in contrast to MPEG-2 where the MPEG-LA administered pool...

18:18

Weekend Reading: Sysadmin 101

This series covers sysadmin basics. The first article explains how to approach alerting and on-call rotations as a sysadmin. In the second article, I discuss how to automate yourself out of a job, and in the third, I explain why and how you should use tickets.

18:15

Booby-trapped Office docs build with ThreadKit trigger CVE-2018-4878 flaw Security Affairs

Microsoft Office documents created with the exploit builder kit dubbed ThreadKit now include the code for CVE-2018-4878 flaw exploitation.

At the end of March, security experts at Proofpoint discovered a Microsoft Office document exploit builder kit dubbed ThreadKit that has been used to spread a variety of malware, including banking Trojans and RATs (i.e. TrickbotChthonicFormBook and Loki Bot).

The exploit kit was first discovered in October 2017, but according to the experts, crooks are using it at least since June 2017.

The ThreadKit builder kit shows similarities to Microsoft Word Intruder (MWI), it was initially being advertised in a forum post as a builder for weaponized decoy documents.

Just after its appearance, documents created with the ThreadKit builder kit have been observed in several campaigns.

Now threat actors are using the ThreadKit builder kit to target the recently patched CVE-2018-4878 Flash vulnerability, experts started observing exploit code samples in the wild a few days ago.

ThreadKit adobe flaws

Adobe addressed the CVE-2018-4878 in February after North Koreas APT group was spotted exploiting it in targeted attacks.

The vulnerability could be exploited by an attack by tricking victims into opening a document, web page or email containing a specially crafted Flash file.

According to the researcher Simon Choi the Flash Player flaw has been...

18:00

Leap Motion Announces Open Source Augmented Reality Headset Hackaday

Leap Motion just dropped what may be the biggest tease in Augmented and Virtual Reality since Google Cardboard. The North Star is an augmented reality head-mounted display that boasts some impressive specs:

  • Dual 16001440 LCDs
  • 120Hz refresh rate
  • 100 degree FOV
  • Cost under $100 (in volume)
  • Open Source Hardware
  • Built-in Leap Motion camera for precise hand tracking

Yes, you read that last line correctly. The North Star will be open source hardware. Leap Motion is planning to drop all the hardware information next week.

Now that weve got you excited, lets mention what the North Star is not its not a consumer device. Leap Motions idea here was to create a platform for developing Augmented Reality experiences the user interface and interaction aspects. To that end, they built the best head-mounted display they could on a budget. The company started with standard 5.5 cell phone displays, which made for an incredibly high resolution but low framerate (50 Hz) device. It was also large and completely unpractical.

The current iteration of the North Star uses much smaller displays, which results in a higher frame rate and a better overall experience.  The secret sauce seems to be Leaps use of ellipsoidal mirrors to achieve a large FOV while maintaining focus.

Were excited,...

17:55

Apple's 2019 Mac Pro Will be Shaped by Workflows SoylentNews

Submitted via IRC for fyngyrz

A year ago, I visited the Apple campus in Cupertino to figure out where the hell the new Mac Pro was. I joined a round table discussion with Apple SVPs and a handful of reporters to get the skinny on what was taking so long. The answer, it turns out, was that Apple had decided to start completely over with the Mac Pro, introduce completely new pro products like the iMac Pro and refresh the entire MacBook Pro lineup.

[...] In that discussion a year ago, Apple SVP Phil Schiller acknowledged that pro customers, including developers, were hungry for evidence that Apple was paying attention to their needs. "We recognize that they want to hear more from us. And so we want to communicate better with them. We want them to understand the importance they have for us, we want them to understand that we're investing in new Macs not only new MacBook Pros and iMacs but Mac Pros for them, we want them to know we are going to work on a display for a modular system," Schiller said.

[...] While there are no further details on the exact shape that the Mac Pro will take, Boger says they are still very much in the modular mindset. [...]What shape that modularity takes is another matter entirely, of course. I know some people have been pining for the days of internal expansion card configurations with standardized hardware and maybe that is the way that this will go. But on Tuesday I also got a tour of the editing suites where Mac hardware and software is pushed to the limits, including extensive use of eGPU support, and a different vision emerges.

[...] All we currently know about the Mac Pro is that it's modular and that it's being shaped by the feedback from those pros in-house, as well as external conversations with developers and professional users.

[...] As a side note, by the way, I wouldn't expect to see any more info about Mac Pro at WWDC in June. Maybe Apple will surprise on that front, but I think for anything further about Mac Pro we're going to have to wait for next year.

Source: https://techcrunch.com/2018/04/05/apples-2019-imac-pro-will-be-shaped-by-workflows/


Original Submission

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17:24

Linux open source utility Beep is affected by several vulnerabilitues Security Affairs

Researchers have discovered several vulnerabilities in the Linux command line tool Beep, some experts suggest to remove the utility from distros.

An unnamed security researcher has found several vulnerabilities in the Linux command line tool Beep, including a severe flaw introduced by a patch for a privilege escalation vulnerability.

Beep is a small open source utility used in the past by Linux developers to produce a beep with a computers internal speaker, it allows users to control the pitch, duration, and repetitions of the sound.

The researcher discovered a race condition in the utility that could be exploited by an attacker to escalate privileges to root. Versions through 1.3.4 are affected by the flaw that was tracked as CVE-2018-0492.

