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Saturday, 26 August

22:53

Menominee Tribe Requests Government to Government Consultation with the EPA and Army Corps on the Back Forty Mine Project Native News Online

Published August 26, 2017

KESHENA, WISCONSIN In  continuation to fight the proposed Back 40 Forty Mine project, the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin is exercising its sovereign rights by formally requesting government to government consultation with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) on the wetland permit required under the Clean Water Act. As part of the consultation the Tribe is requesting the EPA and USACE to make a specific jurisdictional determination for the Menominee River, in Michigans Upper Penisular, before moving forward with any wetland permit for the project

Gary Besaw, tribal chairman of the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin. Native News Online photo by Levi Rickert

The Tribe is aware that the Clean Water Act prohibits the United States from delegating wetland permitting authority to the State of Michigan in regard to certain waters of the United States. We believe there is sufficient evidence to demonstrate the waters at issue in the proposed Back 40 mine project are waters that cannot be delegated to the State of Michigan. In non-delegable waters, the proper permitting authority for the wetland permit is the US Army Corps, not Michigan stated Menominee Tribal Chairman Gary Besaw.

Aquila Resources, Inc., a Canadian development stage company, has been granted three of the four permits required for the project. The companys efforts to obtain the fourth and most difficult permit, a wetland permit, have been unsuccessful to date. Aquilas was forced to withdraw their first wetland permit application in 2016 and their second application submitted...

16:36

Johnny Cash vs. the Klan | Georgia Straight Vancouver's News & Entertainment Weekly Aboriginal News Group Newswire

Johnny Cash vs. the Klan | Georgia Straight Vancouver's News & Entertainment Weekly: So it wasnt much of a surprise when footage of the far-right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, on August 12 showed one cretin ignorant enough to show up wearing a Johnny Cash T-shirt. Hed likely assumed that Cash, an Arkansas-born country-music star whose career began back in the days of segregation, represented some sort of kindred spirit.

But if thats what he was thinking (and he almost certainly wasracists are notoriously fussy about rally wear), he was wrong. Holy shit, was he wrong.

An August 16 Facebook post, written by Cashs children to call out this distorted human, was among the most forceful condemnations of the horrors in Charlottesville, at a time when the U.S. president was fine with dismissing it all as a regrettable scuffle between law-abiding history buffs and the alt-left thug-elites who hate them.

16:35

WWI: A People's History of the First Global Imperialist War | Multimedia | teleSUR English Aboriginal News Group Newswire

WWI: A People's History of the First Global Imperialist War | Multimedia | teleSUR English: While the First World War is often depicted as a primarily European war, the conflict was truly global in scope, exacting a high price tag not only on combatants and working-class civilians in Europe and North America but on colonized and oppressed peoples throughout Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. The war can accurately be described as the first global conflict where the belligerents were, by and large, capitalist powers fighting for purely economic interests.

Breaking out in 1914, the war was rooted in the competition of major corporations and national industries for new sources of raw materials and the attempts to re-carve the global geopolitical balance in their favor. While each of the major states cynically claimed to fight for "freedom and civilization" or, in the case of the Allies, the need to confront "German militarism" all of the powers sought to gain the upper-hand on one another in terms of economic advantage, seized colonies, and the subjugation of native populations.

However, the war resulted in a loss of nearly 40 million lives and the destruction of several major population centers, making it the bloodiest war Europe had ever seen up to that point. By 1918, several monarchies and empires had collapsed among them those of Germany, Russia, Austria-Hungary, and the Ottoman Empire. The lasting effects of the war resulted in socialist and anti-colonial revolutions in poor regions across the globe, with the tip of the spear provided by the October 1917 Socialist Revolution in Russia which ushered in the creation of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, or USSR.

The period following World War I was marked by numerous conflicts, truces, revolutions, intractable feuds and aspirations toward regional hegemony and global empire, which ultimately resulted in the Second World War.

teleSUR takes a look at the lesser-explored aspect of WWI the colonized troops, the civilian victims, and the revolutionaries those who fought for their own freedom rather than for the profits of industrialists and the rich who benefited from the so-called "Great War."

16:03

Gendarmera argentina admite acciones contra Mapuches | Noticias | teleSUR Aboriginal News Group Newswire

Gendarmera argentina admite acciones contra Mapuches | Noticias | teleSUR - El jefe de la divisin 14 de la Gendarmera Nacional Argentina (GNA), comandante Mayor Diego Conrado Hctor Balari, asegur que tras realizar una reunin con el ministerio de seguridad "recib la orden de la superioridad institucional de hacerme cargo y coordinar las acciones para el operativo" en la provincia del Chubut, contra las protestas Mapuche donde desapareci el joven Santiago Maldonado.

Asimismo, afirm que "el operativo se arm en base a los hechos que sucedieron y en bases a orientaciones y rdenes precisas de emanadas por el ministerio de seguridad".

16:00

ACLU Comment on Trump Pardon of Joe Arpaio | American Civil Liberties Union Aboriginal News Group Newswire

ACLU Comment on Trump Pardon of Joe Arpaio | American Civil Liberties Union: NEW YORK President Trump has pardoned former Sheriff Joe Arpaio of Maricopa County, Arizona, who was found guilty of criminal contempt for deliberately violating a federal court order that prohibited illegal detentions based only on suspicions about immigration status.

The ruling stems from an initial lawsuit brought by Latino residents of Maricopa who successfully challenged Arpaios policies of racial profiling and illegal detentions. The plaintiff class was represented by the American Civil Liberties Union and partner organizations. Arpaio repeatedly flouted court orders in that civil rights case, leading to both civil and criminal contempt rulings against him.

15:11

Gresham, OR: Solidarity March with Charlottesville Harassed by Proud Boys - It's Going Down Aboriginal News Group Newswire

Gresham, OR: Solidarity March with Charlottesville Harassed by Proud Boys - It's Going Down: We stand in solidarity today with Charlottesville, VA from Gresham, OR! After we heard about the events that took place in Charlottesville two weeks ago we wanted to show our support for the victims and Heather Heyer. What made us organize this solidarity event also had to do with small similarities that crossed paths, because our community had been affected by a terrible incident last year.

We wanted to send a message to any fascists living in our community to get out and say theyre not welcome here. Last year on this same month outside a 7-Eleven store an African-American youth by the name of Larnell Bruce was confronted by a white supremacist couple from the European Kindred prison-gang outside the store parking lot. That white supremacists name is Russell Courtier who confronted Larnell Bruce and his girlfriend Colleen Hunt who was also involved with encouraging Courtier to attack Larnell Bruce.

14:33

Columbus Statue Doused with Red Paint in Buffalo; Petition Given to Mayor to Have Statue Removed Native News Online

Doused with red paint, Columbus statue was attacked in Buffalo. Photo from Buffalo Police Departments Facebook page.

Published August 26, 2017

BUFFALO Buffalo Police Department posted a photo of Christopher Columbus statute doused with red paint on Friday on its Facebook page. Along with the photograph with Columbus with red paint on his legs and paint on the stone foundation, the department posted the following message:

Sometime overnight, this statue was vandalized in Columbus Park on the Citys west side. Anyone with information on who may be responsible is asked to call or text the confidential tip line at 716 847-2255.

It was the second time in the past week that objects honoring Columbus in public places have been under attack. Earlier this week, in Baltimore, a monument was defaced with a sledge hammer. The defacing was recorded and posted online.

Earlier on Thursday, a petition with more than 700 signatures was turned in to Buffalos mayor to have the statue removed from the park and have Columbus Park, where the statue is located, renamed. The petition cites the movement across America to have Confederate statues removed.

Columbus did not discover anything the Americas were inhabited by a great diversity of people and cultures, the petition reads. Instead, Columbus established the beachhead for ruthless conquest and settler colonialism and inaugurated the genocidal devastation of whole continents.

The American Indian Movement has long sought to eliminate the observance of Columbus Day. Here is language from a press released distributed by the American Indian Movement in October 2000:

COLUMBUS WAS THE BEGINNING OF THE AMERICAN HOLOCAUST, ETHNIC CLEANSING CHARACTERIZED BY MURDER, TORTURE, RAPING, PILLAGING, ROBBERY, SLAVERY, KIDNAPPING, AND FORCED REMOVALS OF INDIAN PEOPLE FROM THEIR HOMELANDS.

 

 

 

The post Columbus Statue Doused with Red Paint in Buffalo; Petition Given to Mayor to Have Statue Removed appe...

14:32

Osage Nation Museum & Osage Nation Prevention Program to Host Second Outdoor Movie Night Native News Online

Published August 26, 2017

PAWHUSKA, OKLAHOMA  The Osage Nation Museum (ONM) and the Osage Nation Prevention Program (ONPP) are pleased to host the second in a series of four outdoor fun nights. A Night at the Museum: Outdoor Movie Series will continue on Friday, September 1st beginning at sundown (8:00 PM 8:30 PM). The featured film is the Disneys, The Jungle Book, a fun filled adventure that will entertain adults and children alike.

Outdoor movie events provide an opportunity for families and friends to enjoy the outdoors while watching movies on the big screen and learn about all that ONM has to offer. Every movie night is free and open to the public.

It is recommended that attendees bring blankets or lawn chairs for seating and arrive with plenty of time to park and get settled in prior to show time. Ah Tha Tse Catering will be on site selling concessions.  Free water will be provided courtesy of Osage Casinos and the Tulsa Akdar Shriners will be providing free popcorn. The series will be held at the ONM lawn located at 819 Grandview Avenue in Pawhuska, Okla.

Follow ONM on Facebook for reminders and to stay informed about more upcoming events and educational opportunities at ONM. Use the hashtag #weloveONM to post about events and information.

To learn more, please call or email Hallie Winter at 918/287-5441 or hwinter@osagenation-nsn.gov.

The post Osage Nation Museum & Osage Nation Prevention Program to Host Second Outdoor Movie Night appeared first on Native News Online.

14:32

Navajo Nation Looks to Tribal Colleges to Develop Tribal Workforces Native News Online

President Russell Begaye said tribal nations look to tribal institutions like SIPI to advance their technological workforces.

Published August 26, 2017

ALBUQUERQUE Navajo Naton President Russell Begaye told the staff at Southwestern Polytechnic Institute (SIPI) that they have an important task in developing a workforce of technical leaders for Native America.