Further info on the flaw is available on the website holeybeep.ninja

holey beep

Is your system vulnerable? In order to discover if a system is vulnerable it is possible to run the following command:

curl https://holeybeep.ninja/am_i_vulnerable.sh | sudo bash

A vulnerable machine will beep.

The Holey Beep website also provides a patch, but experts noticed that it actually introduces a potentially more serious vulnerability that could be exploited to execute an arbitrary code on the patched system.

The patch vulnerability seems more severe to me, as people apply patches all the time (they shouldnt do it as root, but people are people), reads a message published by Tony Hoyle on the Debian bug tracker. Its concerning that the holeybeep.ninja site exploited an unrelated fault for fun without apparently telling anyone.

Beep is also affected by other issues, including integer overflow vulnerabilities, and a...

17:22

Why nuclear fusion is gaining steam again Lifeboat News: The Blog

As fusion becomes more technically viable, its time to assess whether its worth the money because breakthroughs in the lab dont guarantee success in the marketplace.

17:01

FBI raid on Trump's Lawyer has just taken place Terra Forming Terra

FBI raid on Trump's Lawyer has just taken place and this indicates an attempted Coup against  POTUS regardless of the legal niceties.

This is now very dangerous and will lead to real fireworks along with all the other distractions now been launched by the DEEP STATE.

 
 Apr 10 2018 00:48:24 (EST) !xowAT4Z3VQ ID: 466abe 979213NEW

>>979093
TRUST SESSIONS.
TRUST WRAY.
TRUST KANSAS.
TRUST HOROWITZ.
TRUST HUBER.
Q
1121Apr 10 2018 00...

17:00

Qanon Iran Rumbles Situation Frantic Terra Forming Terra

 
 We really cannot take our eyes of the ball for the past three days with Q.  No one believes Assad pulled that Gas Attack and from this it is also obvious that verification is been interfered with in an effort to precipitate war which only the Deep State wants or needs.

So far it is an alleged Gas attack.  And Suddenly Iran is chiming in.  It appears that all strings are been pulled in what we want to characterize as a desperate attempt to trigger war.  

I posted yesterday that it appears confirmed through Q that POTUS, Putin and Xi have allied to end the whole NWO apparatus.  Add in POTUS access to complete communications intelligence and throw in obvious Intel sharing - Saudi Arabis the most visible - and it is becomes obvious that Deep State principals are been neutralized all over the globe.

The TRIUMVERATE has decided to brook no challenge to their global power from any such secret conspiracy that is underwritten by criminal activity and knows no loyalty.  And why should they, but they needed POTUS on the same page and that has come.

As i have warned it is now getting hot and we do not know what the general plan actually entails and we should not.  I expect the North Korean situation to reach formal resolution by mid May.  And this latest rumble is the Iranians keying up for a full confrontation.  They do appear to be next on the menu.



Apr 9 2018 19:49:30 (EST) Q !xowAT4Z3VQ ID: 0cd760...

17:00

Unknown Flying Creature Photographed in Chicago Suburb Terra Forming Terra



Here a real expert observer has seem this creature.  This is great because it eliminate plausible doubt.  This is a positive negative identification and the only thing better is a positive identification.  Difficult to acquire but here it is.

And yes, from this photo, i do think that i have seen this creature myself back around 1965 hovering over our fields in search of prey.  The one i saw was likely a juvenile as the coloration was grey.  In either case we are surely looking at the legendary Thunderbird whose life way we have partially pieced together.

This is not the same as what has been seen in a spate of sightings around Chicago.
.

Unknown Flying Creature Photographed in Chicago Suburb

Friday, March 30, 2018

The Chicago Phantom Task Force received the following information from our team member Vance Nesbitt:


Thursday March 29, 2018

12:30 PM CST

http://www.phantomsandmonsters.com/2018/03/unknown-flying-creature-photographed-in.html?

As a standard routine for the company that employs me, lunch time is usually 12:00 to 12:45 PM. My job description however puts me on the road for the logistics portion of the business during those hours. With the upcoming Easter holiday, schedules have changed with some clients of ours and I happened to be at the home office in St. Charles, Il during the lunch break.

I was outside the building at 12:30 PM or very close to that time by myself.

I know by habit that my friend and co-worker Bill comes out to have a smoke around that time. I was facing south leaning against the tall guardrail in the driveway, when my attention was grabbed from the top of my eye.

I took a moment to to figure out what I was looking at and soon realized it was a bird. It had circled once in a huge diameter and before it were to head out of view. This thing was enormous. I say that by the speed in which it circled seemed so slow and it moved like a circling airplane with no wing flap.

I literally ran to my desk from outside which is only 10 fe...

17:00

33 Amazing and Proven Benefits of CBD Oil Terra Forming Terra


 
 
This is an extensive list of what we have learned and makes the case for CBD.  
 
Amazingly it helps kick nicotine addiction.  This is important.
...

17:00

The Case Against an Autonomous Military - Facts So Romantic Nautilus


The potential harm of AIs deliberately designed to kill in warfare is much more pressing than self-driving car accidents.Photograph by Airman 1st Class James Thompson / U.S. Air Force

In 2016, a Mercedes-Benz executive was quoted as saying that the companys self-driving autos would put the safety of its own occupants first. This comment brought harsh reactions about luxury cars mowing down innocent bystanders until the company walked back the original statement. Yet protecting the driver at any cost is what drivers want: A recently published study in Science (available to read on arXiv) shows that, though in principle people want intelligent cars to save as many lives as possible (like avoiding hitting a crowd of children, for example), they also want a car that will protect its occupants first.

It would be hard to trust this algorithm because wethe humans nominally in charge of the A.I.dont ourselves have the right ethical answer to this dilemma. Besides, and potentially worse, the algorithm itself might change. No matter how a cars A.I. is initially programmed, if it is designed to learn and improve itself as it drives, it may act unpredictably in a complicated accident, perhaps in ways that
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16:34

Transparent network audio with mpd & sndiod OpenBSD Journal

Landry Breuil (landry@ when wearing his developer hat) wrote in

I've been a huge fan of MPD over the years to centralize my audio collection, and i've been using it with the http output to stream the music as a radio on the computer i'm currently using

Read more

16:23

Northrop Grumman's Faulty Payload Adapter Reportedly Responsible for "Zuma" Failure SoylentNews

Northrop Grumman, rather than SpaceX, is reportedly responsible for the loss of a secret satellite (reportedly) worth $3.5 billion:

In early January, SpaceX adamantly denied rumors that it had botched the launch of a classified spy satellite called Zuma, and now, a new government probe has absolved the company of blame for the spacecraft's loss. Government investigators looking into the mission determined that a structure on top of the rocket, called the payload adapter, failed to deploy the satellite into orbit, The Wall Street Journal reports. That adapter was built by defense contractor Northrop Grumman, which means SpaceX isn't at fault for Zuma's demise.

This scenario aligns with what many speculated at the time. SpaceX launched Zuma on top of its Falcon 9 rocket on January 7th, and just a day later, reports started to surface that the satellite had fallen back to Earth and burned up in the atmosphere after the mission. However, SpaceX president Gwynne Shotwell claimed that the rocket performed as it was supposed to. "For clarity: after review of all data to date, Falcon 9 did everything correctly on Sunday night," she said in a statement. "If we or others find otherwise based on further review, we will report it immediately. Information published that is contrary to this statement is categorically false."

[...] Meanwhile, the payload adapter failure isn't a good look for Northrop Grumman, which is having a difficult time piecing together another important spacecraft right now: NASA's James Webb Space Telescope. Northrop is the main contractor of the telescope and is currently integrating large pieces of the spacecraft at the company's facilities in Redondo Beach, California. However, NASA recently announced that James Webb's launch will have to be delayed until 2020, due to a number of mistakes and delays that were made at Northrop during the construction process.

SpaceX should demand to use its own payload adapters for any new classified/national security launches, because it will probably be granted in light of this "Beltway bandit" fiasco.

Also at CNBC and LA Times.

Previously:...

15:03

FBI Raids Offices, Home of Trumps Personal Lawyer cryptogon.com

Via: Reuters: The Federal Bureau of Investigation on Monday raided the offices and home of U.S. President Donald Trumps personal lawyer Michael Cohen, law enforcement sources said, in a dramatic new development in a series of probes involving close Trump associates. Cohens lawyer, Stephen M. Ryan, said that U.S. prosecutors conducted a search that was []

15:00

Beautiful Pi-Powered Cocktail Machine Hackaday

Science fiction has long had the idea that a good drink should just appear from a sliding panel in a wall. Bartending is to be the preserve of robots and AIs manual control is for the past, and in an effort to continue our progress to towards that sci-fi future, Reddit user [HighwingZ] has built a beautiful machine that mixes and serves drinks.

Instead of a sliding wall panel, [HighwingZ] has built a hexagonal container. Five of the six sides contain bottles to fill the drink with, the last panel contains the spigot and a spot for the glass. The machine works by weighing the liquid that gets poured into the glass using a load cell connected to a HX711 load cell amplifier. An aquarium pump is used to push air into whichever bottle has been selected via some magnetic valves which forces the liquid up its tube and into the glass. A simple touch screen UI is used so the user can select which drink and how much of it gets poured. All of this is connected to a Raspberry Pi to control it all.

The whole thing is built into a great looking wooden showcase with see-through sides, so you can see the bottles to be used to make the drinks. [HighwingZ] put the Python code that controls everything on github for anyone wanting to make their own. There are a few cocktail making hacks on the site, like...

14:51

Police Chief Wants Citizens to Bring 'Net Oligarchs to Heel SoylentNews

One of England's top police officers, Shaun Sawyer, wants citizens to go after internet giants that have wronged them.

Sawyer, who is chief constable in Devon and Cornwall and is national lead for human trafficking and modern slavery, made the suggestion in an interview with The Sunday Times, published over the weekend.

In a paywalled article, he told the Murdoch organ that if someone is a victim of an Internet-enabled crime, they should sue the platform involved.

Describing the internet as a safe space for organised crime, he said Silicon Valley company abuses were becoming a human injustice.

The comments coincidentally (?) came after American authorities last week shuttered Backpage.com, a site accused of supporting human trafficking by allowing publication of advertisements for "escorts".

Sawyer believes platforms like Facebook need more policing, and he also criticised liberal laws.

So it's down to users, apparently: if people with the resources of the person in the street start suing the platforms, he argued, they would start using their resources to spot abuse.


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13:19

Mechanism Vital to Keeping Blood Stem Cells Functional Uncovered SoylentNews

Hematopoietic stem cells, that form mature blood cells, require a very precise amount of protein to function -- and defective regulation of protein production is common in certain types of aggressive human blood cancers. Now, a research team at Lund University in Sweden has uncovered a completely new mechanism that controls how proteins are produced to direct stem cell function.