The president spoke to the staff on Monday, Aug. 21, at the invitation of Dr. Sherry Allison, President of SIPI. More recently, President Begaye has joined the SIPI Board of Regents.

The Navajo Nation is exploring a new paradigm in developing advanced manufacturing, he said. We are looking to SIPI and other tribal colleges and universities to develop this workforce.

Advancements in technology call for research and production of materials to assist in building satellites, cell phones and renewable forms of energy. The potential for the Navajo Nation to be a part of this technological boom could be furthered through education and specified training.

For this technology to come from the Navajo Nation is amazing, President Begaye said. We need our education to evolve at a much higher level to train our students to be leaders in this developing industry.

In addition to the instructors, President Begaye tasked all Native American students with increasing their skillset to position their tribes to be technological leaders in emerging fields.

Our students are intelligent, theyre dreamers and innovators, he said. Theyre looking to gain knowledge. With many emerging fields of technology, we need SIPI to continue to expand and to train our people.

By fostering technological paradigms within our students and workforce, the Navajo Nation can change its economic and technical landscape said the president.

The post Navajo Nation Looks to Tribal Colleges to Develop Tribal Workforces appeared first on Native News Online.

13:45

NYC church, synagogue vandalized with white supremacist symbols | New York Post Aboriginal News Group Newswire

NYC church, synagogue vandalized with white supremacist symbols | New York Post: A swastika was found Thursday morning plastered onto the St. Paul and St. Andrew Methodist Church in the Upper West Side, according to police sources.

Later on Thursday, it was reported to police that the Beth Hachasidim DePolen in the Lower East Side synagogue was defaced with the letters KKK enclosed in circle and the word fu written underneath it, the sources said.

Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted Thursday that hate will not be tolerated in New York City, and encouraged anyone with information on the two incidents to contact the NYPD.

13:13

Action on First Nations youth inquest recommendations called disappointing | Toronto Star Aboriginal News Group Newswire

Action on First Nations youth inquest recommendations called disappointing | Toronto Star: The inquest investigated the deaths of seven First Nations youth, who died between 2000 and 2011.

The five-person jury determined the deaths of three students Curran Strang, Robyn Harper and Kyle Morrisseau were accidents.

The deaths of the remaining four students Jordan Wabasse, Kyle Morrisseau and Jethro Anderson, whose bodies were found in the waterways of Thunder Bay, and Paul Panacheese, who died in his mothers kitchen were undetermined.

All seven were between the ages of 15 and 21 when they died.

Racism has been an ongoing issue in the northeastern Ontario city, and there are still concerns about the safety of First Nations students.

The bodies of two more teens, Tammy Keeash and Josiah Begg, were found in Thunder Bay waterways in May. In July, 34-year-old Barbara Kentner died after she was hit with a trailer hitch while walking in Thunder Bay.

12:50

American-Indian boy banned from school for having long hair | New York Post Aboriginal News Group Newswire

American-Indian boy banned from school for having long hair | New York Post: My family is American-Indian. We are Cocopah Indian and that was the documentation that I was going to provide for the reason for my sons long hair, Oates explained. Its a signal of strength.

The principal contacted the mom and told her documentation isnt enough.

Apparently, the school board is a stickler for rules and cant think of any religions or cultures that would require long hair, Oates said.

Jabez went to school two days last weekonce with his long hair down and once with his hair in a bunand both styles were deemed inappropriate, the outlet said.

He was sent home because the black hair tie used to put his hair in a bun was considered an inappropriate hair accessory.

Oates is now seeking out day-care options and said she has received tons of backlash for trying to preserve his cultural identity.

12:47

This Red State's Voting Laws Are So Racist, Courts Ruled Against Them 4 Times in the Past 9 Days Aboriginal News Group Newswire

This Red State's Voting Laws Are So Racist, Courts Ruled Against Them 4 Times in the Past 9 Days: [reverbpress.com] What makes this case particularly noteworthy, aside from the fact that a red state was actually caught gerrymandering in a post-Shelby County v. Holder world, is that this is not the first time Texas has been discovered to have supported a form of voter suppression within the year. Nor is it the first time they have been caught within the month. No, in the span of 9 days alone, between August 15 and August 23, federal courts have found four instances of the Lone Star state actively trying to prevent minorities in their borders from exercising their right to vote.

12:22

Film adaptation of Richard Wagamese's novel Indian Horse to screen at VIFF 2017 | Georgia Straight Vancouver's News & Entertainment Weekly Aboriginal News Group Newswire

Film adaptation of Richard Wagamese's novel Indian Horse to screen at VIFF 2017 | Georgia Straight Vancouver's News & Entertainment Weekly: Elevation Pictures announced today (August 23) that the Ontario-shot film, directed by Stephen Campanelli (Momentum), will have its world premiere at the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival.

With a screenplay by Vancouver screenwriter Dennis Foon (On the Farm) and executive producers Roger Frappier and Clint Eastwood, the story follows the life of Saul Indian Horse, who was taken away from his Ojibwa family. After being placed in a Catholic residential school, he was not allowed to speak his language or denied his Indigenous heritage as he witnesses abuse. He finds escape in hockey, where his talent helps him escape the school, eventually even becoming a professional player. However, he struggles to deal with traumatic experiences of the past that continue to haunt him.