"Our research is potentially important for life-threatening blood cancers characterised by dysfunctional stem cells -- which are common in elderly people. High protein synthesis levels could represent an Achilles' heel to eradicating cancer-initiating cells," explains Cristian Bellodi, research team leader at Lund University's Department of Laboratory Medicine.

Dr. Bellodi's laboratory uncovered a new important function of pseudouridine, the most common type of RNA modification in human cells.

[...] The team's key discovery was that stem cells lacking an enzyme responsible for pseudouridine modification of RNA, known as PUS7, produce abnormal amounts of protein. This protein overload leads to unbalanced stem cell growth and dramatically blocks differentiation to blood cells.

They uncovered that the PUS7 enzyme is capable of introducing a pseudouridine modification into previously uncharacterized, non-coding-protein RNA molecules that they denoted as miniTOGs (mTOGs). The presence of pseudouridine "activates" mTOGs to strongly suppress the stem cell protein synthesis machinery. This ensures that the correct amount of proteins is made.

"Our work illustrates that this exquisite control mechanism -- regulated by PUS7 and pseudouridine -- is critical to adjusting the amount of proteins needed for human stem cells to grow and produce blood," says Cristian Bellodi.

Since pseudouridine modifications may affect various RNA molecules in different types of normal and malignant cells, "our discoveries pave the way for future avenues of research aimed at exploring the role of pseudouridine in human development disease," concludes Cristian Bellodi.


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13:06

Zoltan Istvan Adventurer, Futurist, Politician Lifeboat News: The Blog

#Chicago friends, Im honored to be speaking at the University of Chicago via the Chicago Society on Thursday, April 19, at 6PM CDT, Cobb 106. The Chicago Society has hosted speakers like Bill Gates, former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, Nobel Laureate Gary Becker, and former Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson, Join me for a free talk and Q & Aand ask me all questions about #transhumanism and our coming wild tech future!

13:05

New device modulates light and amplifies tiny signals Lifeboat News: The Blog

Imagine a single particle, only one-tenth the diameter of a bacterium, whose miniscule jiggles induce sustained vibrations in an entire mechanical device some 50 times larger. By taking clever advantage of the interplay between light, electrons on the surface of metals, and heat, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have for the first time created a plasmomechanical oscillator (PMO), so named because it tightly couples plasmonsthe collective oscillations of electrons at the surface of a metal nanoparticleto the mechanical vibrations of the much larger device its embedded in.

The entire system, no bigger than a , has myriad technological applications. It offers new ways to miniaturize mechanical oscillators, improve communication systems that depend on the modulation of , dramatically amplify extremely weak mechanical and electrical signals and create exquisitely sensitive sensors for the tiny motions of nanoparticles.

NIST researchers Brian Roxworthy and Vladimir Aksyuk described their work in a recent issue of Optica.

12:52

Theres a Lot of Sperm on the International Space Station Right Now Lifeboat News: The Blog

Sperm in space!!!


For the first time (officially), NASA will set loose some human sperm in outer space.

12:37

What 40 Years of Research Reveals About the Difference Between Disruptive and Radical Innovation Lifeboat News: The Blog

If you went to bed last night as an industrial company, youre going to wake up this morning as a software and analytics company. Jeff Immelt, former CEO of General Electric

The second wave of digitization is set to disrupt all spheres of economic life. As venture capital investor Marc Andreesen pointed out, software is eating the world. Yet, despite the unprecedented scope and momentum of digitization, many decision makers remain unsure how to cope, and turn to scholars for guidance on how to approach disruption.

The first thing they should know is that not all technological change is disruptive. Its important to distinguish between different types of innovation, and the responses they require by firms. In a recent publication in the Journal of Product Innovation, we undertook a systematic review of 40 years (1975 to 2016) of innovation research. Using a natural language processing approach, we analyzed and organized 1,078 articles published on the topics of disruptive, architectural, breakthrough, competence-destroying, discontinuous, and radical innovation. We used a topic-modeling algorithm that attempts to determine the topics in a set of text documents. We quantitatively compared different models, which led us to select the model that best described the underlying text data. This model clustered text into 84 distinct topics. It performs best at explaining the variability of the data in assigning words to topics and topics to documents, minimizing noise in the data.

12:00

Social Networking Robot Actually Respects Privacy Hackaday

[Fribo] the robot is a research project in the form of an adorable unit that hears and speaks, but doesnt move. Moving isnt necessary for it to do its job, which is helping people who live alone feel more connected with their friends. Whats more interesting (and we daresay, unusual) is that it does this in a way that respects and maintains individuals feelings of privacy. To be a sort of social connector and trigger between friends where every interaction is optional and opt-in was the design intent behind [Fribo].

The device works by passively monitoring ones home and understands things like the difference between opening the fridge and opening the front door; it can recognize speech but cannot record and explicitly does not have a memory of your activities. Whenever the robot hears something it recognizes, it will notify other units in a circle of friends. For example, [Fribo] may suddenly say Oh, one of your friends just opened their refrigerator. I wonder what food they are going to have? People know someone did something, but not who. From there, there are two entirely optional ways to interact further: knocking indicates curiosity, clapping indicates empathy, and doing either reveals your identity to the originator. All this can serve as an opportunity to connect in some way, or it can just help people feel more connected to others. The whole thing is best explained by the video embedded below, which shows several use cases.

In this day and age of treating people like data to be intrusively mined, its downright charming for a projects vision to be something as simple and wholesome as being a reminder that there are others out there, sharing everyday activities. Of course, on the opposite end of [Fribo]s minimalist visage is this robot that communicates entirely with animated gifs.

[Fribo] is a project by [Kwangmin Jeong], [Jihyun Sung], [Haesung Lee], [Aram Kim], [Hyem Kim], [Chanmi Park], [Youin Jeong], [JeeHang Lee], and [Jinwoo Kim] from Yonsei University in Korea.

11:47

Linux Beep Bug Joke Backfires As Branded Fix Falls Short SoylentNews

One of the silliest bugs on record emerged late last week, when Debian project leader Chris Lamb took to the distro's security to post an advisory that the little [beep] utility had a local privilege escalation vulnerability.

The utility lets either a command line user control a PC's speaker, or more usefully a program can pipe the command out to the command line to tell the user something's happened. If, of course, their machines still have a beeper-speaker, which is increasingly rare and raises the question why the utility still exists. Since beep isn't even installed by default, it's not hard to see the issue would have gone un-noticed.

News of the bug emerged at holeybeep.ninja/, a site that combines news of the bug with attempts at satirising those who brand bugs and put up websites about them.

But the joke's on holeybeep.ninja because according to the discussion at the Debian mailing list, the fix the site provided didn't fix all of beep's problems. As Tony Hoyle wrote: The patch vulnerability seems more severe to me, as people apply patches all the time (they shouldn't do it as root, but people are people) It's concerning that the holeybeep.ninja site exploited an unrelated fault for 'fun' without apparently telling anyone.

German security researcher and journalist Hanno Bck alerted the OSS-sec list to further issues on Sunday.

[...] Bck's note also linked to an integer overflow and a bug in the patch supposed to fix the original issue.

As a result, Bck wrote, beep should probably be discarded: it needs a proper code review, and there's no much point to the effort for a tool talking to the PC speaker, which doesn't exist in most modern systems anyway.


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11:44

The new battery that may be vital for a zero carbon future Lifeboat News: The Blog

Researchers have made a potentially vital breakthrough in the search for renewable energy storage.

11:43

This new app will help you identify the plants and animals you see in nature Lifeboat News: The Blog

Seek will also tell you which species you are most likely to see in your area, based on wildlife observations recorded and uploaded to iNaturalist. You will be given maps and charts to help you track down nearby flora and fauna but if you prefer to explore on your own, Seek is happy to tell you about any random plant or insect that catches your eye.

INaturalist encourages all users to take photos of everything they see even if its not on the list to develop the AIs ability to recognize wildlife. As co-founder Scott Loarie told My Modern Met, The only way we can improve our modeling of species is to get more data, and to do that we need more people outside taking pictures.

Seek is currently available on the App Store and is in beta testing for Android.

11:43

Alzheimers gene neutralised in human brain cells for the first time Lifeboat News: The Blog

S cientists have claimed an important breakthrough in the battle against Alzheimers after neutralising the most significant gene responsible for the disease for the first time.

A team in California successfully identified the protein associated with the high-risk apoE4 gene and then manage to prevent it damaging human neuron cells.

The study could open the door to a potential new drug capable of halting the disease, however the researchers have urged caution because so far their compound has only been tried on collections of cells in a laboratory.

11:43

The U.S. governments high tech Holy Grail Lifeboat News: The Blog

Investors are sounding the alarm after a little-known U.S. government agency green lit what could be the next trillion-dollar technology.

This tight-lipped agency, known as DARPA, has a history of developing some of the most transformative technologies known to man. But what many dont realize is that it can PAY to follow DARPAs biggest projects.

In fact, one DARPA-funded venture was a computer network designed to provide interconnectivity among users we now call this network the internet.

11:43

Elon Musk shows off SpaceX BFR spaceship tool (and its huge) Lifeboat News: The Blog

SpaceXs CEO feeds the hype for a new rocket with a photo showing a gigantic tool that will be used as a mold to create the spaceships body.

11:42

Heres What Will Happen After a Huge Earthquake Inevitably Hits California Lifeboat News: The Blog

Nobody knows when The Big One is going to hit California, but heres how experts think it will play out when it does.

11:42

Military-Funded Study Successfully Tests Prosthetic Memory Brain Implants Lifeboat News: The Blog

Scientists tested a brain implant that replicates short-term recall in patients with memory loss. It may have actually worked.

10:53

Five things to watch in Zuckerberg's testimony The Hill: Technology Policy

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will feel the glare of the national spotlight on Tuesday as he testifies to Congress for the first time.Lawmakers are demanding answers about how Cambridge Analytica, a British data firm hired by the Trump campaign, was...

10:52

Overnight Tech: High-stakes test for Zuckerberg | Intends to apologize to Congress | Facebook pushed to expand new EU privacy rules | Feds indict Backpage execs The Hill: Technology Policy

Zuckerberg enters the lion's den: It's a big week for Mark Zuckerberg who is facing the toughest political test of his career. The stakes are high as he testifies before the House and Senate this week over the Cambridge Analytica data scandal and...

10:30

Linux 4.17 Change To Allow RTCs To Live Beyond Their Intended Life Phoronix

The "real-time clock" (RTC) changes usually aren't too notable to the Linux kernel merge windows, but for the in-development Linux 4.17 kernel to prolong their life for decades to come, at least as far as the clock is concerned...

10:14

Greener and Cheaper Technique for Biofuel Production SoylentNews

A team of engineers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) recently discovered that a naturally occurring bacterium, Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum TG57, isolated from waste generated after harvesting mushrooms, is capable of directly converting cellulose, a plant-based material, to biobutanol.