12:15

Trump order could give immigration agents a foothold in US schools | US news | The Guardian Aboriginal News Group Newswire

Trump order could give immigration agents a foothold in US schools | US news | The Guardian: Mark Keierleber

Tuesday 22 August 2017 06.00 EDT
Last modified on Tuesday 22 August 2017 09.53 EDT

One student exchanged hand gestures with a classmate in the school hallway. Another drew graffiti in his notebook. A third wore a Chicago Bulls T-shirt.

School authorities on Long Island, New York, accused the teenagers of displaying signs or symbols associated with a notorious street gang with close ties to Central America. They were suspended, and several of the students were arrested. But before the charges were substantiated even before appeals of their suspensions were complete the students were shipped off to detention facilities thousands of miles from home, without their parents knowledge.

11:57

Trump Pardons Disgraced Former Sheriff Joe Arpaio Native News Online

Joe Arpaio leaving court after his conviction in July 2017. NPR photo

Breaking News

Published August 24, 2017

WASHINGTON The White House announced tonight President Donald Trump pardoned former sheriff Joe Arpaio, who was convicted in July 2017 for intentionally disobeying a judges order in an immigration case.

With a hurricane soon to hit Texas, the White House made the announcement hours after Apaio was informed. The pardon comes as no suprise, since Trump hinted Arpaio had nothing to worry about while speaking at a campaign rally in downtown Phoenix this past Tuesday night.

So was Sheriff Joe was convicted for doing his job? Trump asked supporters. Ill make a prediction. I think hes going to be just fine, OK.

Arpaio, 85, the ex-sheriff of Arizonas Maricopa County, was to be sentenced in October 2017 for his conviction of a misdemeanor charge for intentionally defying a judges order to stop his traffic patrols that targeted immigrants. Arpaio defied the judges for 18 months.

Arpaios harsh treatment against American Indians, Hispanics and immigrants earned him the reputation as being the toughest sheriff in America. He was an avid supporter of Donald Trump.

He was defeated last November for the post of Maricopa County sheriff, a position he held since his election in 1992.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The post Trump Pardons Disgraced Former Sheriff Joe Arpaio appeared first on Native News Online.

10:41

Court imposes peace bond in Sinixt property dispute Warrior Publications

Sinixt Marilyn-James court

Sinixt elder Marilyn James at courthouse earlier this year.

Sinixt elder Marilyn James was charged with mischief and being unlawfully in a dwelling place

Bill Metcalfe, Nelson Star, August 25, 2017

Marilyn James is not allowed to go anywhere near Melissa Dorey or Angela Tuovinen for six months, according to the terms of a peace bond imposed in B.C. Provincial Court in Nelson by Judge Ronald Webb on Wednesday.

Judge Webb imposed the peace bond instead of sentencing the Slocan Valley resident and Sinixt elder for a charge of mischief, for which he found her guilty and then gave her an absolute discharge.

A peace bond is an order that a person not contact other specified person(s) and not commit an offence during a designated period.

James had also been charged with being unlawfully in a dwelling house, for which she was acquitted.

James represen...

10:08

Navajo Nation Leadership Meets with Congressman OHalleran to Discuss Critical Issues Native News Online

Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye with U.S. Congressman Tom OHalleran

Published August 25, 2017

TUBA CITY, ARIZONA To gain firsthand accounts of concerns in areas of specialized health care services, expanded and improved broadband coverage, and housing needs for health care staff, Congressman Tom OHalleran joined President Russell Begaye in touring two facilities in Tuba City on Tuesday, Aug. 15.

These visits are not part of a listening tour, said President Begaye. We set up the visits to establish communication between the facilities, departments, congressional representation and myself, so that we can address these issues at a higher level.

The congressman toured the Tuba City Regional Health Care Corporation (TCRHCC) and met with TCRHCC CEO Lynette Bonar who said the facilitys senior leadership is comprised of 70 percent Native Americans, primarily Navajo.

Bonar would like to see health care service improve throughout the community through health education.

We do more than just primary care, she said. We also do public health and environmental care.

The CEO said TCRHCC receives referrals from Hopi Health Care, Kayenta Health Center and the Chinle Comprehensive Health Care Facility. According to Bonar, if TCRHCC werent in place, a lot of patients would have to travel further south for health care.

The Flagstaff Medical Center cannot absorb the overflow of patients from the Navajo Nation, she said. If we didnt take the 140 patients referred, those patients would have gone south. We capture this funding. In 2015, TCRHCCC received 371 inpatient admission from these areas.

For TCRHCC, an Indian Health Service funding agreement covers 33 percent of their budget, third-party reimbursements cover 65 percent and grants make up the final two percent.

Bonar sees the need for fiber optic line to be put in to increase reliable intranet connections within the health care facility. Faster and more reliable intranet connection would contribute to improved efficiency, greater training opportunities and advancements in telemedicine.

Through Navajo Tribal Utility Authority this will cost $2 million dollars, she said.

The CEO advocated for a specialized treatment facility addressing onc...