A research team led by Associate Professor He Jianzhong from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at NUS Faculty of Engineering first discovered the novel TG57 strain in 2015. They went on to culture the strain to examine its properties.

Assoc Prof He explained, "The production of biofuels using non-food feedstocks can improve sustainability and reduce costs greatly. In our study, we demonstrated a novel method of directly converting cellulose to biobutanol using the novel TG57 strain. This is a major breakthrough in metabolic engineering and exhibits a foundational milestone in sustainable and cost-effective production of renewable biofuels and chemicals."

[...] Moving forward, the research team will continue to optimise the performance of the TG57 strain, and further engineer it to enhance biobutanol ratio and yield using molecular genetic tools.

The team published the findings of the study in the scientific journal Science Advances on 23 March 2018.


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10:00

HPR2527: Reviews Vs. Critiques Hacker Public Radio

Lostnbronx takes a quick look at what it is that constitutes &quot;reviews&quot; of stories (be they books, films, TV shows, audio dramas, whatever) as opposed to &quot;critiques&quot; of them. How do these two things differ, and what are their purposes? Is one more important than the other? Why does it even matter?

09:55

09:31

KDE Connect 1.3 Gets An Extension For GNOME's Nautilus Phoronix

KDE Connect is the nifty KDE project providing allowing communication between your Linux desktop computer and your Android smartphone/tablet via a secure communication protocol. KDE Connect 1.3 is now the latest feature release...

09:00

Who Made the First Human Audio Recordings? Edison? Not so Fast! Hackaday

You probably learned in school that Thomas Edison was the first human voice recorded, reciting Mary Had a Little Lamb. As it turns out though, thats not strictly true. Edison might have been the first person to play his voice back, but he wasnt the first to deliberately record. That honor goes to a French inventor named douard-Lon Scott de Martinville. He wanted to study sound and created the phonautograph a device which visualized sound on soot-covered paper. They were not made to be played back, but the information is there. These recordings were made around 1860. Theres a 9-part video series about how the recordings were made and more interestingly how they were played back using modern technology. Part 1 appears below.

We say around 1860 because there were some early recordings starting around 1857 that havent been recovered. Eventually, the recordings would have a tuning fork sound which allows modern playback since the known signal can estimate the speed of the hand-cranked cylinder. The date of the first recovered recording was today, April 9th, 158 years ago.

The really interesting part is how they found some actual recordings with the original patent and then tracked down even more stored in archives. It is amazing that soot-covered paper has survived all these years. The website has a description of two different methods used to scan and playback the primitive recordings. You can also hear the recovered audio, of course.

Weve heard rumblings no pun intended that audio might be accidentally recorded in pottery or other old artifacts. However, we havent seen any credible recovery of sound using these methods, including an attempt by MythBusters.

The phonautograph was a precursor to the phonograph, and we wonder if Edison was aware of it. It is interesting to think of the progression of audio recording media. Sooty paper, tinfoil, wax, vinyl, and even wire have held recordings. Of course, tape, plastic, and now whatever can hold digital data also do the job today.

...

08:38

The Evolutionary Advantage of Having Eyebrows SoylentNews

Submitted via IRC for AndyTheAbsurd

Having movable eyebrows and evolving beyond the Neanderthal ridge may have played a crucial role in early human survival.

Eyebrows, we all have them, but what are they actually for? While eyebrows help to prevent debris, sweat, and water from falling into the eye socket, they serve another important function too and it's all to do with how they move and human connection.

[...] But our latest research may have found an answer to explain why archaic humans had such a pronounced wedge of bone over their eyes (and why modern humans don't). And it seems to be down to the fact that our highly movable eyebrows can be used to express a wide range of subtle emotions which could have played a crucial role in human survival.

Research has already shown that humans today unconsciously raise their eyebrows briefly when they see someone at a distance to show we are not a threat. And we also lift our eyebrows to show sympathy with others a tendency noticed by Darwin in the 19th century.

[...] The brow ridges in archaic humans also serve no obvious function in relation to chewing or other practical mechanics a theory commonly put forward to explain protruding brow ridges. As when the ridge was taken away there was no effect on the rest of the face when biting. This means that brow ridges in archaic humans must have had a social function most likely used to display social dominance as is seen in other primates.

For our species losing the brow ridge probably meant looking less intimidating, but by developing flatter and more vertical foreheads our species could do something very unusual move our eyebrows in all kinds of subtle and important ways.

Although the loss of the brow ridge may have initially been driven by changes in our brain or facial reduction, it subsequently allowed our eyebrows to make many different subtle and friendly gestures to people around us.

Source: https://theconversation.com/the-evolutionary-advantage-of-having-eyebrows-94599


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08:11

x86 Chinese CPU Manufacturer Zhaoxin Has Been Working On Linux Support Phoronix

Today's hardware monitoring subsystem updates sent into the Linux 4.17 kernel merge window were a bit peculiar with "new Centaur CPUs" now being supported for reading the CPU core temperatures...

08:11

Largest Black Lives Matter page on Facebook was a scam: report The Hill: Technology Policy

The largest pro-Black Lives Matter page on Facebook was actually a scam tied to a white man in Australia, CNN reported on Monday. The page had accrued 700,000 Facebook followers almost double the amount of the official Black Lives Matter...

07:07

New Blood Test Useful to Detect People at Risk of Developing Alzheimer's Disease SoylentNews

The researchers first focused on patients in the early, so called prodromal stages of the disease from the Swedish BioFINDER cohort conducted by Oskar Hanson. They found that the test reliably detected amyloid- alterations in the blood of participants with mild cognitive impairment that also showed abnormal amyloid deposits in brain scans.

In a next step, Gerwert and colleagues investigated if their assay was able to detect blood changes well ahead of disease onset. They used data from the ESTHER cohort study, which Hermann Brenner started in 2000 at DKFZ, comparing blood samples of 65 participants that were later in the follow-up studies diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease with 809 controls. The assay was able to detect signs of the disease on average eight years before diagnosis in individuals without clinical symptoms. It correctly identified those with the disease in almost 70% of the cases, while about 9% of true negative subjects would wrongly be detected as positive. The overall diagnostic accuracy was 86%.

[...] The blood test will be extended to Parkinson disease by measuring another disease biomarker -- alpha-synuclein -- instead of amyloid-.

Journal Reference: Andreas Nabers, Laura Perna, Julia Lange, Ute Mons, Jonas Schartner, Jrn Gldenhaupt, KaiUwe Saum, Shorena Janelidze, Bernd Holleczek, Dan Rujescu, Oskar Hansson, Klaus Gerwert, Hermann Brenner. Amyloid blood biomarker detects Alzheimer's disease. EMBO Molecular Medicine, 2018; e8763 DOI: 10.15252/emmm.201708763


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07:05

Feds charge Backpage execs with promoting prostitution, money laundering The Hill: Technology Policy

Federal prosecutors on Monday indicted executives for Backpage.com on a series of money laundering and prostitution charges.The 93-count indictment was unsealed days after authorities seized the classified ads site and reportedly raided the...

06:21

Vulkan CTS 1.1.1 Adds 26,272 New Test Cases Phoronix

The Vulkan CTS as the conformance test suite for ensuring drivers are properly and fully implementing the Vulkan graphics and compute API continues getting even more in-depth and attempts to cover as many corner-cases as possible...

06:00

3D-Printer Gets Hot-Swappable Hot-Ends Hackaday

3D printers can be hacked into a multitude of useful machines, simply by replacing the filament extruder with a new attachment such as a laser engraver or plotter.

However, [geggo] was fed up with re-wiring and mounting the printhead/tool every time he wanted to try something new, and set out to design a modular printhead system for next-level convenience. The result? A magnetic base-plate, allowing a 3D printer to become a laser engraver within a matter of seconds. This new base-plate mounts onto the existing ball bearings and provides a sturdy place for attachments to snap to with room for two at once.

Using neodymium magnets to mount the printhead to the base-plate provides enough force to keep the attachment in place and compress 30 pogo pins, which make the electrical connections. These carry the lines which are common to all attachments (heater, thermistor and fan), as well as custom connections for certain attachments for example the extruder stepper motors.  A Flexible Flat Cable (FFC) is used to connect the pogo pin PCB to the main controller.

So far, the list of tools available for fitting includes an MK8 extruder, a E3D v6 hotend (for Bowden extrusion), a laser, a micrometer dial indicator, and a pen plotter (used for writing a batch of wedding invitations!). There was even some success milling wood.

For some automated extruder switching action weve shown you in the past, check out the 3d-printer tool changer.

05:50

05:41

Leap Motion Releasing Specifications for a $100 Augmented Reality Headset SoylentNews

Leap Motion (not to be confused with Magic Leap) will release specifications for a $100 augmented reality headset:

Gesture interface company Leap Motion is announcing an ambitious, but still very early, plan for an augmented reality platform based on its hand tracking system. The system is called Project North Star, and it includes a design for a headset that Leap Motion claims costs less than $100 at large-scale production. The headset would be equipped with a Leap Motion sensor, so users could precisely manipulate objects with their hands something the company has previously offered for desktop and VR displays.

[...] While Leap Motion is citing an impressive price and field of view, Project North Star isn't (as far as we can see) meant to one-up headsets like HoloLens and Magic Leap. It's supposed to offer great hand interactions, but not advanced room-scale tracking, interaction with your environment, or a self-contained design. The design could be helpful for small players that want to experiment with augmented reality hardware, while requiring relatively little investment from Leap Motion itself.

Also at VentureBeat.


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05:33

Roku Bans Popular Social IPTV Linking Service cCloud TV TorrentFreak

Despite being one of the more popular set-top box platforms, until last year Roku managed to stay completely out of the piracy conversation.

However, due to abuse of its system by third-parties, last June the Superior Court of Justice of the City of Mexico banned the importation and distribution of Roku devices in the country.

The decision followed a complaint filed by cable TV provider Cablevision, which said that some Roku channels and their users were infringing its distribution rights.

Since then, Roku has been fighting to have the ban lifted, previously informing TF that it expressly prohibits copyright infringement of any kind. That led to several more legal processes yet last month and after considerable effort, the ban was upheld, much to Rokus disappointment.

It is necessary for Roku to make adjustments to its software, as other online content distribution platforms do, so that violations of copyrighted content do not take place, Cablevision said.

Then, at the end of March, Roku suddenly banned the USTVnow channel from its platform, citing a third-party copyright complaint.

In a series of emails with TF, the company declined to offer further details but there is plenty of online speculation that the decision was a move towards the adjustments demanded by Cablevision. Today yet more fuel is being poured onto that same fire with Rokus decision to ban the popular cCloud TV service from its platform.