09:57

Water issues drain Northland hapu's resources - NZ Herald Aboriginal News Group Newswire

Water issues drain Northland hapu's resources - NZ Herald: Zodiac Holdings has recently applied for consent from Whangarei District Council (WDC) to build a 3600sqm factory at the old bore site, previously owned by the council, across the road from the springs.

Zodiac, incorporating New Zealand Spring Water, said in its application it could mitigate issues such as the factory exceeding the council's size regime, limited vehicle parking, wastewater disposal and the extra traffic load on the road.

Zodiac has a Northland Regional Council (NRC) permit to take up to 150,000 litres a day to bottle water it will brand as Thunder Mountain and, according to its website, sell to domestic and Asian markets.

The plant would employ up to 20 workers, most at the Poroti site.

08:31

University of Illinois bans 'war chant' during sporting events - Chicago Tribune Aboriginal News Group Newswire

University of Illinois bans 'war chant' during sporting events - Chicago Tribune: Illinois has faced decades of criticism for its use of Native American imagery in sports.

The universitys board of trustees banned the Chief Illiniwek mascot in 2007, two years after an NCAA decision barring teams that use potentially offensive Native American imagery from hosting postseason play.

A group of former Chief portrayers and current students determined to maintain the tradition continue to wear a headdress, stereotypical Native American clothing and war paint on their faces at sporting events, although the university does not endorse this group.

Illinois said it has no plans to end the Three-in-One fight song that has been played since the early 1900s. When it is played at basketball games, some students cross their arms and bow their heads in another act of stereotypical Native American appropriation. Students also wear shirts, not sold by the university, that feature feathers or say, Bring back the Chief.

08:16

Repressive peace and investor security in #Myanmar / #Rohingya Aboriginal News Group Newswire

Repressive peace and investor security in Myanmar /  | Shahid Bolsen: The situation in Rakhine state is deteriorating rapidly and all signs indicate that a new pogrom against the Rohingya is imminent. United Nations fact-finding investigators have been banned from the country. The army has deployed heavy artillery, armored cars and helicopters, for clearance operations in Northern Rakhine, and there is speculation that Buddhist civilians will be organized into militias with arms and training by the military. Already in the Western township of Zay Di Pyin Rohingya have been blocked by Buddhist civilians from leaving the village. There is every reason to fear that ethnic cleansing operations this time around will be broader and more brutal than ever before.

08:13

Indianz.Com > Housing Secretary Ben Carson addresses tribal housing conference in Montana Aboriginal News Group Newswire

Indianz.Com > Housing Secretary Ben Carson addresses tribal housing conference in Montana: The Trump administration has not taken an official stance on the issue and news reports did not say whether Carson discussed it. When Heidi Frechette, the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Native American Programs, was asked about it at a Senate Committee on Indian Affairs hearing in June, she said she was unable to offer a policy position.

"I'm career staff at HUD so I don't comment on what vehicle is appropriate," Frechette said on June 13. She was hired for the position in May 2016.

The person who would be able to offer a policy position is the Assistant Secretary for Public and Indian Housing. President Donald Trump, though, has failed to nominate someone for the job, eight months into his administration.

08:00

UN officials slam Tories for breaching disabled people's human rights Aboriginal News Group Newswire

UN officials slam Tories for breaching disabled people's human rights: [socialistworker.co.uk] United Nations (UN) officials grilled Britain's government over its treatment of disabled people yesterday, Wednesday.

It was part a hearing by the UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in Geneva, Switzerland, set to continue on Thursday.

Rhian Davies, representing Disability Wales in Geneva, said the committee was "slaying" the government over its record.

Disabled UN rapporteurs asked why there are so many suicides by disabled people and why Tasers are used on people in secure mental health facilities. They questioned why disabled people aren't consulted on policies affecting them.

The hearing also focused on the gaps in equalities lawand the devastating succession of benefit cuts.

06:13

Forget statues this artist is confronting historic figures on our money Warrior Publications

John A MacDonald money quote 1

Not So Funny Money stickers by Jay Soule, a.k.a Chippewar, puts a critical spin on Canadian currency. (Chippewar)

Its 100 per cent about being honest about history.

by Christa Couture, August 24, 2017

The artwork of Jay Soule, a.k.a Chippewar, can be found in conventional art galleries but also painted on concrete, stuck to lamp posts and tattooed on peoples skin.

This summer, Soule, from the Chippewas of the Thames First Nation, Ont., has a new grassroots sticker project taking on the faces that adorn Canadian currency  a timely campaign, as monuments of problematic historical figures are being questioned both in Canada and south...

Friday, 25 August

16:28

B.C. fish farms hit by occupations following release of footage showing sickly, blind salmon Warrior Publications

fish farm protest occupation 1by Jorge Barrera, APTN National News, August 24, 2017

Indigenous leaders are calling on Fisheries and Oceans Minister Dominic LeBlanc to immediately halt fish farming along British Columbias coastal region following the release of video footage showing diseased farmed Atlantic salmon some blind, others with swollen gills and blistersswimming through pens thick with fish feces.

The calls came as a small, First Nation-led group occupied a Marine Harvest salmon farm on Swanson Island, about 17 km from Alert Bay, B.C., with a promise to remain until the provincial government revoked the operations license of occupation. This followed a brief occupation on Wednesday which targeted the Cermaq-owned farm on nearby Burdwood Island.

Hereditary Chief Ernest Alfred, from the Nagmis, Lawitsis and Mamalilikala Nations, was involved in the Swanson Island occupation which triggered a response from local RCMP who are also at the site.

This place is ours and were not moving, said Alfred, in a Facebook post published shortly after...

15:06

Sign the global petition for an Internationally Supervised Vote in West Papua - Free West Papua Aboriginal News Group Newswire

Sign the global petition for an Internationally Supervised Vote in West Papua - Free West Papua: This petition calls on the UN to appoint a Special Representative to investigate the human rights situation in West Papua; & put West Papua back on the Decolonisation Committee agenda by holding an internationally supervised vote. The petition is paramount in the struggle for independence for West Papua, as the vote will finally give West Papuans the opportunity to decide on their own future, a vote they were denied in 1969, and a vote that will finally put an end to the genocide.
@BackTheSwim & #LetWestPapuaVote

14:55

B.C. fish farms hit by occupations following release of footage showing sickly, blind salmon - APTN News Aboriginal News Group Newswire

B.C. fish farms hit by occupations following release of footage showing sickly, blind salmon - APTN News: Jorge Barrera
APTN National News
Indigenous leaders are calling on Fisheries and Oceans Minister Dominic LeBlanc to immediately halt fish farming along British Columbias coastal region following the release of video footage showing diseased farmed Atlantic salmon some blind, others with swollen gills and blistersswimming through pens thick with fish feces.

The calls came as a small, First Nation-led group occupied a Marine Harvest salmon farm on Swanson Island, about 17 km from Alert Bay, B.C., with a promise to remain until the provincial government revoked the operations license of occupation. This followed a brief occupation on Wednesday which targeted the Cermaq-owned farm on nearby Burdwood Island.

14:33

Landmark Talks on Uncontacted Tribe Fail to Stop Logging Native News Online

There have been confrontations between the Ayoreo and the Paraguayan authorities in recent years, as the tribe have protested against the theft and destruction of their land.
GAT/ Survival

Published August 25, 2017

Landmark talks between the Paraguayan government and a recently contacted tribe have yet to reach an agreement, allowing rampant deforestation to continue. Some members of the tribe are uncontacted, and live in a rapidly shrinking island of forest.

The talks began six months ago after a petition from the Ayoreo tribe to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, an influential body which holds governments in the Americas to account on human rights issues. The Ayoreo have been claiming the right to their ancestral land since 1993.

Halfway through the year-long process, however, and little concrete action has been taken, leading to fears for the tribes long-term survival. A technical study is due to be carried out to assess the feasibility of securing the land.

The government has also failed to stop the rapid logging of land owned by the Ayoreo, despite a 2016 emergency order from the Inter-American Commission to protect the uncontacted Indians and halt deforestation.

...

14:32

American Indian Alaska Native Tourism Association Celebrates 19thAnnual Conference with Host Oneida Tribe of Wisconsin Native News Online

Published August 25, 2017

19th Annual American Indian Tourism Conference September 11-14 in Green Bay

GREEN BAY  The American Indian Alaska Native Tourism Association (AIANTA) proudly announces that their 19th Annual American Indian Tourism Conference (AITC) will be hosted by the Oneida Tribe of Wisconsin in Green Bay, Wisconsin, on September 11 14, 2017.

The annual AITC provides a high-quality educational forum to tribes, tribal businesses and other attendees to help them with their tourism development and marketing initiatives. As the only national conference on Indian Country tourism, AITC is designed to share knowledge, experience and best practices from tourism programs around the U.S., and features an impressive line-up of expert speakers whose experience provides new information and guidance for all, from tribes just entering the tourism industry to tribes with experience in travel and tourism.

...

14:31

Navajo Beef Program Seeks to Expand Opportunities for Navajo Families Native News Online

Published August 25, 2017

ALBUQUERQUE  Speaker LoRenzo Bates (Nenahnezad, Newcomb, San Juan, Tiis Tsoh Sikaad, TseDaaKaan, Upper Fruitland) recently met with the Blair Labatt, the president of Labatt Food Service, a food distribution company based in the state of Texas which partners with the Navajo Nation Gaming Enterprise and Bashas grocery stores to offer Navajo Beef to consumers in various locations in the southwest.

Navajo Beef is a brand that began in 2013 under Labatt Food Service, which strives to produce USDA Choice beef that comes from cattle that are raised in an area known as Padres Mesa Ranch, a 60,000 acre demonstration ranch in Newlands, located near Sanders. Labatt Food Service currently purchases approximately 400 cattle annually from 43 Navajo families who participate in the demonstration ranch program. In addition, families from the Eastern Navajo Agency participate in the Navajo Beef program as well.

The Padres Mesa demonstration ranch program is supported by the Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation, which manages the range lands in the Newlands area by maintaining the fences and water wells for relocated families who are raising cattle.

Labatt said the program has grown since its inception to point that the company has decided to phase out a separate beef-producing program to focus more on the expansion of Navajo Beef in the southwest. According to information provide by Labatt Food Service, the program teaches Navajo ranchers the principles of herd management including vaccination care, cattle genetics, overgrazing prevention, and others.