For those unfamiliar with cCloud TV, its a video streaming platform that relies on users to contribute media links found on the web, whether theyre movie and TV shows or live sporting events.

Project cCloud TV is known as the Popcorn Time for Live TV. The project started with 50 channels and has grown over time and now has over 4000 channels from all around the world, its founder Bane told TF back in 2016.

The project was inspired by Popcorn Time and its simplicity for streaming torrents. The service works based on media links that can be found anywhere on the web and the cCloud project makes it easier for users to stream.

Aside from the vast array of content cCloud offers, its versatilit...

04:47

12 Common Threat Intelligence Use Cases Graham Cluley

12 Common Threat Intelligence Use Cases

Graham Cluley Security News is sponsored this week by the folks at Recorded Future. Thanks to the great team there for their support!

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04:39

Re: Re: Terminal Control Chars Open Source Security

Posted by Not Real on Apr 09

This is posted here every few months. Frankly, there's a lackluster care in
fixing this in these terminals.
For terminals, here's a decent avenue (gnome-terminal as example):

https://turbochaos.blogspot.com/2014/08/journalctl-terminal-escape-injection.html

04:30

A Victrola For The 21st century Hackaday

Under the hood is an Arduino-controlled MP3 player, while on the surface is a 3D-printed turntable and horn. On the turntable is placed a CD, and a lead screw moves the horn across it during play to simulate the effect of a real turntable. An Arduino motor controller shield drives the turntable and lead screw, and at the end of each song, the horn is automatically returned to the start of the CD as if it were a record.

The effect is purely aesthetic but should make for an unusual talking point if nothing else. Surprisingly this project is not the first of its type, in the past, weve shown you another one that played a real CD in the place of the record on the turntable.

The HackadayPrize2018 is Sponsored by:

04:29

Wayland 1.15 & Weston 4.0 Officially Released Phoronix

Today marks the long-awaited debut of Wayland 1.15 and the Weston 4.0 reference compositor...

04:12

Microsoft Modifies Open-Source Code, Blows Hole in Windows Defender SoylentNews

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/04/04/microsoft_windows_defender_rar_bug/

A remote-code execution vulnerability in Windows Defender a flaw that can be exploited by malicious .rar files to run malware on PCs has been traced back to an open-source archiving tool Microsoft adopted for its own use.


Original Submission

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04:09

California: SB-1424 Internet: Social Media: False Information: Strategic Plan cryptogon.com

Via: Jon Rappoport: This bill would require any person who operates a social media, as defined, Internet Web site with a physical presence in California to develop a strategic plan to verify news stories shared on its Web site. The bill would require the plan to include, among other things, a plan to mitigate the []

03:58

Two Latest Cyber Security Threats & How To Protect Against Them HackRead

By Ryan De Souza

Cyber security is undoubtedly the backbone of any online businesses

This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: Two Latest Cyber Security Threats & How To Protect Against Them

03:48

Facebook shut down accounts linked to Russian intelligence in summer 2016 The Hill: Technology Policy

Facebook shut down accounts linked to hackers widely believed to be operating on the Russian government's behalf before the 2016 presidential election, CEO Mark Zuckerberg plans to tell Congress this week.In summer 2016, Facebook identified accounts...

03:47

Kudlow: Zuckerberg should stop wearing 'hoodies and dungarees' The Hill: Technology Policy

President Trump's chief economic adviser, Larry Kudlow, offered Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg fashion advice ahead of his upcoming Capitol Hill testimony this week, saying he should stop wearing "hoodies and dungarees.""Is he going...

03:28

AMD Posts VP9 VA-API Video Acceleration For Gallium3D Phoronix

Hitting the Mesa mailing list today from AMD developers are a set of twenty-two patches providing VP9 video acceleration support via the Gallium3D VA-API state tracker...

02:07

Zuckerberg to apologize in front of Congress The Hill: Technology Policy

Mark Zuckerberg will apologize to Congress this week for the data leak that resulted in a political contractor improperly obtaining information on 87 million Facebook users.In prepared testimony released by the House Energy and Commerce Committee on...

01:43

Read Mark Zuckerberg's prepared testimony to House panel The Hill: Technology Policy

The House Energy and Commerce Committee on Monday released prepared testimony from Mark Zuckerberg ahead of an appearance by the Facebook chief executive on Capitol Hill later this week. The hearing comes amid fallout from revelations that the...

00:56

Consumer groups urge Facebook to extend European privacy protections globally The Hill: Technology Policy

A coalition of consumer groups is calling on Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg to extend new privacy controls that will be required by a new European law next month to all users of the social media platform worldwide.Trans Atlantic Consumer Dialogue,...

00:49

Facebook launches project to study social medias impact on elections The Hill: Technology Policy

Facebook announced Monday that it will establish an independent research commission to study social medias impact on elections and democracy. The announcement comes as the social media giant receives heightened scrutiny for its policies and...

Monday, 09 April

22:30

Child advocates, consumer groups asking FTC to investigate YouTube The Hill: Technology Policy

Consumer organizations and advocates for children are filing a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), accusing Google of violating kids digital privacy through YouTube, The Associated Press reported Monday.The complaint will reportedly...

21:51

Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak shutting down Facebook account The Hill: Technology Policy

Steve Wozniak, a co-founder of Apple, is closing down his Facebook account amid the ongoing privacy scandal facing the social media giant."Users provide every detail of their life to Facebook and ... Facebook makes a lot of advertising money off...

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