Labatt has also met with the members of the Navajo-Hopi Land Commission to present a proposal to establish a Navajo Nation enterprise that would be delegated with the authority to manage the Padres Mesa Ranch and to expand the Navajo Beef market.

Speaker Bates stated that while the concept of growing cattle herds and providing economic opportunities for Navajo ranching families is positive, there would be many complex issues that would have to be addressed if the Nation is to assume the duties of supporting the program.

The cattle market is very complex and constantly changing and when you tie that in with this proposal to change management of the program, it becomes very challenging and raises a lot of questions that need to be answered, added Speake...

14:05

Tariq Ramadan: As Muslims Condemn Spain Attack, Americans Must Denounce U.S. Killings in Syria, Iraq | Democracy Now! Aboriginal News Group Newswire

Tariq Ramadan: As Muslims Condemn Spain Attack, Americans Must Denounce U.S. Killings in Syria, Iraq | Democracy Now!: Spanish police are continuing to investigate last weeks attack in Barcelona, where 15 people died after a van plowed into a crowded walkway along Las Ramblasthe citys most famous avenue. On Monday police shot dead the man suspected of driving the van: a Moroccan-born, 22-year-old named Younes Abou-yaaqoub. Police believe he was part of a 12-person cell plotting to carry out a series of bomb attacks. Eight of the cells members are now dead, four suspected members have been detained. The events of the past week have shocked many in the Barcelona region. On Sunday, thousands of Muslims, including many from Morocco, marched against violence in Barcelona, chanting, "Islam is peace" and "not in my name." We speak to Tariq Ramadan, Professor of Contemporary Islamic Studies at Oxford University. Ramadan was named by Time Magazine as one of the most important innovators of the twenty-first century. In 2004, Tariq Ramadan accepted a job at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana, and Time magazine listed him among the top 100 thinkers in the world. But nine days before Ramadan was set to start teaching here in the United States, the Bush administration revoked his visa, invoking a provision of the PATRIOT Act that allows the government to deny entry to non-citizens who "endorse or espouse terrorism."

07:36

Zinke Recommendatons to Trump on Bear Ears & Other Monuments Not Made Public Native News Online

Published August 24, 2017

WASHINGTON Today, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke sent a draft report to the president which included his findings and recommendations on national monuments that were under review as a result of the April 26, 2017 executive order. The report summary can be read here.

However, the fate of Bear Ears distinction and some other monuments were not made public. Several American Indian tribes oppose the Trump administration opposes the reversal of Bear Ears being designated as a national monument.

The extensive 120-day review included more than 60 meetings with hundreds of advocates and opponents of monument designations, tours of monuments conducted over air, foot, car, and horseback (including a virtual tour of a marine monument), and a thorough review of more than 2.4 million public comments submitted to the Department on regulations.gov. Additionally, countless more meetings and conversations between senior Interior officials and local, state, Tribal, and non-government stakeholders including multiple Tribal listening sessions.

The review was initiated by President Trump in order to restore trust inthe multiple-use mission of the Department and to give rural communities a voice in federal land management decisions. In order to make the process transparent and give local residents and stakeholders a voice, the Secretary announced on May 5, 2017 the opening up of a formal comment period for the review, as the President directed. This was the first time ever that a formal comment period was open on regulations.gov for national monuments designated under the Antiquities Act.

...

05:21

Collapsed fish farm that released thousands of Atlantic salmon had structural problems last month Warrior Publications

Fish farm collapse 1Washington state fish farms collapse has reinvigorated salmon-farming debates

By Lisa Johnson, CBC News, August 23, 2017

The Washington state fish farm that collapsed allowing many thousands of Atlantic salmon to escape into the Pacific showed signs of trouble last month, and was slated for upgrades.

In late July, the Cooke Aquaculture-owned operation near Cypress Island required emergency work to stabilize the net pens after crews saw them moving in currents.

Then last weekend, the same pens, containing 300,000 Atlantic salmon, began showing damage on Saturday before collapsing on Sunday, releasing an unknown number of fish.

While the incident happened in Washington state, its reinvigorated the longstanding debate about fish farming on Canadas West Coast, including the controversial but common practice of farming Atlantic salmon in Pacific waters.

In both cases, Cooke Aquaculture blamed high tides and cu...

05:01

On boycotts, Palestine, and resistance: a review of 'Assuming Boycott' Aboriginal News Group Newswire

On boycotts, Palestine, and resistance: a review of 'Assuming Boycott': [mondoweiss.net] Palestinian and anti-colonial activists felt betrayed that an anti-war, feminist, indigenous cultural icon like Harjo would turn a deaf ear to friends and political allies. For her part, Harjo claimed that she felt bullied and harassed. The emotionally charged debate was intensified by the theatrical presence of pro-Israel propagandists and trolls who, without a trace of irony, cast themselves as guardians of freedom of expression.

Harjo defended her decision on her Facebook page and in an interview with the Jerusalem Post, citing the metaphysical argument that the arts have the special capacity to transcend the barriers of political conflict. This mystical concept struck many BDS proponents as disingenuous since Harjo herself had previously boycotted George Bushs White House during the Iraq War, demonstrating a conviction that some political boundaries ought never be crossed. How and why had she decided that performing in an Israeli apartheid space didnt merit the same refusal?

05:00

Canadian oil firm hit by occupation as Peru faces warning of wider Indigenous uprising Warrior Publications

Peru oil occupation 2017

Photo: APTN National News

by Jorge Barrera, APTN National news, August 23, 2017

Hundreds of Indigenous people have reportedly seized oil facilities operated by the subsidiary of a Canadian company in Perus Amazon region amid warnings of a wider uprising over the Peruvian governments failure to consult with communities before allowing extraction on their traditional territories.

Members of the Indigenous Los Jardines community seized facilities in the Amazon region of Loreto operated by Frontera Energy Corp, a subsidiary of Canadian firm Pacific Exploration & Production, according to local and wire service reports. The people of Los Jardines also briefly occupied the airport in Loreto earlier this month.

The occupation is targeting one of the countrys largest oil fields. Frontera told Peruvian newspaper El Commercio the action has impacted the production of ab...

04:52

Traditional Mikmag 1st and 7th District Chiefs oppose Junex projects in Gaspesie, Quebec Warrior Publications

by Suzanne Patles & Gary Metallic, The Media Coop, August 24, 2017

Today, we traditional council chiefs from the 1st and the 7th Districts of Mikmaki have gathered at the Junexit Banquet organized by the Camp by the River. We are here not only to support the occupation that has been set up on August 7th against Junex but also to assert our inherent rights and title over our unceded and unsurrendered territory, as affirmed by the 1763 Royal Proclamation. We assert our presence here to protect our territory under the Protection clauses for unceded lands, as protected by Constitutional Rights, Charter Rights, Human Rights, and International Rights.

The Chief of Mikamki 1st District, Unamaki, which is currently involved in its own struggle against oil and gas exploration by Alton Gas, as well as the 2011 historic and victorious struggle against fracking in Elsipogtog (6th District), thus adds her support to the 7th Districts current opposition to exploration and extraction on its land by Junex.

After the dismantling of the blockade, the struggle is just beginning, and coalitions are being formed between Mikmaq District Chiefs from the northern and southern ends of our Nation, as well as with land and water protectors from other nations.

As Traditional Mikmaq council Chiefs, we affirm our complete and inviolable sovereignty over the land Junex is illegally attempting to destroy. We are not concerned by the Indian Act (INAC) leadership, whos authority lies exclusively within the border of the Federal Indian Reserves as stated in the Chapter 91.24 of the Constitution of Canada (Indians and land reserved for Indians). INAC describes only boundaries of reservations, and not traditional hunting and fishing territories. Outside of Federal Indian Reserves, the authority and jurisdiction lies with the rights holders, i.e. traditional district chiefs.

We demand an immediate moratorium on all exploration and/or development of oil and/or gas on traditional mikmaki territory, District 7.

As Mikmaq peoples, we have a duty and obligation to defend and protect our Ancestral District territory. We cannot remain silent and condone any oil drilling within our territory that will poison our lands, waters, fauna and wildlife. We call all groups and individuals concerned by the protection of water and land on Gespegawagi territory to voice their support, take action, and join the struggle on site.

Suzanne Patles, 1st Unamaki district
Gary Metallic, 7th District Gespegawagi

VERSION IN FRENCH / EN FRANCAIS:
...

02:06

Experienced Tribal Advocate & Attorney Joe Sarcinella Joins NAFSA Native News Online

Published August 24, 2017

Sarcinella, who was most recently at Department of Defense, is NAFSAs new COO and General Counsel
WASHINGTON Joe Sarcinella has joined the Native American Financial Services Association (NAFSA) as its Chief Operations Officer and General Counsel. Mr. Sarcinella is an experienced tribal advocate and attorney, with many years in tribal advocacy and business-related fields. Over the previous four years, he served as Senior Advisor and Liaison for Native American Affairs for the Office of the Secretary of Defense. While there, Mr. Sarcinella was the lead official monitoring Department of Defense and military compliance with all applicable federal laws, treaties and executive orders relating to government-to-government relationships with Tribes and Native Hawaiians.
Joe is the perfect fit for NAFSA as we continue to grow in membership and stature, said Gary Davis, Executive Director of NAFSA. He has a deep understanding of both Indian Country and the federal government, and will be a tremendous asset to NAFSA and our members as we continue to advocate for a robust tribal finance sector that strengthens and upholds tribal sovereignty. Our members and our entire sector will benefit from his knowledge and leadership.
Mr. Sarcinella began his professional career in non-profit tribal youth programming, and later transitioned into law and public policy. He has provided professional services to colleges and educational institutions, The National Congress of American Indians, six tribal governments, the federal government and numerous private individuals and groups. Joe first came to DC to work for the Navajo Nation Washington Office where his primary responsibility was fostering and maintaining relationships with members of Congress and the federal agencies. His extensive portfolio with the Navajo Nation required constant advocacy on the hill, where he had great success securing the interests of the Navajo people.
His professional portfolio also includes gaming, taxation & finance, government contracting, transportation, cultural resources, Human Rights, the environment, and natural resources and energy.
Whether through assisting with ceremonies in the summer, or as an attorney and advocate in DC, I have served Indian Country my whole life, said Sarcinella...

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